40 Ways to Get Banned From the Top 5 Social Networks

first_img Social Media Fails Originally published Sep 17, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: It may feel like a fustercluck, but there are actually some rules and regulations that go along with participating in social media. Not the kind that ban people from uploading pictures of their meals (PB&J no crust today guys! #omgsohungry), but the ones that help alleviate things like spamming, bad content, and a poor community experience. You know, the things that help make social media a nice place to be.It’s not a perfect system the social networks have worked out, but it’s important for marketers to know — because believe it or not, lots of marketers are breaking these rules and don’t even know it. And it breaks our hearts to see marketers giving an honest go of social media get banned from the networks … and then not even know why the heck it happened.This post will review the policies the most popular social networks have set up — some more stringent than others — that we think you should be aware of. And we tried to put them in plain English, too, devoid of confusing and boring legal babble. If you’re accidentally breaking any of these rules, at least now you can put the kibosh on your illicit activities before it’s too late!How Marketers Can Get Banned From PinterestIf you’re curious how the newest social network on the block works, we encourage you to read its Terms & Privacy page in full. But for a quick reality check, here are the guidelines marketers should remember when pinning to ensure they stay in Pinterest’s good graces:1) Grabbing another company’s account name. When you open an account on Pinterest, you’re indicating that you are authorized to act on behalf of that company. So if you’re not an employee of that company, you’re not authorized. And if you get caught, you’re not allowed on Pinterest anymore, either.2) Pinning copyrighted content. Any content you post cannot infringe on the rights of the content creator. Make sure it’s either content you’ve created yourself, or content you have a license to share. That means if you’re posting an image from your blog post, that better be copyright-free!3) Automating your Pinterest content. Marketers can’t use an automated service to post content to their pinboards, repin or like other pinners’ content, or create links. All the rewards you reap from Pinterest, in other words, have to come from your own hard work! Note: If you pin a ton of content from one URL all in one sitting — let’s say you just published a blog post with a ton of great images, for example — you may be prompted by Pinterest to verify that you’re not a bot. Just fill it in and keep on keepin’ on.4) Scraping content from Pinterest. On a similar note, you can’t use automation to scrape content from Pinterest. Whether you wanted to use it in blog posts, on your Facebook page, to get a list of links — whatever — you can’t do it. Again, any information or content gathered has to be done manually.5) Scraping for contacts. Any contacts you get from Pinterest have to be opt-ins; as in, they have to come to your site and fill out a form saying they want to hear more from you. Scraping Pinterest for pinners’ personal information so you can market to them later is strictly prohibited.6) Spamming posts. Just like you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of blogs, you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of pins.7) Putting links in the wrong place. Pinterest wants you to include links in your pins so pinners can follow the links to get more information on a pin. But they only want it in the right place. When you pin an image, click ‘Edit,’ where you’ll find a field labeled ‘Link.’ Put your link anywhere else and you may get banned.8) Don’t get banned. If you’ve been banned once, you’re banned for life. Or as Pinterest puts it, “the Service is not available to any users previously removed from the service by Pinterest.” So, tread lightly.How Marketers Can Get Banned From LinkedInLinkedIn’s rules aren’t as stringent as the ones we’ve seen on other social networks — perhaps the B2B playground hasn’t gotten quite so out of hand. You can read LinkedIn’s User Agreement in full, or just browse these highlights that jump out for marketers:1) Connecting with people you don’t know. Seriously! You have to actually know the people you connect with on LinkedIn, or they can boot ya right off!2) Posting copyrighted content to forums. Whether it’s your LinkedIn Group, LinkedIn Company Page, or on LinkedIn Answers, you can’t publish information that violates others’ intellectual property rights. This one won’t get you banned, but LinkedIn can remove the content and close your group or page. Additionally, LinkedIn will terminate the accounts of users who have been “deemed to be repeat infringers under the United States Copyright Act.” You know who you are.3) Using LinkedIn messages as an ESP. LinkedIn messages are not to be used for mass emailing. This constitutes a misuse of service, and can get you kicked off the network.4) Putting links and email addresses where they don’t belong. You get to fill out your profile however you want, as long as it’s accurate. So if you put, say, a link to your blog in, oh I don’t know, the ‘Name’ field … you’re gonna get shut down pretty fast.5) Selling your LinkedIn presence. Built up a pretty big LinkedIn Group? It might be an asset, but you can’t sell it or monetize it in any way if you want to stay on the social network.6) Using bots to get connections, followers, or members. Just like Pinterest and some other social networks we’re about to cover in this blog post, LinkedIn wants you to grow your reach organically.7) Impersonating another company. Another familiar refrain, brands can’t create a fake profile for a competitor to mess around on. You’ll look stupider doing that than they will, anyway.How Marketers Can Get Banned From TwitterThe full list of Twitter “rules” can be found here: The Twitter Rules. Aptly named, eh? Here are the ones that are most likely to apply to marketers so you don’t get banned by that sweet little tweety bird:1) Impersonating others. If you’re impersonating others in an attempt to mislead other Twitter users, Twitter will not be happy. That means no pretending to be a competitor — that’s a low blow move, anyway.2) Snagging trademarked usernames. Another sketchy move is trying to grab your competitor’s username. If they’ve trademarked the name, Twitter will reclaim it from you on their behalf. Twitter will also suspend you if you’re using trademarked logos on your profile.3) Squatting on handles. Ow, that sounds uncomfortable. This means you can’t grab a Twitter username and not use it. Well, you can, but Twitter will just grab it right back if it remains inactive after 6 months. On a related note, you can’t grab a username for the purposes of selling it.4) Buying or selling Twitter usernames. There can be no transactions made around Twitter usernames at all. The penalty is possible permanent suspension from Twitter — for buyers and sellers.5) Giving yourself an unearned Twitter badge. Twitter has little badges for Promoted Products and Verified Accounts. If you use one of these badges anywhere on your profile — including your profile picture or background image — your profile will be suspended.6) Posting the same thing over and over. If you’re trying to get a tweet visibility, you can’t do it by tweeting it like a maniac, particularly if it’s duplicate content tweeted at specific users. Same goes for links — Twitter will penalize you if they see you tweeting the same link over, and over, and over … and over.7) Following people like a bot would. That means you shouldn’t use a bot to manage your following and unfollowing, nor should you act like a bot when manually following and unfollowing people. Aggressive follow and unfollow behavior — particularly seeing a large amount of people followed and/or unfollowed in a short period of time — will signal to Twitter that something’s amiss.8) Getting followers in sketchy ways. Specifically, those “get followers fast!” schemes. It may get you permanently banned from Twitter.9) Hijacking a hashtag or Trending Topic. If there’s a #hashtag or trending topic blowing up Twitter and you want in on the action, you can’t try to hijack it with unrelated content about your brand. If you do, you could feel the wrath of the mighty blue bird mighty soon.10) Posting links with no context. If your updates are just a slew of links with no personal content to give them context, you’ll not only annoy your followers, but Twitter will also want you off their network.11) Getting ratted out. Sometimes the Twitter community self-polices. If a large number of people are blocking you, or your account has received a lot of SPAM complaints, Twitter will boot you. So play nice out there.How Marketers Can Get Banned From Google+If you’re using Google+, there are a couple surprises in here that you might not have considered. You can read their Google+ Policies & Principles in full here, or catch the biggies below:1) Creating fake pages. Yes, it’s prohibited here, too. Big shock. Moving on.2) Running contests. Ooooh, that’s a new one! You cannot run contests, sweepstakes, offers, or coupons directly on your Google+ page, but you can display a link to those promotions that leads people offsite.3) Aggressive Circling. That’s a … weird phrase. But much like you can’t aggressively follow and unfollow people on Twitter without getting flagged, you can’t Circle a ton of people on Google+ without punishment.4) Altering or adding +1 buttons where they don’t belong. Similar to the Twitter badge rule, you can’t, say, superimpose the Google +1 button on an ad. It’s a misleading way to garner clicks.5) Keyword stuffing. Yes, it can happen here, too! Because Google+ is so closely tied with organic search, the penalties are just as stiff. If you’re trying to rank for a keyword, stuffing it into every Google+ update is not the way to do it.6) Marketing regulated products. If you’re marketing in a regulated industry, such as alcohol, tobacco, medical devices, fireworks, pharmeceuticals, etc., you cannot use Google+ to market those topics.7) Letting your page go dormant. If your Google+ account is dormant for more than 9 months, Google can snatch it right back from ya.How Marketers Can Get Banned From FacebookWe’ve all probably participated in our fair share of complaining about leaving Facebook. But could they force marketers to leave? Maybe, if they start doing any of these things that violate the Facebook Page Guidelines:1) Creating fake accounts. As Forrest Gump said, “That’s all I have to say about that.”2) Using bots or scrapers. Well, almost. Facebook says you can’t use them “without our prior permission.” Which basically means no using bots or scrapers … if you had permission, you’d know it.3) Posting copyrighted content. You’ve heard this one a bunch of times in this blog post, and if you do it a bunch of times on Facebook, they have the right to disable your account.4) Naming your page in goofy ways. Facebook has some pretty stringent naming requirements! Your page name cannot consist of solely generic terms, like “pizza,” must use proper grammar and capitalization, may not be in all caps, and may not include character symbols.5) Collecting user data incorrectly. What does that mean, exactly? It means you have to clearly state that it’s your business, not Facebook, collecting their information, and you will obtain their consent before using their data in any way.6) Including calls-to-action in your cover photo. This includes promotions or discounts, requests to ‘Like’ or share your photo, contact information for your business, or generic CTAs like “Tell a Friend.”7) Running contest or promotions outside of a Facebook app. If you want to run a contest or promotion on Facebook, you can only do it through one of their apps — either a Canvas Page or a Facebook App. You also can’t base participation on a requirement that a user take any action with your brand page, such as uploading a photo to your Timeline, or “Liking” a wall post. The only actions that are allowed as a condition of participation are “Liking” a page, connecting to your app, or checking in to a Place. You can’t use any Facebook mechanism, like the ‘Like’ button, in order to vote or register for the promo, either. Finally, you can’t notify winners through Facebook. So basically … you have to jump through a whole lotta hoops if you want to run a promotion or contest on Facebook.Have you unwittingly broken any of these social media rules? Have we missed any that you think marketers should know about?Image credit: emilyrides Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

