TIR CHONAILL GAELS AND DUNGLOE GAA CLUBS LAUNCH CHARITY CYCLE IN MEMORY OF THE LATE BRID CARR

first_imgTir Chonaill Gaels and An Clochan Liath GAA clubs have teamed up to launch a lung busting 100km Charity Cycle in memory of the late Brid Carr, who died from ovarian cancer last year. The eagerly awaited announcement of the CLG An Clochan Liath cycle team for the 100km Letterkenny to Carrick (Via Ballybofey- Donegal Town – Killybegs ) charity cycle on September 12th has been released by team manager Gerard Pat Boyle and lead rider Eamon McGee. Gerard and Eamon have reserved their right to nominate the final two riders as wild cards in the final weeks leading up to the cycle.Donegal Daily can reveal that former Dungloe GAA star John Fred is favourite for one of these places as he was spotted dropping off a bag at Gerard’s house on Tuesday.It hasn’t been confirmed but local sources believe the bag contained cash. The team’s selection includes representatives from the executive, senior team, reserves, ladies , underage managers, supporters and critics.The 15 names released who will team up with the Tir Conail Gaels cycle team on the 12th September include:1. Gerard Boyle2. Adrian Alcorn3. Brendan McGee4. Eamonn McGee5. Patrick McGowan6. Brendan McCole7. Shaun Boyle8. Owen Bonner9. Joe Boyle10. Myles Sweeney11. Daniel Walsh12. HughieMc Ginley13. John Ham14. Shaun Sharkey15. Raymond Pat BoyleThe event is hoping to raise funds for Ovarian Cancer awareness and research and will honour the memory of Brid Carr who passed away late last year.Brid Carr was diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer in December 2010 shortly before her 51st Birthday.She was originally from Glencolmcille, Co Donegal but lived in London with her husband Seamus and their three children – Christina, Anna and Tom.Brid trained as a nurse in The Mater Hospital in Dublin and then moved to Great Ormond Street Childrens Hospital in London where she was Urology Nurse Specialist.Brid was of great assistance to club members of CLG An Clochan Liath whose children attended Great Ormond Street Hospital, and for this reason the club had no hesitation in supporting the fundraising efforts in her memory. She passed away on 11th October 2014 at age 54.The link between Tir Chonaill Gaels and An Clochan Liath has spanned five decades, founder member of the gaels Jackie Greene came from sheskinrone.Past players from Dungloe to play with TCG include Donal Boyle, Jamsie Mc Cready, Joe Neely, Shaun Campbell , John Paul Mutley and currently Adrian Hanlon.John Duffy from Meenmore served as the Gaels PRO during the seventies and eighties. Any Business or individual wanting to make a donation can approach any member of the team or contact – Gerard Pat Boyle  (086) 602 7161TIR CHONAILL GAELS AND DUNGLOE GAA CLUBS LAUNCH CHARITY CYCLE IN MEMORY OF THE LATE BRID CARR was last modified: July 31st, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:newsSportlast_img read more

Job Vacancies: Bank nurses/midwives required for Letterkenny University Hospital

first_imgSaolta University Health Care Group are now inviting applications from registered nurses or midwives, to join the Nursing Bank at Letterkenny University Hospital.A recruitment panel will be created for Nursing/Midwifery Bank, positions at Letterkenny University Hospital. All positions are 6 month temporary positions, assigned to the Nursing Bank, with the flexibility of working either part time (minimum of 11.5 hours per week) or full time.A short listing and interview process will take place.Minimum requirements: Current registration with The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (NMBI) as a Registered Nurse or Midwife.Closing Date: Friday 28th October 2016 Informal enquiries to: Geraldine Gallagher, Bank Co-ordinator, 074 9125888 ext.4421/086 0224237Please send 3 copies of CV to: Ann Faracli, HR Department, Letterkenny University Hospital, Co. Donegal. Tel: 074 9123584, or alternately by email: ann.faracli@hse.ieJob Vacancies: Bank nurses/midwives required for Letterkenny University Hospital was last modified: October 18th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Shock as trees cut and stolen from scenic forest walk

first_imgAn attack on a local scenic area in which up to 20 semi-mature trees were cut down has been described as “senseless and shocking.”The trees were hacked down last weekend at Drumboe Woods in the Twin Towns.A major investment was made turning the woods into an area which could be enjoyed by the local community recently with pathways and signage as well as the planting of more trees. Coillte is aware of the attack on the woods and is investigating the reasons for the cutting of the trees which were also taken from the forest.Local county councillor Patrick McGowan said he is very annoyed by the incident considering the work which has gone into developing Drumboe Woods in recent months.“This is a shocking and senseless attack on what is a beautiful area which is enjoyed by so many people.Some of the many trees cut down during an attack in Drumboe Woods at the weekend.“We have a Tidy Towns meeting tomorrow night and we will discuss it but it’s just an attack on the whole community. “I would appeal to anybody who was in the woods in recent days and who may have seen people cutting down trees of acting suspiciously to contact the Gardai.“These are our woods and they are there for all of us to enjoy and something like this cannot be allowed to happen again,” he said.Shock as trees cut and stolen from scenic forest walk was last modified: August 28th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CoilltecutdonegalDrumboe Woodsstolentreestwin townslast_img read more

