Handball Association Clarifies Pressing Issues

first_imgStarted at the campus of University of Liberia, the National Handball Association, NHA, has made a stride that many of his players, mostly students from the various schools are proud of. When Professor J. Mayson Saweler thought of the need to encourage the formation of the sport, he was aware of the challenges ahead.As a professor of physical education, Saweler realized that a healthy body is a happy person, and therefore he went ahead, with support from sports lovers to get the organization off the ground.“I proceeded nonetheless,” Saweler, who is also president of the Liberia National Handball Association, told the Daily Observer last Tuesday in Monrovia, “because I knew there was more that the sport can do for Liberian youths.”That was four years ago. Fast forward it to the year 2014 and after successful handling of the sport’s affairs, several schools in Monsterrado County, Grand Bassa, and Margibi County are part of it.“Liberia is not Monrovia,” Saweler said, “so we decided to take the sport to other counties.” And his administration is considering further expansion, after the successful defeat of the Ebola outbreak in the country. Regular leagues are organized and awareness about discipline has also been encouraged.In the organization’s first ever international assistance, Olympic Solidarity of the International Olympic Committee, through the Liberia National Olympic Committee, LNOC, provided sponsorship, along with a foreign expert that took participants through the sport’s fundamentals.“It was that support that moved our sport to another level,” Saweler said. He now pleads for more Liberian government’s support.He said, “We completed Ebola awareness for student athletes in Monrovia and we had hoped to extend it outside Montserrado County,” which could not continue due to lack of material support.Meanwhile, at the end of its successful leagues before the outbreak of the deadly Ebola disease, “We have six schools to award prizes at a convenient period,” he said.The schools, he said are Sarah Barclay in both male and female categories, (senior high); Melvin Sonnii (junior high) female division and Newport (male).“Slipway won both male and female versions in the elementary division,” he said.He said the six schools would receive a total amount of Ld30, 000.00, along with one set of jersey.One of the major setbacks for handball, he said, was the recent cancellation of both male and female teams to have participated in the Lome, Togo youth tournament.“Despite the disappointment,” Saweler said, “the grant of U$11,400.00 from the International Handball Federation is being spent for the development of handball, with the blessing of the International Handball Federation.”“It was good news for us,” he said. During the preparation for the abortive trip to Togo, the Ministry of Youth and Sports could not honor a budgeted U$16,000.00, since the ministry did not have money for the trip; a source told the Daily Observer.Among other activities, Saweler said his administration has purchased a vehicle for the organization to ease transportation difficulties. Needed support, he said was provided for three students, recently quarantined in West Point, and another is planned for three players in Dolo Town, in Margibi County who are also quarantined as a result of the fight of Ebola.Said head Coach Arthur N. Dormoh, “We are excited about the progress of handball so far because we can now travel to other counties and make deliveries of 100 handballs.”Coach Dormoh has been with handball from its formation. His colleague is (coach) Phillip Mansaray, who handles the male team.President Saweler meanwhile noted his appreciation to the LNOC for providing an office space for the association. “We have a contact point on By-Pass in Monrovia and we thank LNOC and its president Phillibert Browne for their support,” he said.He meanwhile expressed further appreciation to a foreign national who has been financially supportive to the development of handball in Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

I’m Not Going to Hide My Indian Heritage Any More: Vidya Vox

first_imgUnited States-based YouTube star Vidya Vox says that while growing up, she tried to shun her Indian heritage as she was often bullied in school. But she is now “100 per cent” proud of her roots and feels it is great to be an Indian in the United States right now.Vidya Iyer, better known by her stage name Vidya Vox, was born in Chennai, grew up in Virginia, and is based in Los Angeles.Asked how she feels about being an Indian in the United States under Donald Trump’s administration, Vidya told IANS in New Delhi: “It’s great. There are many people like Priyanka Chopra of South Asian descent in the media who are in the forefront right now. That’s really great. While growing up, I didn’t see examples like that.”“I was bullied when I was in middle school in DC, especially for being an Indian, because there weren’t many Indian kids in school. And because of that, I tended to hide my Indian culture, but that changed by the end of high school. Now, I am 100 per cent proud of it. I am not going to hide it any more,” she said.“Growing up, I had a bit of an identity crisis. I spoke in Tamil at home and ate dosa and idli. At school, I would listen to Beyonce (Knowles) and eat pizza and fries,” she added.The singer, who has learnt Carnatic music, felt like she was living in two separate worlds.“I always thought how could I marry these two worlds… even if it’s for a few minutes. That’s how we came up with the idea of mashups,” said Vidya.In 2015 she launched her YouTube channel with mashups of western pop hits and music from India. She has amassed over 350 million views and over three million subscribers.Being a YouTube star, cyber bullying must be common. How does she deal with it?“I don’t look at comments. I try really hard not to. It’s very difficult… people get bullied all the time. It’s important to remember not to listen to them. Your music is personal. Some people connect with it and some don’t. That’s okay,” said Vidya, popular for mashups like Closer-Kabira and Love me like you do-Hosanna.She has also come out with an album, Kuthu Fire, consisting of original songs. To promote it, she is currently in India for a multi-city tour.As part of ‘Vidya Vox Kuthu Fire Tour’, the singer, who is in her 20s, will be performing in New Delhi on Nov. 25.Fashion brand Forever 21 is the title sponsor of the tour. Asked about her personal style, she said: “A little bit of Indo-western. I love sort of mixing Indian jewelery with Western silhouettes.”Her mother and grandmother’s wardrobes also play major roles in her fashion sense.“They (mother and grandmother) say ‘I don’t want the sari. I am going to throw it away or donate it.’ I say, No! I will take it and recycle it and make clothes for myself,” she said.Is she thinking of starting her own fashion line soon?“Oh my God! That’s the dream. Hopefully soon,” said Vidya. — (IANS) Related ItemsMusicVidya VoxYouTubelast_img read more