5 Blogs With Comments You’ll Actually Want to Read

first_imgCopyblogger rocked the blogging world when they stopped facilitating comments on their blog and instead encouraged people to take the comments to social or to their own blogs. Thing is, this “we know what’s good for you” approach failed to take into account what their readers want – which is, to comment when they want, where they want.Lucky for us, there are still a multitude of great marketing blogs that welcome our comments. If you’re looking for a blog where the comments are as good as the articles, you’ve come to the right place.1) Grow – Mark SchaeferMany marketers (including me) love him for his forward thinking, his approachability, his no-nonsense advice, and his entertaining podcast with cohost and voiceover genius Tom Webster. Have you heard about the concept of “Content Shock”? You know that because of Mark’s post Content Shock: Why content marketing is not a sustainable strategy published in the beginning of 2014.That one blog post has 392 comments on it. Not painful, “great post” comments either. Mark’s ideas ignite debate, foster creativity and provide a fantastic exchange of ideas that are as valuable as the posts themselves. And even on an article with nearly four hundred comments, he replies to nearly every one of them. Having written for his blog before, I also know he asks contributing writers to respond as well.Check it out if: you want to be on the leading edge of marketing trends and get the inside scoop on how industry experts are reacting to and implementing them.2) Web Search SocialRalph and Carol Lynn Rivera have created something of a cult following for their podcast. The show notes are the place to continue the conversation you’ve been having with them in your head as you listen.One of the draws for the comments section is that Melanie Kissell nearly always writes a poem for each episode. Clever and fun, these really add to the program.Not ones to shy away from controversy, Ralph and Carol Lynn have taken on some common marketing practices and even specific tools on their show. This episode with the founder of Snip.ly lead to some interesting back and forth, including one comment which likens anyone wishing to protect their intellectual property to a whiny two-year old. The intelligent responses from hosts and guests and continuing dialogue never fail to get the creative juices flowing.Check it out if: you enjoy marketing smarts with a hefty dose of witty banter.3) Neil PatelNeil loves data. He’s a tester, an analyst, and he shares generously, including printscreens from his Google analytics and tons of numbers to back up his findings. He often presents his “how-tos” in a step-by-step format, which is especially helpful on his typically very long posts.What is great about some of the commenters here (and you do have to wade through quite a few “you are the best!” comments) is that they ask really personal questions that some of us might not feel comfortable asking. “How did you create that opt-in?” “How do you find time to write so much?” And Neil answers all questions graciously. Seriously, this guy is on top of it and is a real gentleman. You’ll also notice that commenters add in their own A/B results, link to other related articles, etc. So, you’re really getting double the content!Check it out: if you want to get the inside scoop on Neil’s considerable marketing success and a well-rounded look at what’s working for many companies.4) Seriously Social Iag.me with Ian Anderson GrayIan’s blog is the go-to blog for real tech and marketing geeks – and I mean that lovingly! He enjoys writing about tools and programs for marketers in a way that I quite appreciate. He’ll share his findings, pros, cons, setup instructions, etc. Seriously useful.The comments section often attracts the founders or representatives of the companies creating the tools he reviews, meaning commenters can get their own questions answered from Ian AND from the companies themselves. In Ian’s more technical posts, you will notice he addresses each commenter, helping to debug where necessary, even years after the post goes live.Ian said about his “7 Reasons NOT to use Hootsuite” article “It’s turned into a mini community (which I always strive to make my articles into). It’s been a place for people to ask questions, ask advice, share frustrations and give feedback.” Indeed it has – with nearly 500 comments and counting.Check it out if: you enjoy an objective look at tools and programs and want to engage with company representatives.5) Adrienne SmithAdrienne claims her business is about “Showing Bloggers How to Grow a Blog One Relationship at a Time.” She delivers.As with all good comment sections, Adrienne’s loyal readers add in great tools and success stories that add to the already useful content Adrienne supplies. But what really stands out is the way the commenters all seem to know and support each other, with Adrienne facilitating. This is not done in a way that makes new readers feel they are late to the party (I just started commenting today), rather it leaves one feeling as if they’ve stumbled upon a very safe place to ask questions and express concerns.Check it out if: you are looking for a supportive community as you grow your business.Blog commenting is a great way to get to know people, to get your questions answered, and to express your opinions. Which blogs do you follow for the comments? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Sep 16, 2015 1:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Blogginglast_img read more

