4 ways to help your credit union members during tax season

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Naomi Anderson Naomi Anderson is Vice President of Prepaid for LSC. In her current role, her team manages the day to day program support, customer service functions and implementations as well as … Web: Lsc.net Details Reach out to credit union members during the stressful tax season to ease anxiety and help build financially savvy members.  There are a handful of times throughout the year when the general public is stressing out over money, none more universal than tax season.  Put four simple elements into practice in 2020 to help members prepare for April 15:Go Digital:Use digital channels, like social media and email, to offer tax preparation tips.  Create a weekly “Tax Tip” and provide the steps necessary to be prepared each week.  Share the tips with an email campaign that focuses on easing financial stress.  Create video for social media with tax tips to increase social engagement and remind members of the value of credit union membership.Partnerships: Does your credit union partner with services or vendors who can help in tax preparation?  Compile a list of your recommended partners who can step in to help.  By promoting partnerships, members are reminded of the value of the credit union and see it as a true financial partner.  Create a visually appealing document to email members and offer it as a resource in your branches.Events: Host a tax preparation themed financial literacy event in-branch to hold member’s hands through the preliminary steps.  Offer a preparation checklist and host a Q&A on best tax preparation practices to ensure members are duly prepared.  Highlight the partnerships available to ease tax stress, too!  Events create an opportunity to upsell a credit union’s financial advisors or wealth management offerings to members.Financial Guidance:According to the Fed’s Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) Report of May 2018, 26% of people are finding it difficult to get by or are just getting by financially.  Now more than ever is the right time to promote credit union financial advisors and wealth management products and services.  Before tax returns roll in, sit down with members and offer suggestions for improving 2020 financially. You can offer advice on:  creating budgets, savings accounts, and investing for retirement.  Present safe financial management tools that support savings, like Prepaid cards by LSC, to establish trust and provide value for every credit union member.  When credit unions offer a wide range of products and services, loyalty is nurtured and members see the value of membership.As we all know, the tax man cometh.  Every year, this season invokes stress and worry for millions of Americans.  It also creates an opportunity for credit unions to engage with membership in a valuable way by alleviating stress and helping to plan for a sound financial future.last_img read more

Wisconsin heads into uncharted territories

first_imgThe Wisconsin Badgers head to unfamiliar Bemidji State this weekend in the second to last series of the regular season. The Badgers sit just three points behind the Beavers in the conference standings and need to continue their recent success if they want to have any hope of catching BSU this weekend on the road. UW is only 1-8-1 on the road this season.[/media-credit]All season long, when the Wisconsin men’s hockey team has taken a road trip, there’s always been concern over how the youngest Badgers will handle a new atmosphere.As they head to Bemidji State (15-14-3, 9-12-3 WCHA) this weekend, the youngsters aren’t the only ones who have never visited BSU before – in fact, Wisconsin (13-15-2, 8-14-2 WCHA) as a whole has never set foot on its foe’s campus.“Well, I hope I perform well; I’ll probably be outstanding behind the bench,” head coach Mike Eaves joked.In fact, some of the guys can’t even locate Bemidji, Minn., on a map.Sophomore defenseman Joe Faust used to live in the northern woods of Minnesota, not too far away from Bemidji, and has received questions about it.“I went to a school called Greenway,” Faust said. “I have a lot of friends and family that’s still up there, so I’m excited. Some of the guys were asking me where it was. They knew it was in northern Minnesota, but they didn’t really know where, so I was describing that a little bit.”Joining the Western Collegiate Hockey Association in 2010, the Badgers hosted the Beavers last season, sweeping their newest conference adversary with a 3-2 Friday night win and a 2-0 decision Saturday. The teams have met on neutral ice once before, in the first round of the 2006 NCAA tournament.But in the WCHA era, this week marks only the second time the two teams have met and the first time even Eaves has been to Bemidji’s new arena.“I talked to (women’s hockey head coach) Mark Johnson at the radio show; he says it’s a great facility,” Eaves said. “… I think everybody is looking really forward to going and seeing what they have to offer.”With only two more series remaining in regular season play, the Badgers are looking to make the most of what games they have left. Currently sitting in 10th place in the WCHA, Wisconsin trails eighth place Bemidji by only three points.UW is beyond recognizing the importance of the weekend or any remaining series – the team has known just how important each series has been through the second half of the season. Rather, they just need to win, plain and simple.“We need four points,” sophomore Keegan Meuer said. “We’ve said it for the past couple of weeks; but it’s kind of been do or die for us. Every game has been the most important game of the season for quite a while now, but we need four points. A split will do us no good.”For a team that is 1-8-1 on the road, winning has not been an easy task.But after a 5-2 rout of a potential conference title-contending Denver team last weekend in its final home game of the season, Wisconsin knows it just has to keep the offense rolling and continue to get shots on net.“We have to go and bottle what we did on Saturday,” Eaves said. “Not only playing well but finishing offensively. Our [goal] would be to bottle that and take that on the road with us.”“I think we go back and just look at what we did well and how we did it so well,” Meuer said. “I think it was the first time we put up 35 shots in a while. We kept them under 20, and we got a lot of scoring chances. We got a lot of pucks on the net. … If we just keep getting pucks on net and keep getting traffic in front, we’re going to find ourselves with good opportunities to score.”Regardless, the Badgers hope to continue last weekend’s win and its adjoining momentum through the remainder of the season.“I think Saturday was just huge to get out of a losing streak,” Faust said. “To get that win and play better was a huge boost to the team. It’s just brought back a new level of excitement and energy, and I think we’re just going to try and carry that into Bemidji and keep going. We don’t want to get too carried away, but we have playoffs coming up; we just have to keep improving and getting better every weekend.”last_img read more