Alexandra theatre festival lauds women directors

first_imgDirectors have been running rehearsals for the Women’s Theatre Festival productions.(Image: Olive Tree Theatre)MEDIA CONTACTS• Kerryn IrvinOlive Tree Theatre: Producer+27 11 079 4153Sulaiman PhilipMokgoro Ntshieng, creative director of the Olive Tree Theatre, is passionate about her art form and its ability to transform society. She believes that if given an opportunity to tell your story, you can change perceptions.In South African theatre, women’s voices have been muted, so she and her business partner, producer Kerryn Irvin, have chosen four female directors for their inaugural Women’s Theatre Festival.The festival, from 25 to 27 October, will give female directors a platform and opportunity to show off their skills. Talented and passionate women, Ntshieng argues, hit a ceiling and then are lost to the arts due to a lack of opportunity.“It’s unfortunately true but directing is a very masculine world. The opportunity for women to tell their own stories, from the perspective of women, was the seed for this festival.”Ntshieng and Irvin put out a very limited call to friends and associates and within days they had 25 submissions, which they whittled down to just four directors; who will present their work at the theatre.“There is a need, a thirst for women directors to be given opportunities,” says Irvin.Women directors’ voicesNkoto Malybye, a drama lecturer at Tshwane University of Technology, is directing her own Lerato la Daddy, about the pitfalls of a creative life told through the eyes of a Christian father of four daughters.“As my lead says ‘Music is spiritual, the music business is not.’ I have found as a woman that my opportunities are very limited so it was important for me to be involved in this festival.”Malybye has a background in community theatre in Mpumalanga province and is aware of theatre’s power as an educational tool. Her desire to be involved in the festival – “I told them I would be happy to do anything” – stems from her belief that theatre can change perceptions.“African women deal with this idea that strong women are rebellious and need to be tamed. It’s a belief that even women have accepted. We need to change this idea that we are just meant to be pretty, silent baby makers. This festival is a chance for us to dispel that message, for our voices to be heard.”Alexandra resident Nothemba Sulupha chose to direct a work – Wombman – she wrote specifically for the festival. Her play centres on an infertile nurse at a“How she copes is the surprise you must come to the theatre to discover.”Sulupha believes it’s important that festivals like this are held. “It’s an opportunity for women to tell their own stories and hopefully gives us a chance to have a dialogue about the female experience in South Africa.”Denel Honeyball fell in love with the theatre when she saw a production of Jack and the Beanstalk as a four year old. For her, participating in the festival is about bringing theatre to the community.“It’s a safe place to open the discussion about the social issues we face as a country. It allows our imagination to travel down paths that we would not otherwise to find solutions that are inclusive.”Honeyball is directing three short humorous pieces by Italian playwright Franca Rame.“Sometimes the best way to think about things is to laugh about them … rather than to depress and teach.”She believes it’s far more important to make theatre accessible to as many people as possible rather than to be caught up in making sure they get the right message.“Yes most theatre organisations are run by men, but that’s a legacy of our past. I look at the audiences and see young people eager to be entertained. This audience is open to watching productions by and about women. That’s important because that’s how you change the future without becoming caught up in the present.”Diamond Mokoape is the most experienced director at the festival and has chosen to do This is for Keeps, a South African classic written by Vanessa Cooke, Danny Keogh and Janice Honeyman. Mokoape has updated the 1983 Market Theatre Laboratory work for a township audience.“It’s about the inelegance of the fool’s gold of a relationship built on violence and loathing. Theatre forces you to confront the truth about abuse. It’s such an intimate experience you can’t look away, you can’t ignore the action. This is what makes theatre such a powerful medium.”Township theatreThe festival faced a funding crisis from the outset but Irvin and Ntshieng were determined to hold it in Alexandra, a township north east of Gauteng’s Johannesburg city centre. Beyond giving a platform to female directors, the pair felt it was just as important to bring the theatre experience to the Alexandra residents.“An option we discounted early on was to hold the festival at the National School of the Arts in Braamfontein (Johannesburg). We applied for grants and approached local businesses to help with the funding which we eventually managed to scrape together,” says Irvin.The Olive Tree Theatre is housed in a warehouse at the Yarona Centre, a shopping mall in Alexandra. Inside, you’ll find young creative people drawn from the local community.“With the actors doing stretching exercises it looks like a yoga studio but the energy and excitement is so real and refreshing. We want to give these people a place to be creative, to try out identities safely,” Irvin explains.The partners have plans to begin a children’s theatre festival and hold exhibitions of artwork created in Alexandra. First, however, Ntshieng hopes the Women’s Theatre Festival will lead to a theatre renaissance in Alexandra and draw in a new audience.“South Africa has such a rich history of community theatre, especially liberation theatre, but we want to create a space for the community where they can see well-told lovely stories.”last_img read more