Setting Your Publishing App Up For Success

first_imgSo you’ve just invested time, money, and a lot of faith in a new publishing app. If all goes as planned, it’ll increase content consumption, give you a new channel for advertisers, and build loyalty among your readers. But what about getting people to use it in the first place? Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come.With 1.2 million apps in the iTunes Store, getting eyeballs and driving adoption rates to your own app can feel just as hard as building the app itself. Sending out one launch email to your database won’t be enough. So how can you drive adoption rates as well as increase engagement levels of the users who’ve already downloaded your app?Increasing Publishing App AdoptionThe first step is to convince people that your app is worth downloading in the first place. To help your app stand out from the rest, start by…Making the benefits clear: In order for anyone to want to download any app, they need to understand what’s in it for them. Why shouldn’t someone just visit your site for content? Make the benefits, relevance, and value-add abundantly clear to your readers by clearly listing the extra functionality or features that your app provides. Will they be getting exclusive content on the app? Will articles be served to them based on their preferences? Can they enjoy content offline? Or without ads? All of these should be talking points you incorporate in the app store, on your website, and in email communication. Using smart content: Fish where the fish are. Use smart content to your advantage to highlight app download calls-to-action to anyone visiting your website via a mobile device. This catches people in the very behavior—reading on their mobile—that warrants the use of your new app. The same techniques can be used for email. Consider smart content that allows you to add a special PS to any email read on a smartphone or tablet. Getting social: Analyze your company’s performance on each social channel you use to determine where users are most engaged. From there, ramp up on organic content promoting your app, or consider running app-install ads to extend your reach. Focus targeting on users who are on mobile, already follow or like your account, and have interests relevant to your publication. For more on what to consider before launching an app-install campaign, check out this post. Using segmentation: If a certain set of on-site actions indicate download intent, use those to your advantage and create audience segments and workflow lists based on those criteria. Then set up CTAs “retargeting” those groups.Increasing Engagement with Publishing AppsHow many times have you downloaded an app, only to stick in a folder and forget about it several days later? Don’t let your app be forgotten. Instead…Keep content fresh: For readers to use an app on a regular basis, they need to feel like they’re getting new, updated content each time they log in. Put an editorial calendar in place, and give your development team deadlines to ensure regular, consistent content gets shared. Use analytics to understand users’ average time between repeat visits, and use that to inform your calendar.Don’t stop promoting: Don’t stop promotion efforts right after you launch your app. Continue app promotion on your website, social accounts, and in email, highlighting any updates, upgrades, or new content. Fatigued users can be re-invigorated by the promise of something new.  Use workflows: Use app data and user behavior to create re-engagement workflows with email. For example, you could send users who have download your app an automatic feedback survey after one week, or have a set of social ads displayed to readers who haven’t logged in after a certain amount of time.Answer FAQs: Give readers a tool to help them navigate your app more easily, and ensure they have something to reference to use the app to their fullest advantage. This can come in a variety of formats, from FAQs to in-app tutorials. You’ve worked hard to get users. Don’t let a poor in-app experience or unrealized features to be the reason people don’t come back.Pay attention to analytics: Regularly measure how readers are using your app. Which features do they engage with most? Which articles lead to reading other articles? What keeps users engaged the longest? Take these findings into account when you are planning to release new content or develop upgrades for your app.Increasing adoption rates and engagement with your app shouldn’t be an afterthought, but it also doesn’t need to be an overwhelming process. By using what you have in place and putting together a sound release strategy, you’ll increase your ability to attract and keep app users.  Originally published Oct 29, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Content Distributionlast_img read more

