Want to Get More Leads? Stop Making These 12 Landing Page Mistakes

first_img Topics: There are few feelings worse than knowing you’re missing out on something. Scientists have even given that feeling a name: FOMO (fear of missing out). Whether it’s missing out on an outing your coworkers are all going to or realizing you could have made that meeting if you only left five minutes earlier, we all get that same feeling of unrest in the pit of our stomachs when we miss out on something. Typically, FOMO has applied to events or actual things you could miss out on … but there are lots of other things that give us that same feeling, too. You know, like that time you realized if you had only done one more thing to your landing page, you’d get 30% more leads.That feeling sucks, so we want to help you steer clear of it, especially on your landing pages. Some of these could be two-minute fixes while others could be full-day projects, but each of these mistakes could be costing your business money.So save your company some moolah (and maybe get a pat on the back from your boss) and read the following about most egregious landing page errors. 1) It doesn’t pass the blink test. You have 50 milliseconds. Ready, set, go! Stop.The time it took you to read that last sentence is longer than you have to make a first impression on your landing page. A study by researchers at Carleton University found that people make judgments about a website within 50 milliseconds of viewing it. Yep, roughly the time it takes for you to blink once. Tough crowd, I know, but a crowd you’ve got to please if you want to improve your conversion rates.Make sure your landing pages are passing this blink test by following the guidelines here.2) It doesn’t have a clear value proposition. If someone has to do lots of thinking while they’re on your landing page, you’re doing it wrong. The value of downloading the piece of content you have hidden behind your form should be apparent from the get-go. That way, your landing page visitors aren’t spending time figuring out what the heck you’re offering — they’re actually filling out the form to get it. There are lots of ways to accomplish this — adding more descriptive copy or updating the landing page image to reflect what’s inside your offer could do the trick. Or maybe it’s as simple as clarifying what your offer is in your headline. If you’re having trouble figuring out if the value proposition is clear on your website, try sending it to someone within your buyer persona’s field (maybe a current customer of yours?) and give them zero context about what happens after someone would fill out the form. Then, ask them to tell you what they think they’ll get once they give over their contact information and if that exchange (content for their contact information) seems reasonable. If it’s not, you’ve got some tweaking to do!3) Your form is too long.One of the biggest mistakes people make on landing pages is to make a long form. It makes sense why you’d want to — you only have someone’s attention for a bit, so why not get all the information you can out of them … right? Not quite. A long form becomes a huge barrier to entry for your landing page visitors simply because it looks like it will take forever to fill out. Even though you know it’ll only take a minute or so, a minute seems like a long time to invest for your visitors — especially those on mobile.Those impatient visitors (aka, most of the people who’ll come to your site) want to get your offer and get out, so think about how you can make it easier for them to do that. Remove form fields that are “nice to haves” and also think about using progressive profiling to capture important, yet secondary information on the second time someone fills out a form on your site. 4) Your form is too short.On the flip-side, your form may be too short, which could very well mean you’re getting a bunch of unqualified leads flowing into your contacts database.If this is a big problem for you, consider adding a form field or two to the offers that keep sending you unqualified leads. You could also leave the initial form alone, but then use progressive profiling on future forms to collect more lead information — and the only rotate those leads to your sales team. 5) Your landing page isn’t ready for mobile.Like we said in number 3, landing pages with long forms aren’t really mobile-friendly — but that’s not the only thing that could deter mobile and tablet visitors. You might have a page that’s not responsive, making your mobile visitors swipe and swipe and swipe to scroll half an inch on the page. Or maybe your landing page image is huge, making it impossible for your visitors to access your form. Or maybe your CTA is below the fold, thus making it unclear how to submit the form. The point is you need to think about mobile traffic to your landing pages — engaging those visitors could mean the difference between hitting your monthly goal — and not. So, make sure you’re following the mobile marketing best practices outlined in this ebook.6) Your leads aren’t redirected anywhere after filling out a form. Someone wants to download your offer, so they fill out the form, hit submit, and then … nothing. They’re confused. Did their information get submitted? Will they get an email with the offer? What the heck just happened?!?!?You don’t want people to experience that confusion on your landing pages — it makes for a poor user experience that not many (if any) visitors want to go through again. Bonus: Having that type of experience on your landing pages means you’re missing out on more traffic, leads, and customers. The best way to fix this? A thank-you page. Basically, this is another page leads are redirected to after they’ve filled out the form on your landing page. There, leads can actually download or interact with the offer itself, share it with friends, and maybe even convert on another offer. It’s valuable real estate you shouldn’t miss out on. 7) Your “submit” button says “submit.”You know that phrase “you don’t know something until you know it”?  While it is “duh”-inducing, it’s actually a great reminder for your landing page designs.For example, if someone’s filling out a landing page form for the first time — in other words, the majority of people you hope to be filling out the form — they have no idea what’s going to happen when they hit “submit.” What tangible thing will they be getting for handing over their information? What is going to happen when they push that bright red button? That’s a lot of anxiety that comes with filling out a form on a website … but it’s uncertainly like this that could affect your conversion rates.To reduce that uncertainty, be extra clear on what will happen when you hit “submit.” Customize the button to say something like “Download your Ebook” or “Get Your Free Guide.” Custom buttons will help assuage some of the anxiety your landing page visitors may have and convert them more readily into leads.8) Your page has text on text on text. In short: You need images on your landing page. They help convey information faster than a hundred words of text, so you can convert visitors faster to leads on your landing pages. Sounds like a good idea, right? So go on, add a relevant image to your landing page to help communicate what your visitors will be downloading. Need help finding or creating visual content for your landing pages? Check out these 10 free design tools.9) The images you do include on your landing page aren’t helping anything.  Images can tell your story quickly and easily (they are worth 1,000 words after all) … but what if the ones you’re using on your landing pages are telling the wrong story? You can’t just throw up any old image on a landing page and expect people to convert just because there’s an image on it. You’ve got to be strategic: Check out this blog post on conversion-centered design to help you pick out the right images to use on landing pages.10) You still include a main navigation. When visitors get to your landing page, you want them there for one purpose and one purpose only: to convert to be a lead. Don’t distract them with anything — multiple CTAs, website footers, or even a top navigation. All of those elements seem like they’d be helpful, but they can actually reduce your conversion rates.So on pages where your main goal is converting people to become leads — you know, on landing pages — cut the main navigation. Then, feel free to bring the navigation back on the thank-you page and other supplementary web pages. 11) You’re asking for the same information over and over and over again.You know those people who ask for your name every single time you meet them, but you’ve met them several times before? And you know how annoying those people are? You just want them to recognize you!That’s exactly how people feel when they go to your landing pages and get asked the same questions on forms over and over and over again. So think about using smart forms and progressive profiling to reduce the number of fields people need to fill out — and thus make it easier for them to convert on your landing pages.Not only is it a delightful experience for your visitors, but it’s also it’s a way to increase your conversion rates. 12) You set your landing page and forget it. Like with any other part of your marketing, you can’t just set your landing page and forget it. Your conversion rates are never going to be perfect (and neither are ours), but you can always work toward more efficient and effective layouts and designs.Thus, it’s imperative you run A/B tests to see what works best for your visitors and your leads — what may be a tried and true best practice may not always work for your audience.So keep testing to find out what does! You never know what will work for your audience until you test it.These are just some of the landing page mistakes we see happen all the time. What other grisly landing page mistakes did we miss? Add your ideas to the comments below. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 12, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Landing Page Optimizationlast_img

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