Top pool player staged sham robbery of Limerick bookies

first_imgNewsTop pool player staged sham robbery of Limerick bookiesBy Staff Reporter – December 23, 2016 3204 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Neil Madigan from Limerick, who in 2014 was ranked the No 1 Irish Pool Player, staged a robbery at the betting shop he managed. Picture: Don Moloney / Press 22A TOP ranked pool player has been “left in the gutter” over his involvement in robbing the betting shop he managed, Limerick Circuit Court was told last week.Neil Madigan (32) of Prospect, Limerick was said to have run up large gambling debts and was trying to “bet his way out of trouble” when he staged a robbery of the Ladbrokes betting shop on Cecil Street shortly before 9:30pm on March 17, 2015.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up An international pool player, he was also involved in bringing high profile snooker players like Denis Taylor and Steve Davis to Limerick for exhibition matches. He even had an exhibition match arranged for the day after the alleged robbery.Detective Garda Michael Lambe said that Neil Madigan was counting cash when Hayden Johnson (22) from Ballinacurra Weston approached the counter.Madigan later told Gardaí that he let Johnson in behind the counter because he was afraid he was going to be stabbed.Johnson made off with €6,000 in cash but missed another bag of money in the safe.The store manager gave a detailed statement to Gardaí in which he recounted details of the alleged robbery. Extensive CCTV footage was from around the city centre was examined and eventually Johnson was identified through an unusual jacket he was wearing.Johnson, who was a former apprentice jockey, was arrested and after initially denying any involvement, he later admitted to robbing the betting shop and claimed there was only €2,000 in the cash bag which was not recovered.The head of security at Ladbrokes became suspicious of Neil Madigan’s actions on the night of the alleged robbery as he had failed to adhere to certain security protocols. He had also failed to make bank lodgements for two days before incident.Prosecution Counsel John O’Sullivan BL said it soon became apparent “that it was effectively an inside job”.He was betting on credit at the shop he managed as well as betting in other shops around the city.Three months later, he admitted his involvement and told Gardaí that he met an unnamed man who said he could help him by “sending a young fella down if there was money ready”.Madigan, who worked with Ladbrokes for 11 years, didn’t think the man was serious but went along with it after he was told the debt would be wiped out.Defence counsel Brian McInerney said his client was now “in the gutter and has limited prospects such is the attraction this story will get”.Hayden Johnson had since secured a job and offered to pay €100 every two weeks to repay the €2,000 he claimed was in the bag.Adjourning the case for 12 months, Judge Tom O’Donnell said he would take into account if any compensation was paid.Madigan and Johnson were released on continuing bail. Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival TAGSDennis TaylorfeaturedLadbrokeslimerickLimerick Limerick Circuit CourtPoolrobberySteve Davis WhatsApp Print Facebook Limerick’s Neil Madigan who in 2014 was ranked the No 1 Irish Pool Player.Picture: Don Moloney / Press 22 Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Previous articleLimerick victim of savage assault says there’s no justiceNext articleWin cinema tickets Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Twitter Linkedin Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