How to Be an Amazing Mentor: 12 Ways to Make a Positive Impact on Others

first_img Originally published Jan 21, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated September 05 2017 Topics: How to MentorAt its core, being a mentor is being a trusted advisor. Being a mentor involves making yourself available to support and advise someone when they need it, delivering that support in a way that makes sense to them, and always keeping that person’s best interests in mind.Take a minute to think about the best mentor you’ve ever had.This doesn’t have to be someone at work, although it certainly could be. But mentors come in all shapes and sizes: It can be your manager, a colleague, a parent, a friend, a coach, a college professor … anyone who’s been a particularly excellent advisor at some point in your life.Now, think of what made them stand out to you. Was it the example they set? That you felt like they really understood your communication style, your working style, or your goals? That they seemed to always point you to the right resources or give you the right advice when you needed it?At some point in your life (and, if you’re lucky, many times), you’re going to find yourself playing the role of a mentor to someone, somewhere. It can be both exciting, and a little confusing. What exactly does it mean to be someone’s mentor, and how can you really stand out in the role?Click here to download leadership lessons from HubSpot founder, Dharmesh Shah.Let’s touch on what a mentor is, including the three main types of mentors: peer mentors, career mentors, and life mentors. Then, we’ll go through 12 tips for being an amazing mentor.What Does It Mean to Be a Mentor?At its core, being a mentor is being a trusted advisor. It can mean a lot of different things, but it all boils down to making yourself available to support and advise someone when they need it, delivering that support in a way that makes sense to them, and always, always keeping that person’s best interests in mind.A mentor/mentee relationship can last for years, or it can last one coffee date. When you mentor someone long-term, you really get to know and understand their personality, learning style, and goals, which can set you up to offer richer, more relevant advice over time. But mentorship doesn’t have to be long-term. It can also be a one-off or short-term relationship, like when someone needs help working through a specific problem — such as a career transition or a problem with a coworker or manager. In an article for Harvard Business Review, Venture Capitalist Anthony T. Khan wrote about three types of mentors. Let’s explore each one below.Peer MentorsThis one is more of an apprenticeship than a mentorship. Whether someone is onboarding in a new job or simply at the early stages of their career, they may benefit from having a peer mentor working at their same company to help them settle in to their new job and climb the learning curve faster. A peer mentor focuses on helping with specific skills, working toward specific goals, and basic organization practices for how to get things done.Career MentorsWhen most people think of mentorship, they’re thinking about career mentorship. Career mentors are senior to their mentees at the same company or a former company. Their purpose is to serve as a career advisor and advocate, and to help reinforce how a mentee’s job contributions fit into their long-term career goals, and perhaps even how they fit into the bigger picture of the company’s goals.Some companies have career mentorship programs built right into their people development strategy. This seems to work best when it’s not a bureaucratic system, but instead more of a volunteer system where existing employees volunteer to mentor newer employees. “It should be something people know is embraced as part of the ethos of a firm,” writes Khan.Life MentorsA life mentor is usually someone outside of their mentee’s workplace. This person can serve as an objective sounding board when that person finds themselves faced with a difficult career challenge or is considering changing jobs. Khan writes that life mentors shouldn’t replace a peer or career mentor, but “they are there to impart career wisdom.”Chances are, you’ll be more than one of these types of mentors for multiple people, and you may have a few mentees at a time. There are a few pieces of advice that hold true regardless of the type of mentorship you find yourself in. Here are 12 tips on how to be an amazing mentor.12 Ways to Be an Amazing Mentor1. Approach each mentorship differently.While you can do your best to categorize a mentor/mentee relationship, every one is unique. When you first start out, it’s important to take the time to assess your own style and readiness, and think about what kind of commitment you can and want to make.Rebecca Corliss, who leads team development and culture for HubSpot’s marketing team, recommends asking yourself and reflecting on the questions on this list that are relevant to you:What kind of manager style do you naturally have/want?What expectations will you set in regards to your style and how best to work with you? How will you know when your mentee is successful?How will you communicate what success looks like to him/her?What do you hope your mentee’s development looks like over the course of your mentorship?How can you segment out his/her experience into phases to get to that point?How will you use one-on-one time?How will you explain your expectations for one-on-one meetings (if applicable) so you’re on the same page?2. Set expectations together in the very beginning.Once you’ve reflected on the questions from #1, both you and your mentee will find it helpful to sit down and go over expectations — especially if you’re just getting to know each other.For example, let’s say an alum from your alma mater sends you a cold email asking what it’s like to work at your company. You might be wondering if they asked you that because they want to work for your company, or whether they’re just curious about what a company in your industry is like. Understanding exactly where they’re coming from is going to help drive your discussion in the direction that’s helpful for both of you. If your company isn’t hiring or you aren’t comfortable helping them get a job, for instance, then you’ll want to set those expectations early.3. Take a genuine interest in your mentee as a person.A mentor/mentee relationship is a very personal one. You can give mediocre advice without really knowing a person, but to stand out as an amazing mentor, you’re really going to have to get to know your mentee on a personal level.You probably have some of the more career-oriented questions down: what their working style is, their dream job, goals for their current job, and so on and so forth. But what about the stuff that makes them … them? Getting to know your mentee on a deeper level will help you build a strong relationship, and it’ll also help you understand who they are as a person, their likes and dislikes, how they interact with others, and so on.So if your mentee tells you they had a great weekend, don’t just move on with the program. Ask them what they did, whom they did it with, or what their relationship is like with those people.One great way to get to know someone? Become an active listener. This is easier said than done: It means making a conscious effort to really, truly pay attention to what your mentee is saying, instead of thinking about what you’re going to say next. You might worry that you need to come up with something helpful right away, when in fact, the best thing you can do for your mentee is to listen closely to what they’re saying, ask open questions to dig deeper, and act as a sounding board.Which brings me to my next tip …4. Know when to wait before giving advice.When you’re mentoring someone, you might feel pressured to give them advice straight away. But not all feedback is helpful feedback, and giving unhelpful — or unwelcome — feedback can be detrimental to your relationship. An amazing mentor knows how to determine whether or not a situation lends itself to off-the-cuff feedback or really thoughtful feedback.Corliss calls this “hitting the pause button.””A good mentor knows when to hit ‘pause’ during a conversation,” she told me. “Once in a while, a conversation might catch us off guard. For example, maybe someone raises an HR issue or a serious problem with an employee. Maybe someone says something that makes you mad or upset. If you don’t have the right information, experience or emotional state to react to a scenario properly, hit ‘pause.’ That will give you a chance to get more information, talk to your resources, and come back with a clear and valuable response.”What might that look like in a real conversation? “Thanks for sharing this with me. I’m going to take some time and give this some serious thought before we continue. It’s important to me that I’m giving you the best possible solution. Why don’t we continue talking about it [tomorrow/next week/next time we meet]? I’ll book some time.”5. Improve your emotional intelligence.Being emotionally intelligent is a big part of being an amazing mentor. Any time you become a mentor for someone, you’ll find yourself getting to know their unique personality, their wants and needs, the experiences that have shaped them, and how they deal with different situations.The best mentors know how to unlock this information by asking the right questions, reading their mentee’s body language, being open-minded, and even acknowledging and controlling their own emotions. (Read this blog post for tips on becoming more emotionally intelligent.)6. Don’t assume anything about your mentee — ask.It’s easy to fall into stereotypes or not see a situation from another person’s perspective. But great mentors recognize that it’s their responsibility to break through common assumptions by asking questions and digging deeper. This is especially true if you’re mentoring someone who’s in the early stages of their career, or if the two of you are just getting to know each other and they aren’t sure how transparent to be.For example, let’s say you’re mentoring someone who’s having trouble getting through to their manager. Instead of launching into a story about a time you had communication issues with a manager of yours, spend time asking questions that draw out the important details of their problem. Ask your mentee detailed questions about their relationship with their manager. Don’t assume you understand their working style simply based off of the conversations you’ve had with them, as they probably work and communicate differently with their manager than they do with you.Only once you’ve gotten an honest background on a problem can you share helpful, relevant feedback — without making decisions for your mentee. That’s up to them.7. Be really forthcoming about mistakes you’ve made.Being open to sharing your own mistakes and failures is one of the best gifts a mentor can give. Not only is it helpful information for problem-solving purposes, but it also helps build trust, gives them permission to share their own mistakes, and strengthens the relationship overall.”Junior people don’t always feel comfortable owning up to a mistake or admitting that they’re struggling in a certain area,” says Emma Brudner, who manages HubSpot’s Sales Blog. “If you cop to your failures and struggles, you make it okay for them to chime in and help them share with you.”Leslie Ye, who writes for HubSpot’s Sales Blog, agrees. She suggests reflecting on the problems you faced and what has tripped you up at the same point in your career that your mentee is in. “Hearing how someone else approached a challenge is always helpful for someone going through it for the first time,” she says. “Even if you don’t solve problems the same way as your mentee, it’s always useful to hear multiple perspectives.”8. Celebrate their achievements.Because people often look for or call upon a mentor to help them with tough situations, many mentorship conversations revolve around the negative stuff. When you take the time to highlight and even celebrate your mentee’s successes and achievements, you’re not just balancing out the mood of those conversations — you’re also building your mentee’s confidence, reinforcing good behavior, and keeping them focused and motivated. Depending on the relationship, mentees might also be seeking approval from their mentors — and acknowledging their success is a way to satisfy that psychological need for recognition.How you go about celebrating their achievements is entirely up to you. For example, if you’re a peer mentor helping onboard a new employee, you may choose to publicly acknowledge them either by sharing their success with their team or even just with their manager. 9. Give more than you ask for.I believe in the principle of “what goes around, comes around.” I like to think about my mentors who’ve gone out of their way to meet me for coffee, give me feedback on job choices, point me to resources, and so on. The best mentors I’ve had have selflessly offered their time and wisdom to me — and I’m sure the best mentors you’ve had have done the same. Think about the impact they’ve had on your career, and offer the same to your mentees.”Give more than you ask for,” is how Ye puts it. “Most mentees inherently have less to offer because they’re typically younger and less experienced. It can be hard to ask for help if you feel like you’re a burden on someone else. Giving advice or help freely — and making it clear you’re happy to do so — is a huge help to easing those anxieties.”10. Seek out classes or projects related to skills your mentee wants to develop.Great mentors look for situations — and some even create situations — where their mentees can get involved to learn some of the skills they’ve been hoping to learn. It doesn’t matter how much or how little experience you have in your mentee’s current or desired job or industry — you can still give them helpful resources to succeed.It can be anything from connecting them with someone with experience in their dream job or industry, or sending them a website to a conference or class they might want to sign up for. Take note of the areas in which your mentee wants to grow, and always be looking for opportunities to point them in the right direction.If you work at the same company as your mentee and have some involvement in their experience, Corliss suggests introducing new projects to them over time as a way to build a strong foundation.”First, start with something that gives context,” she says. “This could be something that requires research and is genuinely valuable. Then, hand off something small that you normally do for your intern or mentee to own, like a weekly email, or a blog post. This will help your mentee learn how to develop ownership over something, including how to execute and reach a goal on his or her own. Then, build upon that foundation.”11. Solve for the long-term.Work with your mentee as if you’ll be their mentor forever. That mindset will make it easier for you to give them long-term guidance, which will help them make decisions that outlive their time with you.This is particularly important if you work at the same company as your mentee because it’ll help them make a larger impact at your company. “Giving [them] a lot of ownership may leave a gap when they leave, but why limit the impact your intern can have in order to solver for an easier transition out?” says Corliss. “It’s better to have loved and lost, than to have never have loved at all. “12. Lead by example.Last, but certainly not least, be a positive role model. Your mentee can learn a whole lot from you by simply observing how you behave. They’ll pick up information about your “ethics, values, and standards; style, beliefs, and attitudes; methods and procedures,” writes E. Wayne Hart for Forbes. “They are likely to follow your lead, adapt your approach to their own style, and build confidence through their affiliation with you. As a mentor, you need to be keenly aware of your own behavior.”At the end of the day, being a great mentor takes practice and patience. The more you work with a given mentee, the more you’ll learn a lot about them: their communication style, how they process feedback, how they go about pursuing their goals. At the same time, you’ll learn a lot about yourself: how effectively you can explain ideas in a way others can understand, how well you’re able to control your emotions, whether you’re able to provide a vision that motivates others, and so on.In the end, being a mentor will likely be as rewarding an experience for you as it will be for your mentees. What tips do you have for being a great mentor? Share them with us in the comments. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Mentorslast_img read more

