STATE REP RACE Candidates Debate How To Help Local Small Businesses Improve

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — At last month’s 19th Middlesex State Representative debate, candidates were asked what they would do to help small businesses in Wilmington and Tewksbury, including those along Route 38, be successful.“I think the biggest problem is the street itself,” said Patricia Meuse (I-Tewksbury). “Route 38 is not wide enough to take care of the traffic for those businesses. You can’t get out of those businesses during the daytime. The planning is poor. When they put developments on 38, they don’t plan ahead.”“For pedestrians, Route 38 needs sidewalks on both sides of the street so they don’t interrupt the flow of the traffic,” added Meuse. “They need to repair the road. The road is a mess. They probably need to widen it. And there needs to be a plan in each town — if we want new businesses, how do we make it easily accessible and ease the traffic as well?”“I’m 100% pro-small business,” said Pina Prinzivalli (R-Tewksbury). “Speaking to some of the small businesses we currently have, there’s a lot of regulations they’re not happy with and is very expensive. Rent is very expensive. I’d like to work with our local officials to see what we can do for these small businesses and to lower their annual filing fees of $500.”“I will always stand up for small businesses.” added Prinzivalli. “We recently had a situation in Tewksbury with a boycott of a small business. I’m the only candidate here tonight that has stood up for that small business, whose owner is a sitting State Rep and completely beloved, Jim Lyons. I consider him a friend of mine. The business is Dandi-Lyons. This is a business he needs to support his family. I’m 100% small business and will always stand up for them.”“Route 38, when I started driving, I think had six lights on it. Now the towns have exploded in terms of population,” said Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury).  “I’m the only candidate that has said a private landowner cannot develop. I understand we need to be ahead of the curve here, we need to work with local town officials, the state, and local business owners. But to tell someone what they can or cannot do with their commercial property? That’s what the Planning Board and Zoning Board are for.”“The problem [on Route 38] is the flow,” added Robertson. “Mile 16 in Tewksbury, right across from Dandi-Lyons, or here in Wilmington with the stretch of 129 and 38 split off at Burlington Avenue, they’re chokepoints. Why? There’s outdated traffic infrastructure. They’re timed lights. And if they’re smart lights, they’re not timed particularly well. Their turning lanes are restrictive… And we have to take a look beyond Route 38 and make sure 129 and 133 don’t shoulder the burden of traffic diverted from Route 38. It needs to be a complete picture.”Moderator Tom Zuppa then asked the candidates to respond to the Dandi-Lyons controversy.“I just heard about it yesterday,” said Patricia Meuse (I-Tewksbury). “I thought I’d stay out of it. Jim is a very good friend of mine as well. If you asked me what type of ice cream I like, I’d say Dandi-Lyons. I think that was a single person who made a statement and she was way off base.”“For those who may not be in the know, the Republican Town Committee of Tewksbury put out something saying I was anti-small business because a fellow Democrat in Wilmington called for a boycott of his business,” said Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury). “This was a boycott I was not consulted with. It’s not a boycott I support. And it was something she said on her own private Facebook page, which brings up the question of her first amendment rights… This is a discrattionary issue. I want to get to work as State Rep on things like taxation, Route 38, smart development, new schools.”“My opponent is saying the person who put this out has the right to do so,” said Pina Prinzivalli (R-Tewksbury). “And that’s fine. But if you’re pro-small business, and it’s your party that’s putting the boycott out there, you should have spoken up. I was the only candidate that stood up for that small business.”“I not only have, but my committee has responded and done so in public and to all these panelists’ media outlets,” clarified Robertson. Watch the debate, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below. Fast-foward to 15:11 for the discussion on Route 38.—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/b/7/7/6/b/a/b776ba68-25f6-40b8-ba64-296deaed181f1540570938.027%2B45353637.070%40castus4-wilmington%2B15405738551540571121202980.vod.720p.181025_State_Rep_Debate.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/b/7/7/6/b/a/b776ba68-25f6-40b8-ba64-296deaed181f1540570938.027%2B45353637.070%40castus4-wilmington%2B15405738551540571121202980.vod.720p.181025_State_Rep_Debate.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE Q&A: Meuse, Prinzivalli & Robertson Talk TRAFFICIn “Government”STATE REP RACE Q&A: Pina Prinzivalli Discusses Economic Development, Opioid EpidemicIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Meuse Says She’s The Best Person For The Job, Not Just “That Other Candidate”In “Government”last_img read more

