Focus on technology

first_img Here, Press Association Sport’s Damian Spellman takes a look at the way technology has been used to help officials in recent years. VIDEO EVIDENCE Football Association chairman Greg Dyke is to push for trials of video replay technology as the debate over refereeing standards rages on in the wake of Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho’s outspoken comments at the weekend. The Football Association has used video evidence for more than 30 years to help enforce the rules of the game. As far back as October 1983, Birmingham’s Noel Blake was banned for head-butting Aston Villa’s Steve McMahon at the end of a tempestuous derby, an incident which had gone unseen by the referee, but was captured by Central TV cameras. The huge increase in television coverage since means the vast majority of incidents are recorded – and disciplinary chiefs can use the footage in a number of ways. While all games are reviewed generally by the FA, a panel comprising former referees Eddie Wolstenholme, Steve Dunn and Alan Wiley rules on incidents not seen at the time by match officials, while other exceptional events can be referred to a regulatory commission. That was the case when Manchester City defender Ben Thatcher was banned for eight games with a further 15 suspended after knocking Portsmouth midfielder Pedro Mendes unconscious with a forearm smash in August 2006. Thatcher had only received a yellow card from referee Dermot Gallagher. RADIO COMMUNICATION FOR OFFICIALS Officials used the system for the first time at the 2006 World Cup finals in Germany with Keith Hackett, head of the Professional Game Match Officials Board, confirming in May of the same year that the technology would be used in the Premier League during the 2006-07 campaign. The system allows the referee, his assistants and the fourth official to stay in touch by way of wireless microphones and ear-pieces to alert each other to potential issues and seek clarification when required. GOAL-LINE TECHNOLOGY The goal decision system was introduced to the Barclays Premier League for the 2013-14 season as a result of Frank Lampard’s goal that never was for England against Germany at the 2010 World Cup finals. The Hawk-Eye technology uses 14 cameras and sends a signal to the referee’s watch and ear-piece within a second indicating if the ball has crossed the line. It was in place for the Community Shield clash between Manchester United and Wigan on August 11, 2013 prior to its introduction for all Premier League games the following weekend. Hawk-Eye was used for the first time at Emirates Stadium on August 17 when referee Anthony Taylor was alerted to the fact that Aston Villa midfielder Fabian Delph’s shot had not crossed the line after beating Arsenal goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny and coming back off the post before rolling along the line. VANISHING SPRAY The Premier League announced on July 30, 2014 that it was to supply referees with the vanishing spray used successfully by match officials during that summer’s World Cup finals in Brazil. The spray, which allows a referee to mark both the point from which a free-kick is to be taken and the 10 yards into which defenders may not encroach, was used for the first time at the finals by Japanese referee Yuichi Nishimura during the hosts’ 3-1 victory over Croatia in Sao Paulo on June 12. Wembley was the first English stadium to witness its use during the Community Shield game between Arsenal and Manchester City on August 10 last year, and its use still raises a cheer from spectators more than six months on. VIDEO REPLAYS The Dutch Football Association (KNVB) is currently trialling video refereeing technology with 34 games having already taken place with an assistant monitoring, although as yet, not in communication with the match officials. A proposal to go live in next season’s KNVB Beker cup competition will be discussed by the International Football Association Board at its AGM in Belfast this weekend. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

