The Best of #PostChat: Post Production Q&A Archive

first_imgEver missed a #PostChat Twitter conversation and wished you could go back and read it in full?#PostChat meetup at NAB 2014 (from Avid)The weekly #postchat event hosted by Gordon Burkell (@AOTGNetwork), Tej Babra (@tejbabra) and Jesse Averna (@Dr0id), is a brilliant opportunity to ask post production professionals from around the world, any question you like on that week’s topic (there’s a new topic each week). PostChat is a twitter based chat for post-production professionals that occurs every Wednesday at 6 PM PST (9PM EST).Previous topics have included editing feature films (led by the editor of Sharknado 2),  cutting award winning documentaries, handling audio, motion graphics, women in post, visual effects and many, many more. #PostChat is also a fantastic way for the gathered post production community to share it’s collective wisdom, experience and advice with the rest of the world.But if you missed the live question and answer session, fear not! Thanks to editor Liam Johnson, (@editorliam) you can quickly catch up on that week’s #postchat and explore an extensive Storify archive of previous weeks. Check out Liam’s complete archive here.One of the most popular #postchat collections in Liam’s archive was the week spent discussing the best practices for starting a project which you can check out here. If you want to get involved in #postchat session then the best way is to make use of this Twitter ‘chat room’.last_img read more

7 Clever Email Campaigns That Get Customers Buying Again

first_img Ecommerce Sales If you have a great product, customers will probably want to buy from you again. But that doesn’t mean they’ll always remember to. People are busy; no matter how much they love you, sometimes it’s just hard to keep in touch, you know? Which is why email remarketing campaigns are great ideas for those who have purchased (or almost purchased) from you in the past!What’s an email remarketing campaign, you ask? Pretty much what it sounds like … you send an email marketing campaign to a lead or customer in your database that encourages them to purchase from you again.Click here to download our free beginner’s guide to email marketing.And ecommerce businesses that don’t leverage remarketing campaigns are missing a huge revenue opportunity — according to Practical eCommerce, only 5% of new customers that make a purchase with a company return to the site, and only 3% make a second purchase. Them’s not good odds.But they can get better when you leverage email remarketing campaigns. Practical eCommerce also found that customers who have recently made a purchase on your site are more than twice as likely to return to your site and complete a purchase when they receive remarketing emails. Now those are numbers I can get behind.So to get you started with email remarketing, we’ve gathered some creative ideas for you to consider for your own email remarketing campaigns, all from real brands that are excelling with their own programs. Take a look, and get some inspiration so you can generate more revenue out of a contact database that already loves you!1) Abandoned Shopping CartWe’ll start with the most common email campaign used to recall customers to your website — the abandoned shopping cart email. Take a look at how HubSpot customer Shar Music gets in touch with customers who have almost completed a purchase on their website, but abandon their shopping cart at the last minute.This is just one in a series of three emails that Shar Music sends to an abandoned shopping cart customer to encourage them to return to the site and complete their purchase. A key takeaway of this abandoned shopping cart email is how easy they’ve made it for the recipient to understand the purpose of the email, and to act on it. The design isn’t fancy; it doesn’t need to be. It simply asks, “Can we help you with anything?” in bold letters that stand out from the rest of the email, and provides a large call-to-action button at the end that makes it easy for the recipient to return to their shopping cart and complete their purchase.If abandoned shopping cart emails aren’t part of your email remarketing strategy yet, they’re some seriously low-hanging fruit; just make sure to follow up with an abandoned shopping cart customer quickly. An MIT study via SeeWhy showed that 90% of ecommerce leads go cold within one hour, but when remarketed to, spend 55% more!2) Wishlist SaleAlways a fantastic email remarketer (their campaigns will appear in this post a few times), ModCloth has leveraged its “Wishlist” feature to remarket to their customers. You know the wishlist — many ecommerce sites let you bookmark items that you really like, but perhaps aren’t ready to purchase. It’s common for customers to do this when they’re researching options from multiple businesses, or when they see something they would like