Juba League leader electrocuted in Bagerhat

first_imgbagerhatA local leader of Juba League was electrocuted on Thursday in his house at Bahirdia village in Fakirhat upazila in the district.The deceased was Md Farid Mallik, 45, son of Mazid Mollik of Bahirdia village and an ward-level leader of Juba League.Officer-in-charge of Fakirhat police station Abu Zahid Sheikh said Farid got electrocuted in the afternoon when he was trying to repair an electric motor of his house.He was rushed to Upazila Health Complex where physicians declared him dead, he said.last_img

16yearold to perform Kuchipudi

first_imgTalented 16-year-old Sanjana Jain, disciple of Dr Raja Radha Reddy and Kaushalya Reddy’s will perform at her Rangpravesam at Kamani auditorium in the national Capital on Monday. Initiated into classical dance at a tender age of nine, Sanjana Jain has now blossomed into a full-fledged artist, ready to perform the Kuchipudi Rangapravesam. Rangapravesam is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘debut’. Ranga means ‘stage’ and Pravesam means entry. 16-year-old Sanjana is the disciple of Dr Raja Radha and Kaushalya Reddy and has done over 40 performances in India and overseas. She will begin her performance with Saraswati Vandana written by great and eminent Hindi Poet Suryakanth Tripathi Nirala for worldwide peace, prosperity, progress and fraternity.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’This will be followed by Mandari Jatiswaram, Krishna Shabdam and Payo Ji Maine Ram Ratandhan Payo. She will also perform on Dev Stuti, a musical composition as an ode in praise of Goddess Parvathi, which will be followed by Tarangam based on Raag Mohan and Taal Adi. The Tarangam marks the climax of a traditional Kuchipudi recital. It depicts famous stories of Krishna’s childhood. This item ends with a display of exquisite virtuosity as the dancers execute intricate footwork patterns by dancing on the rim of a brass plate and coordinate them with complicated rhythmic patterns.Sanjana strives to continue this endeavour and achieve greater levels of merit in this field with the same drive and devotion. Speaking about her Rangapravesam, Sanjana says, “To do justice to the art, lucid imagination and long hours of practice is required to alter between different spaces to bring forth messages through abhinaya, facial expressions, and nritya, pure dance movement.last_img read more

Beauty is only skin deep

first_imgMonsoon is here with the heavy downpour and a host of problem for hair and skin. During this damp season people tend to ignore their skin without realizing that often, increase in the humidity causes more damage to the skin. Remember that skin cells turnover increases during summer leading to the pile up of dead skin by the time monsoon begins. After bearing extreme heat leading to tans and itchy skin during the sweaty and stinky summer days, the arrival of Monsoon gives a sigh of relief.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Make sure to exfoliate the skin well during this season. For this we can use the light, oil-free moisturizer that has lactic or kojic acid. During monsoon the strange and sudden increase in humidity make the skin oily, dry and dehydrated. This happens due to change in the ph level of the skin which makes it unstable. Hence it is very essential to take care of our skins during this season to look fresh and beautiful. It’s very easy for dust particles to settle down on the skin during monsoon which eventually damages the soft toned skin. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix Thus in order to avoid the harsh treatment of moist rainy weather follow some tips suggested by Dermatologist Dr Meghna Gupta to make your skin healthy in the monsoons –Follow the basic mantra of CTM (cleansing, toning and moisturizing).Keep the skin moist and wash it regularly to get rid of excess oil and dirt.Soap free cleansers and scrubs are to be used to maintain the soft texture of the skin.After cleansing toning is needed, alcohol free toners are suggested as high humidity could open up the skin pores.  A good anti bacterial toner will go a long way to prevent skin infections and eruptions.Many people stop using sunscreens as the weather becomes cool but do not stop using it even if it is cloudy.Facial and bleaching make the skin rough, thus try to avoid them.Heavy makeup is a blunder during this season. You can use soothing balms or light moisturizers that does not stick on your face to make you feel light.After moisturising the skin, use exfoliating gels or creams containing folic acids AHA and BHA.One thing apart from everything is to drink plenty of water as much as you can during monsoon to make the skin look good and flawless.Regularly clean the skin and use vegetal exfoliate to lock the skin pores.If prone to acne this is a bad season, wash the skin with a good cleanser continuously to avoid extra oil.One can also use home made scrubs for cleansing made up of chick-pea flour (commonly called besan ) mixed up with honey, milk, lemon that rejuvenate the skin and leaves it look glowing and fresh.Waxing, pedicure and manicure is always recommended, as they  clean the skin leaving the skin looking well-toned, glowing and soft.last_img read more