How to Make Remote Work Actually Work

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published May 23, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Remote Working One of my favorite things about working remotely — which I do a few times a month — is the freedom to get comfortable. When I work from home, I’m usually find myself in one of three positions: sitting up at the table, laying down with my laptop, or buried in a pillow avalanche on my couch. (Sound familiar to anyone?)While most offices have a few full-time remote workers — and probably a few that operate like I do — the idea of more remote employees may be one companies need to get used to.Why is remote work becoming such a big deal? Well, from where I’m sitting (currently “sitting up at the table”), it’s simple: Because good candidates are asking for it, and technology’s making it an easier thing to demand — no matter what the position entails. For employees, this is great news. They can live where they want, spend less time and money commuting, and wear their bathrobe to meetings. But what do companies get out of it? According to research by online freelance marketplace Upwork, sourcing and onboarding in-office employees takes an average of 43 days, compared with three days for remote employees. Not to mention, being open to remote team members widens the talent pool. So to help you sort through the operations and expectations that employers need to consider to make remote work effective, let’s walk through some practices that make it easier for me to communicate and collaborate with my remote teammates.How to Make Remote Work WorkOn Setup & TechnologyI have very little in the way of tech savvy, but I do know that a good operational and technical foundation helps remote workforces stay productive. This is where two key teams come into play: Finance & Accounting and IT.It starts with a commitment — if you’re interested in making it — to investing in your remote team as actual employees that will grow with the company. Not contractors. Not freelancers. That investment means working with Finance & Accounting to understand the administrative costs of paying employees in different states or countries. Are there visa costs you’ll need to consider? Will employees need to travel to the office on a regular basis — and if so, is the company financing it? Do they have the technology they need at home to communicate with you effectively? Again, are you financing it if they don’t? These questions extend to IT and the infrastructure they’ll need to set up, too. They’ll want to build in security measures for employee devices, and will need to equip your office with the technology your in-office team needs to communicate with remote team members. This includes chat software, remote meeting software, telepresence devices, and potentially some high-tech conference rooms to make coordinating all of that seamless. One of my teammates who works remotely half the week and works with our global offices quite a bit actually takes pains to dial into meetings on video, specifically. She found it difficult at first but says it made her far more productive being visually present in meetings, and is grateful to have the infrastructure to support that.If you start with all of this built into your budget from the get-go, two things happen: 1) you’re not hit with surprise costs, and you can do a much better job with hiring planning; 2) you end up with streamlined operations for onboarding remote employees so their experience starting with your company is as good as it would be for anyone else.On CommunicationThe best IT setup in the world doesn’t help unless we’re all using it toward the right ends. At the risk of being trite, the most successful relationships between in-office employees and their remote team members comes down to good communication from both parties. And figuring out what good communication means is kind of a beast. So bear with me while I try to break it down to its most pertinent parts for our purposes here.Combat “face time” with over-communication.One of the challenges remote work presents is the lack of “face time.” Think about all those random one-off conversations you have in the hallway, or at the water cooler, that wouldn’t be possible if you weren’t in-office. To combat this, you really need to nail the whole “regular and effective communication” thing. Sam Mallikarjunan, who works from his home down south most of the time, found that a lot of the “random collisions” he used to have in the hallway don’t happen anymore. (Obviously.) When I asked him how he makes up for it, he said “I just over-communicate. I have to proactively find opportunities to work with other people. I make a point of reaching out to people more often to tell them what I’m working on if I think it might be useful to them, and I actively talk to other people about their projects, too. There’s a lot less ‘the ball is in their court’ mentality when I’m remote.”That proactive approach to communication is something that remote team members may start to pick up on just because they’re experiencing the need for it first-hand, so it’s equally important to have in-office employees reciprocate. Make it a practice in your company to systematize communication — to me, that means in-person decisions and conversations are always formally recapped over email, in your group chat client (provided it’s not in a room with only casual participation and monitoring), or for the big stuff, in a team meeting.Use your words.I have this theory that if street signs were properly punctuated we’d all be better writers. My favorite example is the “STOP CHILDREN” sign.STOP THEM FROM WHAT?!When communicating without the benefit of body language or tone, clarity with written and verbal communication is more important than ever. In an ideal world, everyone’s already really good at finding the right words to say what they mean. But that’s not reality, so we’re left with a few options here:1) Try to be better at it. If you’re writing an email, take a beat to reread what you’ve written. See if you’ve really communicated what you’re trying to say clearly and succinctly. Consider whether you’ve included enough context for everyone to understand what’s going on. If you’re having a phone or video conversation, take a moment before responding or posing a question. And if what you said makes no sense, own it and say, “Sorry I don’t know what I’m trying to say, let me start over.”2) Know that reading comprehension matters. If you’re on the receiving end of a communication that makes you go: Image Credit: Giphy… ask clarifying questions before responding with an equally confusing answer. I try to either copy and paste the exact copy from the email, quote it, and then ask my clarification question — or if it’s a verbal conversation, repeat back what they said before asking my clarifying questions. It’s important to avoid layering confusion on top of confusion.3) Avoid reading into tone. People’s tones suck sometimes. Especially over email. If a typically bubbly person didn’t include a barrage of emojis or explanation points, they’re probably just running late, or feeling stressed … or something else that has nothing to do with you.Put some alert metrics in place.We’ve used the term “pothole” metrics before — the numbers you report on regularly that, if they get out of whack, signify a deeper problem with a part of the business. I like to use that principle here as a way to be sure we’re all catching everything that’s going on if communication ever fails. I also like to expand that principle out to encompass the good stuff as well as the bad stuff.These could be numbers that indicate someone’s doing well or struggling — for example, setting up traffic waterfalls if a team member’s work is directly tied to hitting a traffic metric. But they can include non-numerical things, too — like hitting project milestones for people that work in roles that are more about discrete deliverables that have changing definitions of success.Frankly, this is a good exercise to go through for every team member — yourself included — whether in-office or remote. Really, it just means everyone knows what “good” looks like, and you’re all able to break down “good” into its component parts so you know if you’re making reasonable progress.On ManagementIf managers are interested in hiring remote team members, they’ll have some specific responsibilities to keep things chugging along nicely. Most of this is just about setting the right precedent for how to think about remote work for your team — I’ve broken it down into the stuff you need to do proactively, and what you need to squash.Do this:Over-communicate the work being done by remote team members, and the value of that work. Yes, they should do this on their own. We talked about that earlier. You have to be the champion of your own career, and self-promotion is part of life … and all that jazz. But sometimes people forget. Or they do say it, but it’d sure help if someone else reiterated it. This becomes particularly important when someone’s work output isn’t very visible. For example, if your job is to write one article a day, it’s pretty easy for people to see that you’re doing your job. You either wrote the article or you didn’t, and everyone can see it. If your role is to build operational efficiencies into backend systems that four people in the company touch … it’s really easy for that work to disappear.Squash this:To that end, don’t let resentment or pettiness build toward remote employees — particularly those that are part-time remote. This starts to manifest itself in little comments like: “Oh is this one of the days so-and-so is in? I can’t even remember.” Letting that kind of stuff slide is what makes it seem like in-office employees inherently provide more value than those that are in less often. Worse, it perpetuates the notion that face time is more valuable than work output, which I think we’re all on board with as being total bunk.Do this:Encourage other people on your team that are in-office and have roles that allow them to work remotely … to work remotely sometimes. That pettiness I was just talking about? It’s a lot less likely to happen if working from home once in a while doesn’t feel like a special privilege levied on a few special snowflakes.Squash this:This is where things can get tricky, too. Remote work only works when it works. Notice how I said you should only encourage remote work when people have roles that allow them to work remotely? We all know not every role makes that possible. But beyond that, not every person is always a good fit for remote work at every point in their career, either. I’ll volunteer myself as an example of someone who, when starting a new role, would struggle to not be around people while I get my footing.Or if someone is having performance issues, it may not be the right time to green light remote work. That’s another reason giving feedback early, often, and candidly is important. And that rationale extends to remote employees that start having performance issues while they’re already engaged in a remote work agreement with you.Finally, always remember to do this:We talked earlier about treating remote employees not like contractors or freelancers, but like actual full-time employees. That means they have career ambitions, and are probably interested in growth and promotion opportunities. Be sure to keep them in mind for new projects, promotions, and additional responsibility. If good people fall out of sight and out of mind, you might lose ’em.After you’ve got the infrastructure set up, to me, most of this really comes down to good hiring. Get the right person, for the right role. If you’ve got capable people you can trust in a role, you should be able to trust that not only are they doing good work, but that they’ll let you know if and when they need something different from you.The right person can make even roles that you don’t think will work in a remote scenario, work. (Unless that role is chef. Then you definitely need to be at work.)How do you make remote work work? Share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section below. Topics:last_img read more