Emergency Energy Conservation Saves a School

first_imgAs an avid environmentalist with a casual awareness of the importance of energy conservation when I entered college in the 1970s, a chance situation clarified for me just how much energy could be saved through strong, concerted effort. Sometime in 1974 or ’75 (those years tend to run together for me for some reason), the transformer serving Ithaca College blew up.The initial blackout was remedied after a day or two when the utility company hooked up an emergency transformer that could be used until the replacement was built–which was expected to take three months. (Large transformers are typically built to order; utility companies don’t have back-ups sitting on a shelf.) But this emergency transformer was one-third the size of the original–necessitating drastic conservation efforts on campus. I must have had a reputation for environmental activism, because I was tapped for an emergency response committee to coordinate student energy conservation efforts.The situation was pretty dire. We had to cut electricity demand by two-thirds, and I remember the facilities manager warning us that students on a single floor of one dorm might be able to intentionally blow the undersized temporary transformer if they all turned on their lights at the same time. Such an action, we were told, would create a sudden surge in electricity use that would be too rapid for the facilities manager to respond to, and it could overtax the temporary transformer, causing it to fail.As I think back on this, I’m pretty sure that those warnings were greatly exaggerated; other loads on campus would dwarf those of lighting on one floor of a dorm. But the warnings were effective in mobilizing campus-wide action. Our campus energy conservation committee photocopied fliers about energy savings. We made up placards and posted them next to the light switches in all of the college classrooms, urging students and faculty to use only necessary lighting and to turn off lights when leaving the room. We policed buildings to turn off unnecessary lights.I’m sure that the vast majority of the emergency conservation efforts were focused on large loads, such as chillers, packaged air conditioning systems, and gymnasium lighting, but the response by the entire campus community–students, faculty, and staff–demonstrated to me just how significant coordinated efforts could be in saving energy. It was a great opportunity not only to solve an immediate problem–preventing a blackout that could shut down the school for several months–but also get significant, across-the-board buy-in to the benefits of energy conservation. (This wasn’t long after the first Energy Crisis, when an embargo of Mideast petroleum dramatically drove up the price of oil and put energy on the radar screen for Americans.)And, the efforts were successful. Ithaca College was able to hold off another transformer failure during that several-month period. The experience has stuck with me throughout a career that has always focused on energy conservation as a cornerstone of responsible environmental policy. And, I suppose that that transformer failure in the 1970s, and our efforts to reduce electrical demand by two-thirds, set the stage for this weekly blog–the 100th installment of which you are now reading.I invite you to share comments on this blog.Alex Wilson is the executive editor of Environmental Building News and founder of BuildingGreen, LLC. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feeds.last_img read more

Is Your Email List Healthy? Take This 5-Question Sniff Test

first_img Email Lists and Segmentation Originally published Mar 20, 2012 1:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Email list are like milk — they’re perishable. In fact, rotten email lists can leave you a lot worse than just queasy. Bad email lists can make it nearly impossible for your messages to get into your prospects’ inboxes. Return Path reports that 83% of the time an email address is not delivered to an inbox, the sender’s reputation (defined by the sender score ) is to blame. And what makes a bad sender score? Sending emails that get marked as spam, which is exactly what happens when you send to bad lists. Sniff Test for Email? It’s pretty easy to identify bad milk; but what about bad email lists?Turns out they’re not so tough to spot either. Generally speaking, a bad email list is one where many of the recipients are not expecting and do not want your email.Of course, that’s pretty general, so how do you get more specific? At HubSpot, we ask a series of five questions to every customer who uploads a list to our email tool . The questions, listed below, constitute our basic email list sniff test.(Note that we ask these questions about lists that are uploaded to HubSpot but not lists created from leads collected by customers with HubSpot forms  or our leads API . That’s because we assume that if the leads are collected by the customer using a HubSpot form or the leads API, the contact has a recent business relationship with the customer and is expecting to receive email.)So without further ado, here’s the test:  1) Does everybody on this list have a prior relationship with your business? Yes? Move on to the next question. No? Get rid of the list — or at least the people you don’t have a relationship with. Pronto. If the person doesn’t have a prior relationship with your business, they’re not going to be expecting your email. Not only is emailing them just spammy, but it will also hurt you. Without a prior relationship, many of the recipients will mark your message as spam. Those spam designations will then turn around and hurt the sender score of the servers you send from, which will make it harder for you to get your messages delivered. 2) Do you have an unsubscribe list? Yes? Nice job! On to the next question … No? Do not pass go; do not send to list. Go back to the drawing board, and build a new list. Every list should be accompanied by an unsubscribe list. Here’s why: If you have a prior email relationship with the people on your list, you will inevitably have people who have unsubscribed from said list. When you load that list into a system like HubSpot, you need to load both the master list and the unsubscribe (AKA suppression) list. If you don’t, you’re going to end up emailing people who have already unsubscribed. That’s against the law , and, since people on the unsubscribe list are likely to mark your email as spam, it will also reduce your ability to send successful emails. 3) Did you purchase, rent, or lease the list from a third party? No? Excellent! Next question! Yes? Agh! No dice. We can’t let you send to that list from HubSpot — and it’s unlikely you’ll have success sending to the list from any other quality, reputable marketing software solution. Why? It’s pretty simple: The people on that list do not have a prior business relationship with you. At best, they gave their address to somebody else and are expecting email from them , not you. At worst, their address was harvested from some sort of directory, and they’re not expecting any type of email. Any sending you do to this list will get flagged for spam and ultimately reduce your future conversion rates. 4) Will the people on the list be expecting (not surprised by) your email? Yes? Awesome. One more question. No? Game over. Time to do some more inbound marketing to build yourself a clean and quality list of recent opt-ins. Which leads us to our final question … 5) Have you emailed these contacts within the last 12 months? Yes? You’re good to go. Your list is smelling great. Create some awesome emails with super useful content, and you’ll have yourself some amazing conversion rates. No? Sorry. Twelve months is a long time. Chances are, a big chunk of your list already forgot about you and will be surprised by your message (remember question #4?). That means they’ll mark it as spam, which means your delivery rates will drop.  How to Create Lists That Don’t Stink — And Keep Them That Way So what’s the best way to create lists that won’t get marked as spam? By building your own list with remarkable content that drives traffic to your site, and then entices them to opt in to your emails with compelling marketing offers (that are clearly associated with your business) on your site and well-optimized landing pages. (This ebook, An Introduction to Lead Generation , will help you get started.)Here at HubSpot, we build our list with offers like content and tools, including  webinars , ebooks , and Marketing Grader . By building these lists internally, we’ve made our email marketing program far more productive that it would have been if we had purchased lists.So how do you keep your list smelling good? Good list hygiene . On a general level, that means keeping an ongoing email relationship with your list so recipients are always expecting your messages. More specifically, that means sending to them at a predictable cadence , making unsubscribes easy, maintaining reliable unsubscribe lists and, perhaps most importantly, continuing to grow your list organically. So, what do you think? Do your email lists pass the sniff test? And are we missing anything on our sniff test?  Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

