Statement from Vermont Agriculture Secretary Allbee regarding nationwide egg recall

first_imgEnsuring a safe food supply is our top priority here at the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. Accordingly, we protect consumers by maintaining aggressive food safety programs on both the retail and farm levels.‘According to FDA reports, the eggs implicated in this nationwide recall were produced in Iowa. We trust those statements to be true, however to err on the side of caution, our staff of food safety inspectors remain on the lookout for recalled eggs at the retail level. To date, none of the recalled eggs have been found in Vermont, nor have any human cases of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) been reported to the Vermont Department of Health been linked to the recalled eggs.‘As a result of the pro-active work done on Vermont egg farms, coupled with food safety measures taken at the retail level, there have been no human cases of SE related to Vermont produced eggs reported. The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets is committed to this effort to ensure a safe and wholesome product.’Eggs, like meat, poultry, milk, and other foods, are safe when handled properly. Shell eggs are safest when stored in the refrigerator, individually and thoroughly cooked, and promptly consumed. Eggs should be kept refrigerated until they are used.Cooking reduces the number of bacteria present in an egg; however, an egg with a runny yolk still poses a greater risk than a completely cooked egg. Undercooked egg whites and yolks have been associated with outbreaks of SE infections. Both should be consumed promptly and not be kept warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.What are the specific actions I can take to reduce my risk of a SE infection?1. Keep eggs refrigerated.2. Discard cracked or dirty eggs.3. Wash hands, cooking utensils, and food preparation surfaces with soap and water after contact with raw eggs.4. Eggs should be cooked until both the white and the yolk are firm, to a temperature of at least 140 degrees, and eaten promptly after cooking.5. Do not keep eggs warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.6. Refrigerate unused or leftover egg-containing foods promptly.7. Avoid eating raw eggs, especially by young children, elderly persons, and persons with weakened immune systems or debilitating illness.For additional information contact: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/SalmonellaEggs/(link is external)Source: Vt DOAlast_img read more

Syracuse reportedly adds graduate transfer Whisper Fisher from St. Joseph’s

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 21, 2019 at 6:04 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edu Former St. Joseph’s forward Whisper Fisher is reportedly transferring to Syracuse, according to her father, Matthew. Fisher, a graduate transfer, will be able to play immediately.“Whisper is excited about the chance play for coach (Quentin Hillsman),” Matthew said. “He’s one of the best player development and X’s and O’s coaches in the country.”Fisher’s move to SU marks the second transfer of her collegiate career. The Owings Mills, Maryland native played at Loyola Chicago as a freshman, where she appeared in 21 games and averaged less than a point and rebound per game. After sitting out the 2016-17 season due to NCAA transfer rules, Fisher spent two seasons at St. Joseph’s. She logged her best collegiate season in 2018-19, posting 3.8 points and 4.4 rebounds per game. The Hawks went a combined 31-34 in Fisher’s two years on the team.The addition of Fisher, 6-foot-2, will help fill the void left by standout forward Miranda Drummond, who graduated from SU in 2019. Drummond averaged 31.9 minutes and 14.1 points per game in two seasons at Syracuse and holds the Orange’s career 3-point field goal percentage record (40.2 percent).AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more