Garda statistics show drop in Limerick property crime

first_imgNewsCrime & CourtGarda statistics show drop in Limerick property crimeBy David Raleigh – October 17, 2019 211 Print Previous articleNews Roundup 19 October, 2019Next articleCocaine epidemic is biggest problem facing Limerick Gardaí David Raleigh Twitter “PROPERTY CRIME”, more commonly known as burglary, robbery and theft, is down by ten per cent in Limerick City and County, according to the latest local Garda crime statistics.The breakdown across districts showed a “sizeable drop” in Bruff where Gardaí recorded a 42 per cent decrease in burglaries, thefts and robbery.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In Newcastle West property crime dropped by 12 per cent, from 335 to 294 incidents.In Bruff the number of recorded incidents was reduced from from 205 to 119.In the Roxboro Road Garda area, the figure had reduced by 14 per cent from 794 incidents to 679, and there was also a four per cent reduction in property crime in the Henry Street Garda area (from 1784 to 1712).“Across the board there were drops everywhere with regard to property crime, and that includes your burglary element in it. It is quiet positive,” Senior Crime and Policing Analyst Lynda Breen told a meeting of the Limerick Joint Policing Committee.She said that there has been a 17 per cent reduction in non-aggravated burglaries.In Newcastle West, Bruff, and Henry Street Garda areas there was a reduction in non-aggravated burglaries however in Roxboro Road there was a three per cent increase.Crimes Against the Person, including murder, murder threats, and assaults, dropped by four per cent across the city and county. Linkedincenter_img Facebook Email WhatsApp Advertisementlast_img read more

Skelos Corruption Trial: Closing Arguments Over, Jury Deliberations Begin

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) and his son were alternately characterized as extortionists and victims of overzealous investigators when prosecutors and defense attorneys gave summations in their corruption trial.Prosecutors used the closing arguments to tie up loose ends in their narrative of the alleged conspiracy in which they said the senator coaxed no-show jobs and payments to his son, Adam, from companies that needed his legislative help. Defense attorneys sought to poke holes in the prosecution’s theories, questioned the credibility of key witnesses and characterized their clients as having a normal father-son relationship—points prosecutors later rebutted.“The defendants knew exactly what they were doing,” Jason Masimore, assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, told the jury at Manhattan federal court while likening the former state Senate Majority Leader’s intimidation of companies reliant on him to the child who gets his way by bringing a giant gorilla to school in the popular children’s book, Where The Sidewalk Ends.Both the senator and his son, Adam, pleaded not guilty to charges of extorting bribes in exchange for legislative favors from Roslyn-based Physicians’ Reciprocal Insurers (PRI), New Hyde Park-based Glenwood Management and Arizona-based AbTech Industries.“The case has not been proven,” said the senator’s attorney, Robert Gage, who reiterated that his client never changed his position on a bill in exchange for anything. He repeatedly said, “There’s no quid pro quo.”While Gage and Adam’s attorney, Christopher Conniff, questioned the motives of the four witnesses who signed non-prosecution agreements to get a pass on crimes they may have committed in exchange for their testimony, both lawyers focused on Charles Durego, general counsel at Glenwood. Conniff said Durego is “exaggerating” how much pressure the senator and his son put on Glenwood to get work for Adam. Gage said Durego “knows how to press levers.”Conniff also said that prosecutors tried to make the jury not like Adam by using evidence that cast him in an unflattering light, such as testimony that the son cursed out and threatened to bash in the head of his boss at PRI when the boss questioned him about why he wasn’t showing up to work. Being a bad employee isn’t a crime, Conniff noted.When it was the prosecution’s turn to rebut the defense attorney’s closing arguments, Masimore countered that the defense had tried to play on the jury’s emotions by casting the senator as a loving father simply helping his down-on-his-luck son. The federal prosecutor also disputed defense assertions that the witness testimony was too similar by arguing that they all had endured the same thing.“They experienced the Skelos shakedown playbook,” Masimore said. He listed the six “chapters” of the playbook as asking favors of businesses that lobbied the senator, making sure those businesses have money, asking for the favors while being lobbied, lying about how broke Adam is, making the companies think they got something for their money, and if they resist, getting mad “so they know they might have a problem in Albany.”Once the closing arguments concluded, Judge Kimba Wood gave the jury their instructions on how to deliberate, but let the jurors go home before she finished. After the jury hears the remainder of the instructions Thursday, they are expected to begin deliberating.-With additional reporting by Desiree D’ioriolast_img read more

