Garda statistics show drop in Limerick property crime

first_imgNewsCrime & CourtGarda statistics show drop in Limerick property crimeBy David Raleigh – October 17, 2019 211 Print Previous articleNews Roundup 19 October, 2019Next articleCocaine epidemic is biggest problem facing Limerick Gardaí David Raleigh Twitter “PROPERTY CRIME”, more commonly known as burglary, robbery and theft, is down by ten per cent in Limerick City and County, according to the latest local Garda crime statistics.The breakdown across districts showed a “sizeable drop” in Bruff where Gardaí recorded a 42 per cent decrease in burglaries, thefts and robbery.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In Newcastle West property crime dropped by 12 per cent, from 335 to 294 incidents.In Bruff the number of recorded incidents was reduced from from 205 to 119.In the Roxboro Road Garda area, the figure had reduced by 14 per cent from 794 incidents to 679, and there was also a four per cent reduction in property crime in the Henry Street Garda area (from 1784 to 1712).“Across the board there were drops everywhere with regard to property crime, and that includes your burglary element in it. It is quiet positive,” Senior Crime and Policing Analyst Lynda Breen told a meeting of the Limerick Joint Policing Committee.She said that there has been a 17 per cent reduction in non-aggravated burglaries.In Newcastle West, Bruff, and Henry Street Garda areas there was a reduction in non-aggravated burglaries however in Roxboro Road there was a three per cent increase.Crimes Against the Person, including murder, murder threats, and assaults, dropped by four per cent across the city and county. Linkedincenter_img Facebook Email WhatsApp Advertisementlast_img read more

USG prepares for meeting with Nikias and Quick

first_imgAt last night’s Undergraduate Student Government Senate meeting, USG President Rini Sampath announced a forthcoming meeting with USC President C. L. Max Nikias to discuss past and future plans.Sampath mentioned that for the past two weeks, she has consulted her executive cabinet and the various program board assemblies for the topics to be covered at the meeting. Sampath stressed the importance of this official meeting, which comes only once per semester.“I’ve made it very clear that, in the coming year, any opportunity I have to sit down with an administrator is an opportunity for other students to have a seat at the table,” Sampath said. “I think that in the past, students have often felt disconnected with the administrators and I want to show that this is an opportunity for them to have their concerns heard through the USG leadership.”Sampath then described the various issues she plans to cover during the meeting. One of the issues she will touch upon is mental health advocacy. Sampath stated that mental health is major issue on campus, and that the number of counselors is insufficient.“What we find is that [the] Engemann [Student Health Center] … looks beautiful, but it’s probably not the most functional space,” Sampath said. “One student told one of our directors that he got on the phone with someone at Engemann, and the first question they asked him was, ‘Are you suicidal?’ That’s not how we should determine if someone should be seeing a counselor or not.”Sampath said that the student was then sent an email and told that he would have a three-week wait time before he met a counselor.“I don’t know if this is just one case, but I think that this is definitely happening to other students if it is happening to one student,” Sampath said. “I want to express to President Nikias that if we have a $6 billion endowment campaign, we need to be investing resources from that campaign to [be] fixing problems like this.”Another policy point on the agenda, Sampath mentioned, will be sexual assault prevention. Francesca Bessey,  assistant director of Wellness Affairs and a sexual assault activist on campus, drafted a two-page document on sexual assault prevention strategies with Shyann Murphy and Vanessa Diaz, co-directors of the Women Students Assembly.“If all these activists are putting so much time and effort into events like Take Back the Night with the clothesline project at alumni park, we need to see some kind of response from our administration,” Sampath said. “We want acknowledgement that we have a culture on campus that disrespects women at times, but also things like increasing funding for programming these awareness events.”During the meeting with Nikias, Sampath will also touch on proposals to establish sustainability efforts. She mentioned that Environmental Student Assembly Director Shawn Rhoads has been working to put together a sustainability plan.“This is something that USG backs. If we want to be a leading university we need to be looking at sustainability efforts as well,” Sampath said. “The more we want to compete with these top 25 and Ivy League schools, the more we need to be the frontrunners and pioneers in things like sustainability.”Lastly, Sampath will be discussing the Black House project and minority issues on campus.“I really want to bring attention to the issues of marginalized communities on campus with our ‘I, Too, Am USC’ project, and I’m hoping to bring some of the photographs from that campaign of students expressing their discomfort on this campus,” Sampath said. “These are the tough conversations that we need to be having with administrators, especially if I have only one opportunity per semester to meet with people like President Nikias.”When asked if this would be a symbolic meeting, Sampath answered that past meetings with Nikias have brought results.“The last time that we met, President Nikias told us that he would be looking to waive security fees during events like Spring Fest, which lifts a huge burden from USG,” Sampath said. “That is just one example, but now I think it’s time to go in and ask him these requests that could make our students happier.”On May 5, Sampath and USG Vice President Jordan Fowler will also meet with Provost Michael Quick to discuss future plans involving the Academic Affairs committee and Academic Culture committee.last_img read more

Syracuse reportedly adds graduate transfer Whisper Fisher from St. Joseph’s

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 21, 2019 at 6:04 pm Contact David: [email protected] Former St. Joseph’s forward Whisper Fisher is reportedly transferring to Syracuse, according to her father, Matthew. Fisher, a graduate transfer, will be able to play immediately.“Whisper is excited about the chance play for coach (Quentin Hillsman),” Matthew said. “He’s one of the best player development and X’s and O’s coaches in the country.”Fisher’s move to SU marks the second transfer of her collegiate career. The Owings Mills, Maryland native played at Loyola Chicago as a freshman, where she appeared in 21 games and averaged less than a point and rebound per game. After sitting out the 2016-17 season due to NCAA transfer rules, Fisher spent two seasons at St. Joseph’s. She logged her best collegiate season in 2018-19, posting 3.8 points and 4.4 rebounds per game. The Hawks went a combined 31-34 in Fisher’s two years on the team.The addition of Fisher, 6-foot-2, will help fill the void left by standout forward Miranda Drummond, who graduated from SU in 2019. Drummond averaged 31.9 minutes and 14.1 points per game in two seasons at Syracuse and holds the Orange’s career 3-point field goal percentage record (40.2 percent).AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more