March Madness 2019: Kentucky will long remember PJ Washington’s Sweet 16 feat

first_imgWhat had been a 39-26 lead early in the second half was entirely gone when Cougars guard Armoni Brooks hit a 3-pointer to tie it at 49-all and Corey Davis’ drive put Houston in front by a pair with 3:38 remaining. Kentucky scored on six of seven possessions from that point, including Herro’s big 3-pointer. Washington’s two free throws iced it.“I love our will to win,” Calipari said. “To be where we are still standing when we had Reid (Travis) out for what, three weeks, we had PJ out for … how we got through last weekend without him, I have no idea. I’ll say it again, if you take the best player off of any team in the NCAA Tournament, they’re not going to be the same. We just happened to survive.”The Wildcats lasted just long enough without Washington for him to hop into the picture and rescue them. It’s not the kind of thing Kentucky will forget. One more win, though, and his heroics will bear a reward that goes beyond public appreciation. His injured foot wasn’t feeling fine enough even to go through a gameday shootaround before the Wildcats faced 3-seed Houston in the Midwest Region semis in Kansas City. When it was time to warm up for the game in the hallways underneath Sprint Center, though, Washington was jogging with the other Wildcats. When the game tipped off, he was on the bench in uniform, waiting to be summoned.SN’s MARCH MADNESS HQLive NCAA bracket | Live scoreboard | Full TV schedule​When it was over, Washington was the star of a harrowing, 62-58, come-from-ahead-and-then-from-behind Wildcats victory. When it was over, Washington had left an indelible mark in a state where they remember the sort of sacrifice he made Friday evening.“We don’t win today if he doesn’t play,” UK coach John Calipari said to TBS’ Jamie Erdahl afterward. “I asked him before the game: ‘You going to be able to go?’ And he said: ‘I’m going.’”A week ago, not long after the pain in his foot first developed, the UK medical team had Washington’s left foot encased in a hard cast. He missed the team’s first-round NCAA game against Abilene Christian, and then a more challenging second-round win over Wofford.He told Erdahl each time she asked that his pain was significant. After he scored 16 points, shot 6 of 8 from the floor and delivered what could be considered a game-saving blocked shot with 36 seconds left and UK ahead by a point, he told her, “Right now, I can’t feel nothing.”Hear from John Calipari & PJ Washington after @KentuckyMBB gets the win over Houston to send them to the #Elite8. 🕺#MarchMadness | #Sweet16 pic.twitter.com/Gf0r8CiWfB— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 30, 2019A year ago, Washington had played on this same stage and performed brilliantly, in every department but one. He played all 40 minutes in that Sweet 16 game against Kansas State. He scored 18 points and grabbed 15 rebounds. But he went to the line for 20 free throws and only made eight. UK lost the game by just three points.This time, he was called upon to shoot two free throws with 3:51 left. He made them both to tie the score at 51. He got the ball in the post with 57 seconds left and UK down three. He scored on a jump-hook into his left shoulder, drawing a foul in the process. He missed that chance to tie the game from the line, but responded with that enormous block against Houston star Corey Davis Jr. It was a vicious rejection, but also gentle enough to remain inbounds for Wildcats freshman guard Tyler Herro to retrieve it.Exactly 11 seconds later, Herro bravely nailed a 3-pointer from the left wing and put UK ahead for good.PJ WASHINGTON BLOCKS. TYLER HERRO DROPS.Kentucky up two. pic.twitter.com/7yYtNJr4zQ— CBS Sports (@CBSSports) March 30, 2019MORE: Washington engineering Kentucky’s turnaroundAsked why he would play under these circumstances, Washington responded, “I had to. I didn’t want to let my teammates down. We had to win, so I just sucked it up.”Washington admitted he took some medicine for the pain before the game. “It kind of started hurting in the second half, but I have to tough through it,” he told reporters. “Through the end of the game, it was trying to cramp up. I’m definitely going back to get some treatment after this and try to get a good night’s sleep.”A Sporting News All-American primarily for his work in the regular season’s final six weeks, Washington was able to last 26 minutes against the Cougars. That wasn’t far off his per-game average of 29, but he’d gone 35 or more six times since Jan. 26 against Kansas.Make no mistake: The Wildcats needed him, not only to provide stability (point guard Ashton Hagans was limited to 26 minutes because of foul trouble) but also because the team was suffering in the second half from an overabundance of turnovers and dubious shots. There have been, through eight decades of NCAA Tournaments, 134 Kentucky Wildcats who have played in the Final Four, from superstars such as Jack “Goose” Givens in 1978 to walk-ons making ceremonial appearances such as Tod Lanter in 2015.PJ Washington is aching, literally, to be one of them.last_img read more

Langley is top seed in South Africa

first_img27 Feb 2018 Langley is top seed in South Africa Tags: South Africa Englishman David Langley fired a big warning shot when he won the 36-hole qualifier in the Sanlam South African Amateur Championship by four shots yesterday.In today’s matchplay, where he’s joined by Jack Gaunt (Drayton Park, Staffordshire), Andrew Wilson (Darlington, Durham) and Callum Mackay (West Hill, Surrey), he promptly won his first round match 3/2.The 23-year-old Berkshire golfer threw down the gauntlet in the qualifier when he opened with a five-under-par 67 in the brutal conditions at Durban Country Club on Sunday.Langley backed up his bid for the Proudfoot Trophy with a two-under 70 and sealed the top spot for the match play stage on an aggregate score of seven-under-par 137.He’s the first English player to capture the trophy since Laurie Canter in 2010, who went on to win the championship.Named after eight-time SA Amateur champion Douglas Proudfoot, the Proudfoot Trophy boasts an illustrious list of past winners, including Mark McNulty, Hugh Baiocchi, Dale Hayes, Denis Hutchinson – the last amateur to win the SA Open – and Major winners Ernie Els, Retief Goosen and Trevor Immelman. In recent years, European Tour winners Richard Sterne, Brandon Stone and Haydn Porteous also etched their names on the sought-after silverware.Langley was delighted to join the winners, but quickly added that this was just the curtain-raiser. “The real work starts now,” the Castle Royle golfer cautioned.“I am really pleased and very proud, but I’ve been in this position before. Last year I shot 14-under-par to win the 36-hole qualifier for the English Amateur at the Berkshire and got knocked out in the first round. So don’t pop the champagne just yet. If all goes well, I’ll celebrate on Friday.”Caption: David Langley with the Proudfoot Trophy (Image courtesy GolfRSA).Click here for more informationlast_img read more