Derek Chauvin trial closing arguments: Live updates

first_imgKuzma/iStock(MINNEAPOLIS) — The prosecution and defense in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd are set to take their final cracks on Monday at swaying jurors after calling more than 40 witnesses and presenting numerous videos of the 46-year-old Black man’s fatal 2020 arrest.Here’s how the news is developing Monday. All times Eastern:Apr 19, 11:51 amThe state does not have to prove Chauvin intended to kill Floyd, prosecutor saysChauvin’s actions were intentional because he knew that kneeling on Floyd’s neck was dangerous and an unlawful use of force, Schleicher said.“We don’t have to show that the Defendant intended to kill him,” he said. “The only thing about the defendant’s intent that we have to prove is that he applied force to George Floyd on purpose, that this wasn’t an accident.”Apr 19, 11:25 am‘Common sense’ that Floyd died because Chauvin pressed down on his lungs, state saysFloyd died because of a low level of oxygen, not because of a drug overdose or a preexisting heart condition, as the defense attempted to portray, Schleicher said.“‘Die of a drug overdose,’ that’s not common sense, that’s nonsense,” Schleicher said.The prosecutor continued, “Believe your eyes. What you saw happened, happened. It happened. The defendant pressed down on George Floyd so his lungs did not have the room to breathe.”Apr 19, 11:17 amPutting Floyd in the prone position was ‘completely unnecessary,’ prosecutor saysFloyd was already handcuffed on the ground, positioned on his side, when he was then put in the prone position, on his stomach, Schleicher said.While a subject is on his side, known as the “prone recovery position,” it provides room for the chest to expand so he can breathe, Schleicher said.Putting Floyd on his stomach after he was already in the recovery position was “completely unnecessary,” Schleicher said.“That is when the excessive force began,” he said.Apr 19, 11:06 am‘What the defendant did was an assault’: ProsecutorApr 19, 11:03 amGeorge Floyd is not the one on trial, state saysSchleicher reminded the jury that Floyd is not the defendant in the case, pointing to the testimony that characterized Floyd as having a drug addiction and the accusation that he used a fake $20 bill in the Cup Foods, which prompted the 911 call that brought Chauvin to the scene.“But he is not on trial,” Schleicher. “He didn’t get a trial when he was alive, and he is not on trial here.”Schleicher also dismissed claims the defense made that Floyd was noncompliant and resisting arrest, stating that Floyd followed commands to put his hands on the steering wheel upon his first encounter with Minnesota Police officers.“That is not resistance,” Schleicher said. “That is compliance.”Apr 19, 10:55 am‘This is not a prosecution of the police,’ prosecutor saysSchleicher made “very clear” that the state was prosecuting Derek Chauvin, not the Minneapolis Police Department, calling policing a “most noble profession.”“This case is called the State of Minnesota versus Derek Chauvin,” Schleicher said. “This case isn’t called the State of Minnesota versus the police.”Schleicher also said that Chauvin is not on trial for who he was, a police officer, but for “what he did,” pointing to the multiple witnesses on the scene who felt compelled to call the police on the police.”He accused Chauvin of abandoning his values and training.“He did not follow the department’s use of force rules,” Schleicher said. “He did not perform CPR. He knew better. He just didn’t do better.”Apr 19, 10:45 amFloyd’s last words were ‘Please. I can’t breathe.’: ProsecutorSchleicher emphasized to the jury that Floyd’s last words were to plead with Chauvin.“Floyd’s final words were, ‘Please. I can’t breathe,’” Schleicher said. “He said those words to the defendant. He asked for help with his very last breathe.”Rather than help, Chauvin “continued to push him down, to grind his knees, to twist his hand and twist his fingers into the handcuffs that bound him,” Schleicher said.Apr 19, 10:38 amProsecutor describes George Floyd’s relationship with his motherHennepin County Prosecutor Steve Schleicher began the state’s closing arguments by describing Floyd’s relationship with his mother, Larcenia Jones Floyd, the matriarch of the family.“And you heard about the special bond that she and George Floyd shared during his life.” Schleicher said. “You heard about their relationship, how he would always take time, special attention to be with his mother, how he would still cuddle with her in the fetal position.”Floyd could be heard in cellphone video calling out for his mother as Chauvin kneeled on top of him.Apr 19, 10:17 amJudge gives jury instructionsHennepin County Judge Peter Cahill read instructions to the jury before closing arguments began.Cahill also gave the jury definitions for reasonable doubt and reminded the jury to consider all the evidence they have heard or seen in court.Apr 19, 9:54 amClosing arguments to begin Monday morningThe attorneys will begin presenting their closing arguments in the high-profile case just after 10 a.m. local time, with prosecutors, who allege Chauvin killed Floyd on May 25, 2020, by holding his knee on the back of his neck for over 9 minutes, going first.Defense attorney Eric Nelson is expected to counter that Chauvin, a 19-year police veteran, was abiding by his police training when he and two other officers put a handcuff Floyd in a prone restraint and that a sudden heart attack and drugs in his system killed him more so than Chauvin’s knee.Once the closing arguments wrap up, the jury will be sequestered while they deliberate a verdict.The Chauvin jury is composed of eight people who are white and six who identify as people of color, including four who are Black. They range in age from their early 20s to 60.Among the panel are a tax auditor, an executive for a nonprofit health care company, a grandmother with an undergraduate degree in childhood psychology, a banker, an information technology manager who speaks multiple languages and a motorcycle-riding executive assistant.Chauvin is charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges and chose not to testify in his own defense.During the trial, which began on March 29 and enters its 15th day on Monday, prosecutors relied heavily on video taken of the deadly encounter by multiple bystanders, surveillance and police body camera to make their case that the use of force Chauvin applied on Floyd was unreasonable, unnecessary and not part of any training or policies of the Minneapolis Police Department.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