When to Use Static vs. Dynamic Lists in Email Marketing

first_img Topics: Originally published Jun 13, 2012 12:30:00 PM, updated August 29 2017 In email marketing, the success of your messages is largely dependent on the quality of your list. And although we’ve talked a bunch about list segmentation and list health on this blog (have you taken our email list sniff test yet?), there’s still more you should understand about lists. (Who knew the topic of email lists could be so darn extensive?)What we’re referring to in this post is the concept of static lists vs. dynamic lists . Do you understand the distinction? It might sound simple, but we’re surprised by how many marketers really don’t know the difference — and when to use one or the other, for that matter. We’ll keep this lesson to the point so you can once and for all understand what distinguishes one list from the other, and start applying the right uses of each to your email marketing programs. What Are Static Lists? Quite simply, static lists are, well … static. These lists consist only of contacts you’ve accumulated up until the point when you create the list, and they remain unchanged unless you manually add or remove contacts. Static lists can either be created using contacts that already exist in your database, or through a manual upload to your email tool. Typically, they’re created through the latter method, as oftentimes they consist of contacts that were gathered through offline methods or other online campaigns not connected to interactions on your website. HubSpot’s email tool , for example, allows users to create static lists in both of these ways, as you can see from the screenshots below. When to Use Static Lists in Email Marketing Of all the types of email a marketer can send , static lists are generally good for one-off email sends, email campaigns that you run infrequently, and for lists of contacts that don’t change often. Here are a few examples of when you’d want to use a static list in your email marketing: Event Registrants, Attendees, or No-Show Lists: No one can travel back in time to register for or attend your event in the past, right? That’s why event lists tend to be ones that remain static. You might use these lists to send follow-up information or content post-event, whether it’s an in-person event or an online one like a webinar. Staff Lists: Do you send a quarterly newsletter to your company’s board of directors? How about an internal one to your business’ employees? These are lists of people that don’t typically change often, and you’ll probably also have to manually update them anyway. Trade Show Lists: Did you snag some prospects’ contact information from your presence at a trade show or another industry conference/event? This is a great use case for a static list upload. What Are Dynamic Lists? Dynamic email lists, on the other hand, are lists that constantly evolve as certain criteria are met. This criteria could include a specific property (e.g. contacts from a specific state or contacts from a specific industry), members of other lists (i.e. a list combining other lists!), or contacts who completed certain landing page forms . New contacts get added as they meet the criteria set for the list, and furthermore, dynamic lists will also remove people who no longer meet that criteria. Get it? Dynamic. These lists are powered by data and intelligence that can be collected by your marketing software or CRM as well as through interactions contacts have on your website, such as downloading content or visiting certain web pages. Dynamic lists are also critical for slicing and dicing your database into various segments for more effective and relevant email marketing .You’ll need to consult your email software provider to see if dynamic lists are part of its services available to you. To understand how they work, below is an example of a dynamic list in the making in HubSpot’s Contacts and Email tools . In our tool, we call these dynamic lists ‘Smart Lists.’ Here, we’re generating a segmented list of contacts who have Twitter follower counts of 1,000 or more. Once this list is established, as more of our contacts’ Twitter follower counts grow and meet that 1,000-follower threshold, the list will also grow. In addition, any contact whose follower count dips below 1,000 will automatically be removed from the list. So if we wanted to put some extra social media promotional muscle behind a particular piece of content or marketing offer, we might use this list to send an email to the contacts in our database with the greatest Twitter reach. Email Lists and Segmentation Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack When to Use Dynamic Lists in Email Marketing Dynamic lists are best used for email campaigns in which you plan on sending email more than once to a certain list of contacts that changes and gets updated frequently. As time goes on, your dynamic list would automatically adjust to your changing volume of contacts. This saves you the time from creating a new list every time you want to email that segment and keeps the list fresh and up to date in real time. Here are some examples of when you’d want to use a dynamic list in your email marketing: Customer List: Keeping your customers in the know with a monthly newsletter about your newest product tutorials, features, and other updates? New customers come, and (unfortunately), some go, so a dynamic customer list will enable you to automatically include new customers — and exclude ex-customers — on your next newsletter send. Free Trial Users: Use a dynamic list to send ongoing tips about how to get the most out of your company’s free product trial. This way, new contacts who start a free trial get automatically looped in the next time you send an email of tips to this list. Block Lists:  Dynamic lists can also be used to suppress certain contacts and protect recipients from receiving too many emails. For instance, you could create a dynamic list of anyone who has already signed up for an event, and block that continually updating list from future sends designed to promote the very same event. Interest-Based Lists: Create an evolving list of everyone who downloaded content on a particular topic, then make sure your emails to that list match that interest category.When it comes to dynamic lists, the possibilities really are plentiful — and powerful. Just think of all the very targeted email you could send! In what ways are you using dynamic lists to improve email segmentation ? Image Credit: adamentmeat last_img read more