to get, but certainly don’t need. Until they get this remarketing email, of course:When customers are comparison shopping or unwilling to complete the purchase of something they like, price is often a factor. This remarketing campaign is genius because it addresses that purchase blocker by alerting me that something I wish I could have is now on sale. If I wasn’t willing to buy it for its original price, maybe I’d be interested to “Grab It Now” for the sale price. Brilliant!3) Last Chance to PurchaseJust like ModCloth lets you know when something on your wishlist is on sale, they have a remarketing campaign that alerts you when something on your wishlist is almost out of stock. Sometimes a sale can be enough to incite a customer to purchase; but maybe the urgency of an item selling out is enough for those items that are so popular you don’t even need to put them on sale!Emails like these are not only great because they encourage a purchase, but they also do so in a way that actually comes off as customer service. You’re doing your customers a favor in this email — getting in touch with them to let them know something they like won’t be available soon. Personal service, meet 2012 ecommerce — we think you two might have a lot in common.4) Repetitive BehaviorTarget people’s past buying behaviors to get in touch with them right at (or ideally, a little bit before) the moment they’ll need to make a purchase. This is a great email remarketing technique for businesses that deal with monthly, quarterly, or yearly purchases — like an online contact lens retailer, for example. Since they know when you last bought contacts, in what amount, and how long that amount will last, they can perfectly time an email remarketing campaign to hit at your time of need.But there are a few other creative applications for this type of remarketing campaign, too. Just take a look at how 1-800-Flowers targets holidays for which their products are a great fit in their 2012 Mother’s Day campaign. Even though I didn’t buy flowers from them at Mother’s Day last year (calm down, I used another vendor — I’m not an animal!), I’ve purchased with them for other holidays. So it’s smart of them to recognize Mother’s Day as an opportunity for me to buy flowers from them instead of another competitor, since they know I’m likely to buy flowers from them for other holidays.You can also do a mash-up of the two concepts we just discussed, like Pottery Barn did below. They took a more subjective look at customer buying behavior, and matched it up with the time of year to come up with this remarketing campaign. Since I purchased items from their outdoor collection last spring, I might be interested in doing so again this year. Share your creative ideas for email remarketing campaigns in the comments!Image credit: gordontarpley (Tip: If you do have an algorithm running, you can use your purchase confirmation email — an email that typically has a very high open rate — as an opportunity to include these recommendations.)6) All Your Friends Love It!We’ve already talked about the importance of social proof and user-generated content in your marketing; why not include it in your next email remarketing campaign? Send an email like ModCloth’s below (I told you they’d make multiple appearances today) that shows what others are saying about products you might like based on your past purchase history. These testimonials come from the product review section of their website, but you could also pull from customers’ tweets and Facebook status updates that praise your product — I’ve received an email from these folks that does just that in the past, too!7) Back in StockFinally, consider sending an email alert for the products your customers wanted, but couldn’t quite get their hands on, like you see below. There are two ways to approach this particular email remarketing campaign, both of which hinge on the fact that you keep out-of-stock products on your website.The first is to add a module to your website for products that are out of stock that lets customers put in their email address, and ask to be alerted when a product’s inventory is restocked. The other method, which can be combined with the previous one, is to alert customers who had an item on their wishlist but didn’t complete the purchase before an item sold out. In this instance, you know a customer loved an item, but just didn’t get to checkout in time; a remarketing campaign that let them know their much-coveted item is available would be another great way to deliver some seriously personal service! 5) Add-On and Related Item SuggestionsYou know when you go to Amazon.com and they have a whole list of items they think you might like based on the product page you’re viewing? Some of them are add-on items (products that would make the one you’re looking at function better); and some are related items (products that other shoppers who purchased an item tend to like).You might not have an algorithm running like Amazon does to tell you these things (or maybe you do!) but you can still take your product knowledge and apply it to an email remarketing campaign that recommends buyers purchase add-on and related items. Take a look at how Buy.com did it below.center_img Topics: Originally published Apr 27, 2012 1:27:00 PM, updated November 30 2018 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