7 Best Mother’s Day Ads

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! 4) FlyBabies | JetBlue (2016)After watching this ad from Boston-based agency MullenLowe, maybe you’ll think twice before judging the mother with the screaming baby on your next flight.For Mother’s Day 2016, this JetBlue stunt offered passengers a 25% discount on their next round-trip flight every time a baby cried on the plan. With four babies on the plane, their odds of getting a completely free flight were pretty good. This ad ultimately achieves the unachievable: getting airline passengers to clap and cheer each time a baby cries. 7) Tattoo | American Greetings (2017)In this heartwarming spot for American Greetings, MullenLowe took inspiration from a friend of creative director Allison Rude. After her father died, the friend discovered a card from her father, and got a meaningful handwritten line tattooed on her wrist. In the ad, a daughter gets a similar inked tribute to her late mother.  Sometime in early May each year, search volume for “When is Mother’s Day” begins to reach a panicked spike.Consider this article your official reminder: Mother’s Day is this Sunday (May 14th), and we have a selection of hilarious and heartwarming ads about moms to get you in the spirit.From a lighthearted garden gathering with the royal family to a moving tribute to mothers of sick children, each of these campaigns celebrate those authentic moments that bond us with our moms.A word of caution to those of you currently in the office: you might want to get some tissues ready. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.7 Great Examples of Mother’s Day AdvertisingMoms Explain What Their Kids Do in Advertising | MRY (2015)British Roses for the Queen | The Body Shop (2016)SickKids vs. MomStrong | Sick Kids (2017)FlyBabies | JetBlue (2016)Swear Like a Mother | Kraft (2017)Texts From Mom | Samsung (2015)Tattoo | American Greetings (2017) 5) Swear Like a Mother | Kraft (2017)74% of moms admit they’ve accidentally sworn in front of their kids before. The other 26%? “Full of sh*t”, suggests Melissa Mohr, author of Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing.To champion Kraft’s message of giving yourself a much-deserved break once in a while, CP+B Boulder asked Mohr to share some of her tips for those not-so-perfect parenting situations. Because being a mom is tough, and it’s healthy to remind yourself you don’t have to be perfect. 3) SickKids vs. MomStrong | Sick Kids (2017)A somber follow-up to the SickKids vs. Undeniable ad released in 2016, this Mother’s Day spot from SickKids Hospital underscores the agony and strength of mothers with chronically ill children.If the anguish depicted seems real, that’s because it is — Cossette Toronto, the agency behind the ad, cast real mothers in the short video, gently revealing personal, often unseen moments of pain and resilience. 6) Texts From Mom | Samsung (2015)Long ago, your mom taught you how to do things like eat, roll over on your belly, and use the bathroom. Some things are just not as intuitive as think, so don’t be too hard on your mom for her lack of texting expertise.This R/GA-produced Mother’s Day spot takes a hilarious look at some of the texts you might get from your mom, and reminds you to give her a call this Sunday.center_img 1) Moms Explain What Their Kids Do in Advertising | MRY (2015)If you work in the digital marketing or advertising space, you’ve probably struggled at some point to concisely explain what your job entails to your family. To celebrate Mother’s Day 2015, the folks at digital agency MRY posed a seemingly simple question to their moms: What do you think I do for a living?The answers — delivered via web cam by the moms themselves — range from “Online Advertising Through the Computer for Any Kind of Internet Kind of Thing” to “Annoying Pop-Up Creator” — and more than one childhood art project is unearthed for some unsolicited praise.  Originally published May 8, 2017 5:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Holiday Marketing 2) British Roses for the Queen | The Body Shop (2016)The Body Shop enlisted the help of London-based agency Mr. President to produce this candid, home video-style ad featuring a cast of (very convincing) royal family doppelgangers celebrating Mother’s Day in the royal garden.Allison Jackson, a BAFTA-award winning director best known for her lookalike photos of celebrities, was brought on to ensure the video looked authentic. last_img read more

Bahri to Sell Part of Its Stake in Petredec

first_imgThe National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia (Bahri) is looking to sell a part of its 30.3% stake in Bermuda-based liquefied petroleum gas transporting and trading firm Petredec Limited.As part of the deal, Haydock Holdings Limited, the other partner in Petredec, will also sell part of its 69.7% stake in the firm, bringing the total ownership of the new investor to 13%.Bahri informed that its financial impact from the transaction will be determined in the event of completion of sale.The company expects the sale to take place during the first quarter of 2018, and it will use the proceeds of the sale for general corporate purposes.Conclusion of the transaction is subject to several factors, including but not limited to legal review and final agreement on all terms of the transaction by all parties concerned, Bahri added.Image Courtesy: Petredec Limitedlast_img read more

SLNG Modifies Terminal to Receive Small LNG Ships

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Singapore LNG Corporation Singapore LNG Corporation (SLNG) has completed modifications to the Secondary Jetty at its Terminal on Jurong Island, and it is now able to receive and reload small liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships.The new Small-Scale LNG (SSLNG) Facility, completed on February 13, 2019, would be able to received ships of between 2,000 m3 and 10,000 m3 in capacity.The company said that SSLNG would help spur the development of the small-scale LNG market in various forms, including the delivery of LNG as bunker fuel to ships in the Port of Singapore.The SLNG Terminal’s Secondary Jetty was originally designed to accommodate LNG ships of 60,000 m3 to 265,000 m3 in size.In June 2017, SLNG performed a gas-up/cool-down and reload operation for the 6,500 m3 LNG bunker vessel, Cardissa. Following this event, and to better support small-scale LNG and LNG bunkering, SLNG took the initiative to commence modification works to the jetty so that even smaller LNG ships could reload at the terminal.The modifications included the installation of a new marine loading arm and gangway, and new facilities for securing small LNG ships at the jetty.“We believe that there is good potential for the small-scale LNG market to flourish in this part of the world, and the timely completion of the SSLNG Facility is an important step forward in SLNG’s efforts to support this growth,” Sandeep Mahawar, Interim CEO and Vice President (Commercial) of SLNG, said.“It also serves to promote the development of LNG bunkering in Singapore, which is another potential growth area given Singapore’s already well-established reputation as the top bunkering port in the world. As demand builds and there is a viable business case, SLNG may consider installing topsides at its Tertiary Jetty to accommodate more SSLNG reloads.”last_img read more