Shooting might be tipping point on guns

first_img5) In contrast, the first President George Bush showed courage and patriotism.As a volunteer teenage combat pilot, he was shot down and rescued at sea.He resigned his NRA membership when its original mission of responsible gun ownership was replaced by fringe group agendas. President Bush also called for a kinder and gentler nation.It’s the antithesis of the fear-mongering NRA.Frank WicksSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crash The slaughter of 17 in a Florida school may be a tipping point. Major companies are suddenly dropping National Rifle Association (NRA) endorsements.A new generation of politicians might find the following to be a winning combination.1) Declare the NRA to be a terrorist organization. It enables assault weapons for mass killings of increasing frequency. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinioncenter_img Meanwhile, repeated carnage in Australia has been stopped with buybacks.2) Claiming the Second Amendment allows assault weapons is ludicrous. A one-shot musket and bayonet were the weapons of our Founding Fathers.3) Debating age for ownership, banning bump stocks, background checks and arming teachers are red herrings.Responsible assault weapon ownership is an oxymoron.Anyone wanting one should be judged as too dangerous to have one.4) Samuel Johnson observed that patriotism is the refuge of scoundrels. Assault weapons are for cowards and fake patriots.The flag-waving NRA leader and the president of the United States both found ways to avoid military service.last_img read more

Wisconsin heads into uncharted territories

first_imgThe Wisconsin Badgers head to unfamiliar Bemidji State this weekend in the second to last series of the regular season. The Badgers sit just three points behind the Beavers in the conference standings and need to continue their recent success if they want to have any hope of catching BSU this weekend on the road. UW is only 1-8-1 on the road this season.[/media-credit]All season long, when the Wisconsin men’s hockey team has taken a road trip, there’s always been concern over how the youngest Badgers will handle a new atmosphere.As they head to Bemidji State (15-14-3, 9-12-3 WCHA) this weekend, the youngsters aren’t the only ones who have never visited BSU before – in fact, Wisconsin (13-15-2, 8-14-2 WCHA) as a whole has never set foot on its foe’s campus.“Well, I hope I perform well; I’ll probably be outstanding behind the bench,” head coach Mike Eaves joked.In fact, some of the guys can’t even locate Bemidji, Minn., on a map.Sophomore defenseman Joe Faust used to live in the northern woods of Minnesota, not too far away from Bemidji, and has received questions about it.“I went to a school called Greenway,” Faust said. “I have a lot of friends and family that’s still up there, so I’m excited. Some of the guys were asking me where it was. They knew it was in northern Minnesota, but they didn’t really know where, so I was describing that a little bit.”Joining the Western Collegiate Hockey Association in 2010, the Badgers hosted the Beavers last season, sweeping their newest conference adversary with a 3-2 Friday night win and a 2-0 decision Saturday. The teams have met on neutral ice once before, in the first round of the 2006 NCAA tournament.But in the WCHA era, this week marks only the second time the two teams have met and the first time even Eaves has been to Bemidji’s new arena.“I talked to (women’s hockey head coach) Mark Johnson at the radio show; he says it’s a great facility,” Eaves said. “… I think everybody is looking really forward to going and seeing what they have to offer.”With only two more series remaining in regular season play, the Badgers are looking to make the most of what games they have left. Currently sitting in 10th place in the WCHA, Wisconsin trails eighth place Bemidji by only three points.UW is beyond recognizing the importance of the weekend or any remaining series – the team has known just how important each series has been through the second half of the season. Rather, they just need to win, plain and simple.“We need four points,” sophomore Keegan Meuer said. “We’ve said it for the past couple of weeks; but it’s kind of been do or die for us. Every game has been the most important game of the season for quite a while now, but we need four points. A split will do us no good.”For a team that is 1-8-1 on the road, winning has not been an easy task.But after a 5-2 rout of a potential conference title-contending Denver team last weekend in its final home game of the season, Wisconsin knows it just has to keep the offense rolling and continue to get shots on net.“We have to go and bottle what we did on Saturday,” Eaves said. “Not only playing well but finishing offensively. Our [goal] would be to bottle that and take that on the road with us.”“I think we go back and just look at what we did well and how we did it so well,” Meuer said. “I think it was the first time we put up 35 shots in a while. We kept them under 20, and we got a lot of scoring chances. We got a lot of pucks on the net. … If we just keep getting pucks on net and keep getting traffic in front, we’re going to find ourselves with good opportunities to score.”Regardless, the Badgers hope to continue last weekend’s win and its adjoining momentum through the remainder of the season.“I think Saturday was just huge to get out of a losing streak,” Faust said. “To get that win and play better was a huge boost to the team. It’s just brought back a new level of excitement and energy, and I think we’re just going to try and carry that into Bemidji and keep going. We don’t want to get too carried away, but we have playoffs coming up; we just have to keep improving and getting better every weekend.”last_img read more