Pandemic sends rural bankers survey index to all-time low

first_imgOMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A new survey of bankers in rural parts of 10 Plains and Western states shows the vast majority expect the coronavirus outbreak to push their local areas into recession. The overall index for the region plummeted to 12.1 in April from March’s already anemic 35.5. It was the lowest index recorded since the survey began in January 2006.Any score below 50 suggests a shrinking economy. Creighton University economist Ernie Goss said more than nine in 10 bankers surveyed expect the measures being taken to fight the coronavirus to lead to a recession. Bankers from Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming were surveyed.last_img

Powell eager for javelin attention

first_imgJamaica’s reigning men’s national javelin record holder Orrin Powell wants the country to take notice of his talent as he seeks to become one of few Caribbean men to represent their country successfully in the event.The 24-year-old final-year student at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport improved the national record to 75m earlier this season.Powell has been working with coach Marlon Gayle, who is also a lecturer at the Spanish Town-based institution since 2012.Gayle told The Gleaner that his charge wants eight metres to make the Olympic-qualifying mark, and he is confident Powell will be able to make the standard.The athlete, however, feels that he has a lot more to learn on a technical level and hopes to use each stage as a building block to throw even further.”Javelin is not really a Jamaican sport and something they prepare the youngsters for from a tender age, but since 2009, I started throwing.”I didn’t compete at Champs. I used to throw shot put, discus, and so on, and do long jump, ’cause I was well-rounded, but I wasn’t a name at Champs,” Powell told The Gleaner.”I actually started throwing Javelin at G.C. Foster College in 2012, and I have made some significant improvements. In one year, I moved from 51m to 70.3m,” he said.HARD WORK, DEDICATIONPowell said with hard work and dedication he moved from 70 to 75 metres, adding: “I am hoping to be the second Caribbean athlete to throw over 80 metres like Keshorn Walcott (Trinidad and Tobago).”Walcott is the London 2012 Olympic gold medallist in the event.According to Powell, there has been next to little feedback since breaking the national record.”No one has approached me in terms of making certain steps forward or to say that’s good,” he reasoned.The athlete, while keeping an eye on the qualifying standard for the Olympic Games in Brazil this Summer, says his main focus is ensuring that he will be readyin time for next year’s World Championships in London.last_img read more