Dow Jones Industrial Average latest

first_img Posted: April 2, 2018 April 2, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 6:38 PMcenter_img KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsRising Trade tensions are rocking Wall Street.The Dow closed Monday down 459 points, or 1.9 percent.The NASDAQ sunk 2.7 percent and the S&P 500 declined 2.2 percent.The tech industry also saw some trouble with Amazon losing five percent after an attack from President Trump.And Tesla, Netflix and Cisco also all dropped by at least four percent.KUSI was joined by Brent Wilsey of Wilsey Asset Management with more. Dow Jones Industrial Average latestlast_img read more

Pentagon to Expand Benefits for Military Families

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Service members will be allowed to request deferring a transfer to a new duty location for a family-related reason such as remaining close to a medical facility treating a dependent or allowing a child to finish at the same high school, under a series of initiatives Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced last week to improve quality of life for military families.Such requests would be subject to the military’s force needs and would require the individual to extend a service commitment, reported DOD News.Other initiatives will extend maternity leave and expand access to child care and expensive reproductive technologies. The changes are intended to support military families, improve retention and strengthen the force of the future, Carter said.“As we introduce today’s reforms, our calculation is quite simple,” Carter told reporters. “We want our people to be able to balance two of the most solemn commitments they can ever make — a commitment to serve their country and a commitment to start and support a family,” he said.DOD will now provide 12 weeks of paid maternity leave for all service members, a doubling in time off for the Army but a cut for sailors and Marines who can receive 18 weeks of paid maternity leave under a change implemented last year.The department also will expand the hours of subsidized child care offered on installations to 14 hours a day across the force. Military families frequently use outside providers because the hours at military child care facilities cannot accommodate service members’ work schedules, according to the story.“By providing our troops with child care they can rely on from before reveille until after taps, we provide one more reason for them to stay on board,” Carter said. “We show them that supporting a family and serving our country are by no means incompatible goals.”last_img read more

Baul singer gang raped

first_imgA baul singer has allegedly been gang raped after being invited to a musical show in Ashulia, on the outskirts of capital.Being informed by locals, police rescued the woman, hailing from Narayanganj, from a house at Ashulia on Thursday.When the victim was taken to Ashulia police station she filed a case. Later police arrested two people – Abdur Razzak, 40 and Ataur Rahman, 42- from Aukpara area.Officer-in-charge of Ashulia police station Abdul Awal said a female singer with whom the victim got acquainted about a month ago invited her to the musical show on Wednesday night.When the victim reached the house as per the instruction of the female singer, eight-ten people confined her to a room and raped her overnight, the OC said.The victim was sent to One Stop Crisis Centre at Dhaka Medical College Hospital.last_img read more

US agency Hospital forced nurse to participate in abortion

first_img Share This! Tagsabortion conscience protections homepage featured nurse religious freedom Trump administration Vermont,You may also like Dinner church movement sets the table for food, faith and friendships August 29, 2019 Share This! News Pete Buttigieg: Religious left is ‘stirring’ August 29, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts By: Wilson Ring Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Wilson Ring Share This! By: Wilson Ring Judge denies nuclear protesters’ religious freedom defense Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email DIY Faith • News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont’s largest hospital forced a nurse to participate in an abortion procedure over her moral objections in violation of federal law, a government civil rights agency said Wednesday (Aug. 28).The University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington could lose some federal funding if the two parties cannot agree within 30 days on the hospital’s policies on employee participation in abortions, the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced.The nurse believed she would be participating in a procedure after a patient had suffered a miscarriage, office Director Roger Severino told reporters on a conference call. Instead, he said, she was told “‘Please don’t hate me’ by the doctor” when it became clear it was an abortion.The nurse asked to be relieved during what Severino described as an elective abortion and was told no. Faced with the prospect of losing her job, Severino said, “she relented and has been traumatized ever since.”The abortion took place in 2017, and the nurse filed a complaint with the civil rights office in May 2018. A subsequent investigation by the office “uncovered serious discrimination by UVMMC against nurses and staff who cannot, in good conscience, assist in elective abortion” in violation of federal laws known as Church amendments.In a statement, the hospital said it was disappointed by the action of the civil rights office.“The University of Vermont Medical Center has robust, formal protections that strike the appropriate and legal balance between supporting our employees’ religious, ethical and cultural beliefs, and making sure our patients are not denied access to safe and legal abortion,” the hospital said. “These protections cover initiation and cessation of life support, organ transplant, sterilization, and termination of pregnancy.”Susan Berke Fogel, a leader of the National Health Law Program, which advocates for reproductive health, said the Vermont case is missing details of what the nurse was being asked to do. The Health and Human Services Department, she said, has been expanding the definition of what it means to assist in abortion procedures.They are definitely highlighting and putting forward cases that will achieve that goal that anybody can refuse to participate in anything,” she said. “And surely, the long-term goal is to get hospitals and other systems to stop providing abortions and gender-affirming care.”The nurse, who declined to be named publicly, no longer works at the university hospital, said her lawyer, Francis Manion, a senior counsel at the American Center for Law and Justice, which works to “defend the rights of conscience of pro-life health care workers.”Federal laws protecting the rights of health workers who object to participating in abortions and some other procedures have been on the books for years. But religious conservatives who form a key part of President Trump’s base have long complained they were not enforced.Setting up the Health and Human Services “conscience office” last year was among a series of administration actions to address long-standing priorities of religious and social conservatives, who are key to Trump’s 2020 reelection campaign.A new rule banning federally funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions has led Planned Parenthood and other providers to leave the government program that provides for the funding. Another rule, not yet final, would revoke sex discrimination protections for transgender people in health care.The civil rights office is mainly known for handling privacy violations. Severino said the Vermont case was the third enforcement action since the launch of the new division last year.The other two involved pregnancy resource centers, one in California and one in Hawaii, that he said were discriminated against because they refused to make abortion referrals.Before Trump’s election, Severino said, the civil rights office averaged 1.25 conscience complaints a year. “Now we are in the hundreds of complaints,” he said.The Vermont Legislature this year passed a law, signed by Republican Gov. Phil Scott, ensuring a woman’s access to abortion. The Legislature also took the first step in a years-long process to amend the state constitution to achieve the same goal.___(Associated Press writer Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar in Washington contributed to this report.) Buttigieg walks fine line in courting religious left August 29, 2019 By: Wilson Ring Wilson Ring,Load Comments,India seeks to portray sense of calm in locked-down Kashmir Share This! Share This! 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Audit Prompts Changes To Help Houston Fire Departments Building Inspectors

first_imgThe Houston Controller last week released an audit of the Houston Fire Department’s Life Safety Bureau, which inspects buildings. City Controller Chris Brown told “Houston Matters” that, as an example, only 526 of Houston’s more than 5,000 apartment buildings were inspected in the last two years — well below the bureau’s goal of 470 apartment inspections per month.“It could have been that they have inspected more of these units. They don’t have records that are accurately reflecting that they had, in fact. There were records that were found on older databases, in logs and even in notepads in the various inspectors’ desks.”New Fire Chief Samuel Pena is already implementing changes, and says he wants to improve the bureau’s database.“We’re not able to share information between departments to refine our risk-based approach. If the Department of Health has cited a particular company because their range hood extinguishing system is clogged with grease, that’s important for us because that could present a fire hazard.”Pena says a consultant is helping develop a risk-based inspection program. It would prioritize buildings that need more frequent inspections, such as petroleum or chemical companies, schools and day cares and so on. X 00:00 /01:15 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Sharelast_img read more