A cautionary tale: A study of a methane enhancement over the North Sea

first_imgAirborne measurements of a methane (CH4) plume over the North Sea from August 2013 are analyzed. The plume was only observed downwind of circumnavigated gas fields, and three methods are used to determine its source. First, a mass balance calculation assuming a gas field source gives a CH4 emission rate between 2.5 ± 0.8×104 and 4.6 ± 1.5×104 kg h−1. This would be greater than the industry’s reported 0.5% leak rate if it were emitting for more than half the time. Second, annual average UK CH4 emissions are combined with an atmospheric dispersion model to create pseudo-observations. Clean air from the North Atlantic passed over mainland UK, picking up anthropogenic emissions. To best explain the observed plume using pseudo-observations, an additional North Sea source from the gas rigs area is added. Third, the δ13C-CH4 from the plume is shown to be −53‰, which is lighter than fossil gas but heavier than the UK average emission. We conclude that either an additional small-area mainland source is needed, combined with temporal variability in emission or transport in small-scale meteorological features. Alternatively, a combination of additional sources that are at least 75% from the mainland (−58‰) and up to 25% from the North Sea gas rigs area (−32‰) would explain the measurements. Had the isotopic analysis not been performed, the likely conclusion would have been of a gas field source of CH4. This demonstrates the limitation of analyzing mole fractions alone, as the simplest explanation is rejected based on analysis of isotopic data.last_img read more

Target: New ways to battle disease

first_imgFor decades, developing medicine to treat disease was a lengthy and often discouraging process: create a drug, test on a lab animal, hold a human clinical trial, and hope to calibrate an effective dose to kill the disease without devastating the patient.Now, researchers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and the MIT are tapping the human genome mapped by its founders, hoping to create effective treatments for vexing afflictions.“When you rely on biology — not models but real humans — to reveal the root cause of the disease, the good news is you can discover insights for even the most daunting ones, like schizophrenia,” said Stuart L. Schreiber, Ph.D. ’81, director of the year-old Center for the Science of Therapeutics.Schreiber made his remarks Wednesday during a presentation on “The Road to Vital Therapy,” part of the Broad’s midsummer science lecture series. More than 500 people registered for the event, which focused on the institute’s efforts in what it called “chemistry-enabled, patient-based drug discovery.”Schreiber, who is also Morris Loeb Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biography at Harvard, said drug discovery over the past 40 years has been a “daunting” process that can take as long as 15 years, fail 90 percent of the time, and often miss its mark.“When you rely on biology — not models but real humans — to reveal the root cause of the disease, the good news is you can discover insights for even the most daunting ones, like schizophrenia,” said Stuart L. Schreiber.Rather than focusing on traditional experiments, Broad researchers look to biology and chemistry — what Schreiber called “experiments in nature.” One is underway on Crohn’s disease, a painful inflammatory bowel ailment that afflicts as many as 700,000 Americans; it is expected to yield fruitful results.Broad researchers know that some Crohn’s genes are normal, some are not, and others protect against the disease. The institute’s goal is to find a drug therapy that fixes the gene that gives a person Crohn’s.Schreiber said a remaining challenge is that the work identifying genetic targets is too advanced for the chemists devising medical therapies. The Crohn’s gene target “pocket” that would hold the medicine is three-dimensional, while most drugs are two. Broad scientists are working on a solution.Genomic information isn’t a magic elixir, though. James E. Bradner ’94, associate director of the Center for Science of Therapeutics and an investigator at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, said that researchers thought when the human genome was sequenced, drugs could be made for each cancer-causing mutation.It turns out that there are a million unique cancer mutations in 24,000 genes. Many are passenger mutations — those caused by “smoking, chewing tobacco, breathing air, or bad luck.” At least 480 contribute to cancer, while 149 are known to cause it, Bradner said.Like Schreiber, Bradner believes that new drugs aimed at single genetic targets are the answer, when the technology to create them catches up.“We need new technologies, multiple avenues of therapy targeting these” mutations, said Bradner, a physician-scientist who is also an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. “One of the obstacles is we may not have the technology we need.”Schreiber, speaking afterward, said he is hopeful that genomics and chemistry can be integrated to develop drugs to undermine stubborn diseases.“I’m optimistic because there’s a blueprint, a roadmap to get there,” Schreiber said. “It’s not going to be easy, but it’s very different from 10 years ago, when you didn’t know how difficult or easy it would be when you didn’t have the roadmap. Now, we just need to keep a laser focus.”Vivian Siegel, director of education and outreach, moderated. Alykhan Shamji ’00, Ph.D ’05, executive director of the Broad’s Center for the Science of Therapeutics, Michael A. Foley, director of the Therapeutics Platform, and Brian Hubbard, director of the center’s Therapeutics Projects Group, also were on the panel.The next lecture in the series, “Exploring the Genome’s ‘Dark Matter’: What the Frontiers of Genomic Research Are Revealing About Cancer,” is 6-7 p.m. July 17. It is free and open to the public.last_img read more