The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Subscriber Email

first_img Originally published Jan 6, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 When was the last time you paid any attention to your blog subscriber emails? “My blog subscriber emails? I’m pretty sure those just … get sent, right?”Probably. For many marketers, subscriber emails were likely something you configured when you first launched your blog — never to be thought about again.If this sounds familiar and you’re treating your blog subscriber email like just another automated email you set and forgot, you could be missing out on a wealth of opportunity. Not to blame you, though. Most automated blog subscriber emails from software are nothing to write home about. In fact, HubSpot’s own software only recently, with the launch of our new Blog tool on HubSpot’s new COS, started giving customers the ability to truly customize their blog subscriber emails.But if you do have the ability to customize these emails, they’re definitely an important asset to leverage. After all, depending on how often you blog and how many email subscribers you have, these emails go out to quite a few of your contacts on a regular basis. Are you making the most of all their potential?Using the HubSpot software’s own blog email capabilities as our prototype, let’s dissect the anatomy of an optimized subscriber email so you can identify areas for improvement in your own emails.The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Subscriber Email1) Recognizable Sender NameMake sure your sender name makes it clear to recipients who the email is from. This is likely the first thing your subscribers notice about your email notifications, so if it’s not immediately evident to them that your email is from a known sender, your emails might end up straight in the trash.In HubSpot’s case, because multiple sections make up our blog, we use “HubSpot Blog” followed by the name of the particular section the contact is subscribed to as our sender name. This makes it easy for recipients to identify that the email is coming from, say, the marketing section of HubSpot’s blog.2) Clear, Catchy Subject LineBecause your email’s subject line is the most critical factor in whether your recipients decide to even open your email in the first place, make sure you give it ample thought.Considering your subscriber emails are most likely automated and triggered every time you publish a new post, a great approach here is to simply use the title of the blog post as your subject line — if your software enables you to do so like HubSpot’s does. Knowing this, make sure you take the subscriber email into consideration when you’re crafting your blog post titles.And be sure to avoid lengthy titles — 50 characters or fewer will ensure the subject line doesn’t get cut off in most email clients, particularly for mobile users. Also, make sure the title is catchy and interesting while also clearly indicating what the content is about. Misleading titles may get you the initial click, but over time, they will lead to the loss of subscribers’ trust — and ultimately, an increase in unsubscribes.3) Enticing Preview Text If your software enables you to customize the preview text of your email, this is another great opportunity to increase opens of your subscriber emails.The preview text is the copy that appears immediately following the subject line of your email. Use this real estate to further clarify what your recipients are getting and get them excited about what’s inside. Remind them that this is a notification email about your awesome new blog post and entice them to open it with some creative copy. But again, keep it brief! 4) Responsive Template Your email recipients are reading their emails on various devices, operating systems, and email clients — desktops, smartphones, tablets, iOS, Android, Gmail, Outlook — you name it! This means that in order to send effective blog subscriber emails, they should be optimized for each and every one of these different platforms. That’s where responsive email templates come in handy.A responsive template will automatically adjust to suit your email recipients’ individual situations — whether they’re using Gmail on a desktop, an Android smartphone, an iPad, or any other combination of software.So, if you have access to responsive email templates, use them! (Note: HubSpot’s Email tool has a variety of responsive templates to choose from and customize). If not, make sure you at least keep mobile email optimization best practices in mind when you’re designing your blog subscriber emails.5) Logo/Branding Now, on to the body of the email itself. Remember, getting your subscribers to open the email is only half the battle. The true goal is to get them to click through to the post itself. First things first: Incorporate some branding, such as your company’s logo, near the top of your email. This reassures subscribers that your email is coming from a trusted sender and adds some consistency to your blog notification emails.For instance, in HubSpot’s own blog subscriber emails, we use the same banner (with the addition of the HubSpot sprocket logo) that appears at the top of the section of the HubSpot blog the email is associated with.6) Personalization Greet your subscribers by name! If your blog software is connected to your contacts database, chances are you may know at least the names of many of your blog subscribers. Use it to your advantage and make your subscriber emails a little bit more personal using dynamic tags. Just be sure to set a default value for this dynamic tag for those people whose names are not in your contacts database.7) Introduction/Greeting You can also introduce your latest post and let your brand’s personality shine through with a quick, friendly greeting. Just keep in mind that, because your blog notification emails are automated, this greeting can easily get stale to recipients over time. If you’re going to incorporate a greeting, try to remember to switch it up every once in a while. 