All UFC PayPerView Events Moving to ESPN Exclusively in US Through 2025

first_imgThe UFC — in a major jump to digital away from traditional pay TV — inked an expanded pact with ESPN under which all of the mixed martial arts promoter’s pay-per-view events will be available exclusively on ESPN+ in the U.S. for the next seven years.Under the agreement, the ESPN+ subscription streaming service will be the only way for MMA fans in America to purchase and watch the UFC’s 12 annual PPV tentpole events through 2025. The deal kicks off with UFC 236 on April 13, featuring a lightweight title fight between Max Holloway and Dustin Poirier. UFC will continue to sell its PPV events to commercial establishments (like bars and restaurants) but individual fans will need to be ESPN+ paying customers to buy the pay-per-views going forward.UFC, majority owned by Endeavor, originally struck a $1.5 billion, five-year deal last year with the Disney-owned sports programmer, which nabbed the TV rights from Fox Sports. Under the expanded agreement, ESPN’s overall multiplatform rights have also been extended through 2025. ESPN is punching up its relationship with UFC less than three months after going live with the MMA outfit’s content at the start of 2019. Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 ESPN+ is available as an integrated part of the ESPN app on major mobile and connected-TV devices and platforms, including Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Apple iOS, Android, Roku, Google Chromecast, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Samsung Smart TVs.The UFC is just one pillar of the programming on ESPN+, which starting this year will also add MMA fights from the upstart Professional Fighters League. The over-the-top service additionally features hundreds of MLB and NHL games, Top Rank boxing, international soccer, college sports events, Grand Slam tennis, rugby and cricket, and the full library of ESPN’s “30 for 30” films.UFC produces more than 40 live events annually across the globe and has TV deals serving over 160 countries and territories,  with programming available to 1.1 billion television households worldwide. UFC Fight Pass digital subscription service, aimed at hardcore fans, provides content above and beyond what’s available via ESPN and ESPN+, including exclusive live events, original content, and thousands of fights available on-demand.Pictured above: Tyron Woodley (l.) and Kamaru Usman in their welterweight title fight at UFC 235 in Las Vegas.center_img “The extremely successful launch of the UFC on ESPN+ emphatically demonstrated the collective power and scale of ESPN and DTCI [Disney’s Direct-to-Consumer & International division], and we couldn’t be more excited to continue to drive passionate fans to these new pay-per-view experiences,” Jimmy Pitaro, ESPN president and co-chair of Disney Media Networks, said in announcing the new agreement.ESPN execs argue that ESPN+ is now an absolute must-have for any fan of the UFC and mixed martial arts. “The addition of this content gives ESPN+ subscribers access to the biggest events from UFC,” said Russell Wolff, executive VP and GM of ESPN+. “This is a place where UFC fans will be well served.”Previously, UFC PPV events have been available through U.S. cable, satellite and telco TV operators including Comcast and DirecTV, as well as via UFC.TV and Amazon Prime Video. Now ESPN+ is the only game in town for UFC’s pay-per-view.Lawrence Epstein, UFC chief operating officer, said an attractive piece of the PPV deal was that ESPN will be sharing “more robust” data about who’s buying pay-per-view events. “It’s really unlike anything we’ve had with legacy distributors like Comcast and DirecTV,” he said. “The amount of data we were getting on buys from the cable industry was pretty much zero.”UFC PPV events sold through ESPN+ will include all bouts on the main event fight cards and will be streamed in both English and Spanish. Preliminary bouts for all UFC PPV events will continue to air nationally on ESPN (English) and ESPN Deportes (Spanish) under the original 2018 agreement. In addition, early preliminary bouts will be available to all ESPN+ subscribers, as well as on UFC Fight Pass.With the newly expanded ESPN deal, UFC’s digital properties (UFC.TV, UFC.com and the UFC app) will continue to serve as a consumer entry point for PPV events but will redirect users to espnplus.com/ppv to purchase and watch the events. Fans must purchase the PPV events on the web, and then can stream it via the web or on the ESPN app. Pay-per-view access to UFC 236, to be held at Atlanta’s State Farm Arena, will go on sale April 8 on ESPN+. UFC president Dana White, asked in an interview why the exclusive PPV arrangement with ESPN+ was the right move, countered, “Why is it not the right move? Cord-cutting is real. It’s scary the amount of subs dropping every year. Why wouldn’t I want to be aligned with the biggest, baddest sports company in the world?”White added, “The timing couldn’t be better for us. Now it’s a one-stop shop at ESPN.” Endeavor president Mark Shapiro said the expanded deal “validates the power and fanbase of the sport,” noting UFC has garnered twice as many viewers on ESPN in 2019 versus the same time period last year on Fox Sports 1.Financial terms of the deal aren’t being disclosed. UFC generated well over $700 million for the 12 months ended March 31, 2018, per estimates from credit-rating agency Moody’s, with a big chunk of that coming from PPV buys.Clearly, both parties expect the exclusive ESPN+ PPV distribution will result in a bigger haul — even as ESPN cuts pricing on UFC pay-per-view events.Existing ESPN+ subscribers will be able to purchase UFC PPV events for $59.99 each. That’s compared with UFC’s previous pricing of $64.99 per PPV. In addition, ESPN is rolling out a new bundled option, offering new ESPN+ subscribers 12 months of the service with one UFC PPV event for $79.99 ($30 over the baseline annual plan). And ESPN says it may explore other pricing and packaging options in the months ahead.The base ESPN+ subscription package will remain $4.99 per month or $49.99 per year, which already offers 20 UFC on ESPN+ Fight Night events and hundreds of hours of other UFC programming, in addition to thousands of other sporting events and original shows.Disney was eager to pin down the exclusive ESPN+ PPV deal, which was officially clinched on Monday, because it sees the MMA content as a major driver for ESPN+ subscriptions: When the UFC debuted on the streaming service on Jan. 19, ESPN+ signed up 568,000 new subscribers in two days. Last month, Disney said ESPN+ had topped 2 million subscribers, less than a year after its April 2018 launch.last_img read more

Siliguri Intl Film Festival to kick off from November 19

first_imgDarjeeling: On the heels of Kolkata International Film Festival, the 19th Siliguri International Film Festival is all set to be flagged off on November 19th. The 6th Siliguri International Short and Documentary Film Festival will also form an important part of this film festival.The film festival will be inaugurated on 19th and will continue till November 26th. Around 17 films will be showcased from 9 countries including England, Switzerland, Sweden, Vietnam, Chili, Nepal and Bangladesh. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”The festival will commemorate 100 years of Bengali cinema and also mark the 100th birth anniversary of Master film maker Ingmar Bergman. There is a lot of excitement surrounding the festival,” stated Tourism Minister Gautam Deb. The festival will open with the Bengali film — Aschhe Abar Sabar. “Silence” by Bergman will also be screened. The film festival is organised by Siliguri Cine Society in association with the Department of Information and Cultural Affairs, Government of West Bengal, Federation Film Societies of India (ER) and Dinabandhu Mancha Advisory Committee. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe inaugural ceremony will be held at Dinabandhu Mancha, Siliguri at 6pm on November 19. The festival will be inaugurated by filmmaker Arindam Sil. Minister Deb will be present as the Chief Guest. “The Short and Documentary Film Festival will be a part of this festival. It will be flagged off on November 13 and will continue till November 16. Around 66 short films and documentaries will be screened. This is a competitive category for Indian short films and documentaries with cash awards,” stated Pradip Nag of the Siliguri Cine Society. The short films and documentaries will be screened at Ramkinkar Hall, Siliguri. Cash prize of Rs 5000 each will be given for best short film, best documentary, best Cinematographer and best Director. Jury mentioned award will be given for non-Indian films for best film, best cinematographer and best director. Tasmiah Afrin and Sadia Khalid from Bangladesh and Sankhajit Biswas from Kolkata will be present jury members.last_img read more