8) Clickable Blog TitleProminently display the title of the blog post you’re emailing about, and make sure it’s hyperlinked to the post itself. (If you’re using HubSpot’s new Blog tool, the title of your post is automatically pulled in to your email and hyperlinked for you.) This is exactly what your subscribers are looking for — and the main point of your email — so you want to make sure it’s easy to find to encourage clickthroughs.And as we mentioned earlier, when you’re brainstorming the title of your blog post, keep in mind how critical it is for generating clickthroughs from not only your emails, but also promotion in other channels like social media. For help with blog title generation, check out this simple formula for writing kick-ass titles. 9) Post Preview Some subscribers may need a little more convincing that your new post is worth the read before they decide to click through on your email. This is where the post preview comes in handy.Depending on the capabilities of your software, this is a good place to either provide a quick summary/description of your post or include the first few sentences of the post itself to draw readers in and entice them to click for more. Feel free to experiment with both to determine which generates more clickthroughs.If you’re using HubSpot’s new blog subscriber emails, you can choose to either show the post in full or just the content appearing before the “Read More Separator” (which you can set) in the post itself. Since the goal of your email is likely to drive subscribers back to your blog so they can explore not only this particular post but also your other content, I strongly recommend the latter. 10) Compelling Image and Alt TextUse the power of visual content to make your subscriber emails even more clickable by including a compelling, relevant image in your post preview. Not only will this help draw in the eye, but it will also make your emails more sharable, increasing the likelihood recipients will forward it to others and expand the reach of your blog content. And don’t forget to add relevant alt text for those recipients who either choose not to enable images in their email clients or whose email clients don’t support it. If you’re using HubSpot’s new blog notification emails, keep in mind that the image in your email will automatically get pulled in from your blog post if it’s included before the Read More Separator in the post itself. As such, you’ll need to add your alt text to the image in the post (not the email) and choose compelling images for your posts as you’re writing them. The good news is this is not only a best practice for email, but also for the social shareability of your blog content in general.11) “Read More” Call-to-ActionWe know every effective marketing email has a clear call-to-action (CTA), so how does this translate to your blog subscriber emails? Well, if you’re main goal is to drive subscribers back to your website where they can read the article you’re emailing about (and hopefully other articles), make sure that next step is crystal clear!After your post preview, include a call-to-action for recipients to read the full article on your blog. Experiment with the copy of this text link to see what generates more clickthroughs, and if your software allows, try a more prominent button CTA instead.(Tip for HubSpot COS Users: You can use HTML to display your “Read More” CTA copy more prominently, using styling like bolded text or headers.)12) Secondary CTAsThis begs the question — should you include any secondary CTAs in your blog subscriber emails? What about a CTA promoting an offer relevant to the content of the post? You know, for lead generation? To be honest, this depends on your particular goals and the type of secondary CTA you plan to use.If the goal of your blog subscriber emails is to drive traffic to your blog, then it’d probably be wise to forego any competing CTAs that might interfere. If your goal is to use these emails as another source of lead generation, feel free to experiment with secondary lead gen CTAs.For HubSpot’s own blog subscriber emails, our main goal is to drive subscribers back to our blog, so we chose to exclude lead gen CTAs. However, we do include a CTA for subscribers to download our free Newsstand app, enabling them to read our blog content optimized for their iPad — a complementary, but not competing offer.You’ll also notice that our “update your email preferences or subscribe to other sections” anchor text link is a CTA in and of itself. We have this there as a way to make sure subscribers know their options, save them from unsubscribing, and promote the other sections on our blog.  13) Social Media Follow Buttons Not every post you email is going to tickle your subscribers’ fancy. Maybe your blog is about unicorn care, and one of your subscribers is already an expert unicorn dietician. While your introductory post about unicorn diet may not be something she feels is worth the read, that doesn’t mean she has to go away empty-handed.For instance, is she following your company on Twitter yet? How about Facebook? A form of secondary CTAs, social media follow buttons are a great way to engage and nurture blog subscribers in other channels, and increase your overall social reach. Configure these buttons for the social networks in which your company actively maintains a presence.14) Footer Last but not least, customize your email’s footer. The most critical component of your footer is CAN-SPAM compliancy, so be sure to include your company’s physical mailing address and a clear unsubscribe link.You can also use your footer as an opportunity to save a few unsubscribes by reminding subscribers that they can always modify their current email preferences if they’re receiving too much email.HubSpot’s new blog subscriber emails enable you to offer subscription via an instant, daily, weekly, or monthly frequency, so if instant emails are overwhelming your subscribers, you’ll want them to know they have other frequency options before choosing to unsubscribe altogether.How else can you customize — and optimize — your blog subscriber emails? Share your tips in the comments!  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email Lists and Segmentation Topics:last_img read more

7 Times You’ll Kick Yourself for Not Learning HTML

first_img Originally published Jan 8, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Website Development Topics: Why Learn HTML?HTML and CSS are the basic programming languages for web development and design. They are beneficial to learn for developers, marketers, and people in many other disciplines. Learning HTML can be used for situations like formatting a blog or email, working with a CMS, embedding external content on your site, and creating usable content.I don’t know about you, but when I travel, I’m terrified of leaving something at home. I obsess over making sure I have enough T-shirts, jeans, shoes, travel-sized shampoos, earrings, books, magazines — because what in the world would I do if I didn’t have them, but needed them? And even if I over-pack, I know I’m prepared for any situation vacation will throw at me — a random fancy dinner out, a day at the pool, or just an afternoon out shopping with the family.In the same vein, knowing HTML is like making sure you’re fully prepared for a vacation. You may not end up using it every single day, but the times you do end up using it, you are so grateful that you had the foresight to figure it out. Knowing HTML can save you hours of frustration, precious time with your design team, or even money dealing with an external contractor.HTML has always been nice-to-have knowledge, but it’s becoming more than nice-to-have for the marketer trying to save a buck. (And that sounds like every marketer I’ve met.)In fact, there are a bunch of situations I’ve caught myself in in which handy HTML knowledge saved the day … and thus, this post was born. If you’re not quite convinced that you’d benefit from knowing basic HTML, keep reading. Here are seven* scenarios you might find yourself in that can be fixed with just a bit of HTML know-how. 1) When Formatting in Your Blog Post/Email/Landing Page Goes AwrySometimes, I swear my content has a life of its own — and a mean streak. That blog post that I worked on all day will suddenly have images with funky spacing, no text wrapping, and outrageous sizing, and, of course, all looks okay in my WYSIWG editor. Luckily, with some HTML knowledge, I can dig into the post to remove and tweak code that is causing the problem.HTML Pro Tip: If you find a bunch of funky tags you want to remove, copy the raw code and paste it into a raw text editor. Then, choose the Find and Replace option — you can search for offending snippets of code and leave the “replace” box blank. Once you’re done, you can paste it back into your HTML editor, and poof! De-bugged formatting. 2) When You Paste a Blog Post Into Your CMS From Word or Google DocsLots of people don’t know that writing a blog post in a typical word processing program — like Word or Google Docs — and then copying it into your CMS will give you lots of HTML headaches. Sometimes, when you do that, your CMS will add extra snippets of code to your piece that will mess up formatting.With some HTML knowledge and the pro tip above, you can easily remove any offending snippets when transferring content from Word or Google Docs to your CMS.3) When You Need to Tweak an Email TemplateI’m going to take a wild guess that you don’t want every email you send to look exactly the same. While sending consistent emails is a great thing most of the time, there will be specific campaigns you’re going to want to customize emails for. This could be as simple as right-aligning your images instead of left-aligning them or changing up the color of your text to stand out in your subscribers’ inboxes.With HTML knowledge, though, you can make these changes yourself, instead of relying on an in-house designer or hired development shop. Seriously, it’s empowering to make the changes yourself and move on to more pressing marketing matters. 4) When You Need to Make Your Content Easy to ReadOne of your top concerns when creating content is to make it easy for people to consume. This means using formatting (bold, italics, headers, colors, etc.) to make your content scannable and digestible. And while most WYSIWG editors will let you easily apply those formatting options to your content without touching code, not all will. So take control of the way your content looks by souping it up with some and read more

Job Interviews Gone Wrong: 9 Professionals Share Their Most Awkward Stories

first_imgInterviews are vulnerable times.There aren’t many things more nerve-wracking than walking into a room of people you desperately want to impress, and then getting questioned about (and ultimately judged on) your career choices, goals, strengths, weaknesses, and overall personality.And, as if that weren’t bad enough, what if you’ve totally sweat through your shirt and it’s visible to everyone? Or your heel broke on the way to the office? Or you accidentally ordered the messiest dish on the menu?Thanks a lot, Murphy’s Law.Where do you see yourself in five years? Take our free quiz here to figure out the next step in your career.We all have an embarrassing story or two from our job interviews, but some are definitely worse than others.We surveyed professionals about job interviews gone wrong for this article. After laughing a lot — and cringing a lot, too — we chose some of our favorites stories to share with you in this post. (Names and identifying details have been changed.)1) The Open Fly”I was interviewing for a pretty senior level position at a formal company, so I wore a suit. I went to the bathroom before the interview, and while I was pulling the zipper up, it broke. I started freaking out, looking for a pin or something to hold it closed. I found nothing and worked myself up into a pretty big sweat. I walked into the interview red in the face, sweaty, and with an open fly, which I tried to awkwardly conceal by folding my suit jacket over my arm, shielding the view of my pants. They must not have noticed because I got the job! (And also got my pants fixed.)”2) The Miscalculated Hug”In a final round of interviews with a large company, the women in HR who I had been speaking with for the majority of the process invited me into her office to see how my meetings with the hiring managers went. As she started to walk toward me, she began to put her arm up, signaling as if she was about to give me a small nice-to-see-you hug (we had gotten to know each other over the recent weeks). To reciprocate, I started to motion a hug back, until I noticed she was only trying to shut the door behind me. It was extremely awkward. She didn’t call me back afterward.”3) The Mix-Up”Once I went to an interview … and realized mid-way through it was a date. (Enough said.)”4) The White Lie”I was interviewing for a copywriting job at a fashion company. At that point in my life, I was not making very much money at all. (As in, I ate leftovers from my office’s fridge when rent was due at the end of the month.) In my interview with the fashion company, they asked me what kinds of stores I like to shop at — and the truth was that I shopped at cheap department stores because that’s all I could afford at the time. I debated being honest and saying that, but knowing that could jeopardize my chances of getting the job, I ultimately decided to try to lie my way into an acceptable answer. But … then they asked me follow-up questions about each store I named, none of which I’d ever stepped foot into. I fumbled, the interview ended several minutes later, and I didn’t hear from them again.”5) The Totally Bizarre”My senior year of college, I traveled to New York for interviews with an agency through Career Services at my school. My first indication that something was wrong was when no one at the company could tell me when to book my return train, even though my first interview was scheduled for 11:00 a.m. Then, I found out that everyone I spoke to — six or so people — had been there for less than three months, and it was a very small company (15-20 people). “Next, I got the ‘let’s leave the interviewee in the conference room and see what happens’ move. After about five minutes, I stuck my head out and had to go down the hall to find someone, since my next interviewer was nowhere to be seen. I finally found someone — a new guy who was super apologetic — he found the person who was supposed to be interviewing me, who was just hanging out waiting for me to be proactive. Finally, I interviewed with the CEO. I walked into the interview and right off the bat, and he started mocking my ‘little Ivy League suit.’ But everyone in the office was wearing a suit … and they had been recruiting at my school!”From there, it only went downhill. After condescendingly mocking my appearance, he went on to make personal attacks about my family, my previous professional experience, and even my academic choices. It was bizarre and, frankly, psychotic. I walked out almost in tears, but sent follow-up emails to everyone else I interviewed with that day. I got an email back really late on a Friday night from one of the guys who interviewed me, apologizing for the CEO’s behavior and saying he’d be happy to help me get a job elsewhere (since apparently he ‘can be hard on people’). “I ended up withdrawing my candidacy since I couldn’t imagine being a subordinate of someone who was that controlling and awful (because I could only imagine how he treated his employees — if his interview behavior was any indicator). When I withdrew my application I made it very clear that it was due to the behavior of the CEO. He responded saying “Thank you for your message, albeit perplexed as to what you could be referring to. I wish you all the best in your future endeavors!”6) The Forever Intern”I once interviewed for a VP-level position, and the hiring manager asked me to describe each position I held, from first to most recent. I spent only a few seconds detailing my first internship, which I held more than 15 years earlier. Not so fast. He insisted I’d moved on too quickly, and he wanted me to spend more time explaining what I did as an intern. So I took out my resume and read it to him word for word to emphasize the pointlessness of his unweighted process.”7) The Please-Don’t-Pee-My-Pants”Probably the worst interview experience I’ve ever had was at a callback interview. I was meeting with four people, each for 30 minutes. This was my third callback of the week, so I was pretty tired the morning of the interview — and since it was super early in the morning, I went to Panera to get an iced tea before the interview started. I was also kind of starting to lose my voice, so I accepted the water they offered me when I arrived at the office. “After consuming all these liquids, by the time I sat down for my third interview but after we had already begun talking, I realized I really had to pee. I don’t even remember what I said to the interviewer because I was so focused on not peeing my pants. I was bright red, sweating, and kept uncrossing and recrossing my legs. As soon as the 30 minutes were over (thank goodness I made it without a disaster), I immediately asked to use the restroom before my last interview began. It was probably really obvious I had to pee the whole time since I definitely didn’t look so hot. I didn’t get an offer.”8) The Lost Helmet”I once interviewed for a marketing manager position at a company that sells outdoor gear. In keeping with the outdoor theme, I opted to ride my bike to the interview. I got there super early and decided to kill some time reading by the water. I put my bike on its kickstand next to me and hung my helmet on the handlebar. It was SUPER windy that day, and in a total freak occurrence, the wind blew my bike down and my helmet fell into the water! It was like a 20-foot drop down to the water, so there was no retrieving it. The first thing the hiring manager asked when I walked into the store was, ‘You don’t wear a helmet?!’ I tried to explain what happened but it was so outrageous that it sounded like a lie.”9) The Coffee Slip-Up”I was interviewing to become an undergraduate professor at a very traditional, prestigious university. I got there about 25 minutes early so I could look for parking, go to the bathroom, and maybe even get some coffee. It was 7:30 a.m. so nobody was in school yet. I went ahead and bought a small cup of coffee and walked with it towards a table where I could read a newspaper while I waited. Somehow, I spilled half the cup of coffee over my recently bought white blouse.”I had 25 minutes to fix it, so I sprinted to the bathroom and got some water and soap to get it off. I was halfway through washing it out, leaning over the sink in a very ridiculous position, and a lady came in and asks me if  was all right. I told her about my stupid mistake, and how this was a super traditional school so I had dressed up in my suit and white blouse, and so and so forth — I kind of babbled all this at her. Once it looked decent enough (after eventually crawling under the hand dryer to make it dry), I was only five minutes early for my interview. I got in and the interviewer was the same lady that I bumped into the bathroom. My face must have clearly shown my embarrassment because she just laughed. I still got the job.”What’s your worst interview story? Share with us in the comments below!  Interviews Originally published Oct 14, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more