40 Ways to Get Banned From the Top 5 Social Networks

first_img Social Media Fails Originally published Sep 17, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: It may feel like a fustercluck, but there are actually some rules and regulations that go along with participating in social media. Not the kind that ban people from uploading pictures of their meals (PB&J no crust today guys! #omgsohungry), but the ones that help alleviate things like spamming, bad content, and a poor community experience. You know, the things that help make social media a nice place to be.It’s not a perfect system the social networks have worked out, but it’s important for marketers to know — because believe it or not, lots of marketers are breaking these rules and don’t even know it. And it breaks our hearts to see marketers giving an honest go of social media get banned from the networks … and then not even know why the heck it happened.This post will review the policies the most popular social networks have set up — some more stringent than others — that we think you should be aware of. And we tried to put them in plain English, too, devoid of confusing and boring legal babble. If you’re accidentally breaking any of these rules, at least now you can put the kibosh on your illicit activities before it’s too late!How Marketers Can Get Banned From PinterestIf you’re curious how the newest social network on the block works, we encourage you to read its Terms & Privacy page in full. But for a quick reality check, here are the guidelines marketers should remember when pinning to ensure they stay in Pinterest’s good graces:1) Grabbing another company’s account name. When you open an account on Pinterest, you’re indicating that you are authorized to act on behalf of that company. So if you’re not an employee of that company, you’re not authorized. And if you get caught, you’re not allowed on Pinterest anymore, either.2) Pinning copyrighted content. Any content you post cannot infringe on the rights of the content creator. Make sure it’s either content you’ve created yourself, or content you have a license to share. That means if you’re posting an image from your blog post, that better be copyright-free!3) Automating your Pinterest content. Marketers can’t use an automated service to post content to their pinboards, repin or like other pinners’ content, or create links. All the rewards you reap from Pinterest, in other words, have to come from your own hard work! Note: If you pin a ton of content from one URL all in one sitting — let’s say you just published a blog post with a ton of great images, for example — you may be prompted by Pinterest to verify that you’re not a bot. Just fill it in and keep on keepin’ on.4) Scraping content from Pinterest. On a similar note, you can’t use automation to scrape content from Pinterest. Whether you wanted to use it in blog posts, on your Facebook page, to get a list of links — whatever — you can’t do it. Again, any information or content gathered has to be done manually.5) Scraping for contacts. Any contacts you get from Pinterest have to be opt-ins; as in, they have to come to your site and fill out a form saying they want to hear more from you. Scraping Pinterest for pinners’ personal information so you can market to them later is strictly prohibited.6) Spamming posts. Just like you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of blogs, you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of pins.7) Putting links in the wrong place. Pinterest wants you to include links in your pins so pinners can follow the links to get more information on a pin. But they only want it in the right place. When you pin an image, click ‘Edit,’ where you’ll find a field labeled ‘Link.’ Put your link anywhere else and you may get banned.8) Don’t get banned. If you’ve been banned once, you’re banned for life. Or as Pinterest puts it, “the Service is not available to any users previously removed from the service by Pinterest.” So, tread lightly.How Marketers Can Get Banned From LinkedInLinkedIn’s rules aren’t as stringent as the ones we’ve seen on other social networks — perhaps the B2B playground hasn’t gotten quite so out of hand. You can read LinkedIn’s User Agreement in full, or just browse these highlights that jump out for marketers:1) Connecting with people you don’t know. Seriously! You have to actually know the people you connect with on LinkedIn, or they can boot ya right off!2) Posting copyrighted content to forums. Whether it’s your LinkedIn Group, LinkedIn Company Page, or on LinkedIn Answers, you can’t publish information that violates others’ intellectual property rights. This one won’t get you banned, but LinkedIn can remove the content and close your group or page. Additionally, LinkedIn will terminate the accounts of users who have been “deemed to be repeat infringers under the United States Copyright Act.” You know who you are.3) Using LinkedIn messages as an ESP. LinkedIn messages are not to be used for mass emailing. This constitutes a misuse of service, and can get you kicked off the network.4) Putting links and email addresses where they don’t belong. You get to fill out your profile however you want, as long as it’s accurate. So if you put, say, a link to your blog in, oh I don’t know, the ‘Name’ field … you’re gonna get shut down pretty fast.5) Selling your LinkedIn presence. Built up a pretty big LinkedIn Group? It might be an asset, but you can’t sell it or monetize it in any way if you want to stay on the social network.6) Using bots to get connections, followers, or members. Just like Pinterest and some other social networks we’re about to cover in this blog post, LinkedIn wants you to grow your reach organically.7) Impersonating another company. Another familiar refrain, brands can’t create a fake profile for a competitor to mess around on. You’ll look stupider doing that than they will, anyway.How Marketers Can Get Banned From TwitterThe full list of Twitter “rules” can be found here: The Twitter Rules. Aptly named, eh? Here are the ones that are most likely to apply to marketers so you don’t get banned by that sweet little tweety bird:1) Impersonating others. If you’re impersonating others in an attempt to mislead other Twitter users, Twitter will not be happy. That means no pretending to be a competitor — that’s a low blow move, anyway.2) Snagging trademarked usernames. Another sketchy move is trying to grab your competitor’s username. If they’ve trademarked the name, Twitter will reclaim it from you on their behalf. Twitter will also suspend you if you’re using trademarked logos on your profile.3) Squatting on handles. Ow, that sounds uncomfortable. This means you can’t grab a Twitter username and not use it. Well, you can, but Twitter will just grab it right back if it remains inactive after 6 months. On a related note, you can’t grab a username for the purposes of selling it.4) Buying or selling Twitter usernames. There can be no transactions made around Twitter usernames at all. The penalty is possible permanent suspension from Twitter — for buyers and sellers.5) Giving yourself an unearned Twitter badge. Twitter has little badges for Promoted Products and Verified Accounts. If you use one of these badges anywhere on your profile — including your profile picture or background image — your profile will be suspended.6) Posting the same thing over and over. If you’re trying to get a tweet visibility, you can’t do it by tweeting it like a maniac, particularly if it’s duplicate content tweeted at specific users. Same goes for links — Twitter will penalize you if they see you tweeting the same link over, and over, and over … and over.7) Following people like a bot would. That means you shouldn’t use a bot to manage your following and unfollowing, nor should you act like a bot when manually following and unfollowing people. Aggressive follow and unfollow behavior — particularly seeing a large amount of people followed and/or unfollowed in a short period of time — will signal to Twitter that something’s amiss.8) Getting followers in sketchy ways. Specifically, those “get followers fast!” schemes. It may get you permanently banned from Twitter.9) Hijacking a hashtag or Trending Topic. If there’s a #hashtag or trending topic blowing up Twitter and you want in on the action, you can’t try to hijack it with unrelated content about your brand. If you do, you could feel the wrath of the mighty blue bird mighty soon.10) Posting links with no context. If your updates are just a slew of links with no personal content to give them context, you’ll not only annoy your followers, but Twitter will also want you off their network.11) Getting ratted out. Sometimes the Twitter community self-polices. If a large number of people are blocking you, or your account has received a lot of SPAM complaints, Twitter will boot you. So play nice out there.How Marketers Can Get Banned From Google+If you’re using Google+, there are a couple surprises in here that you might not have considered. You can read their Google+ Policies & Principles in full here, or catch the biggies below:1) Creating fake pages. Yes, it’s prohibited here, too. Big shock. Moving on.2) Running contests. Ooooh, that’s a new one! You cannot run contests, sweepstakes, offers, or coupons directly on your Google+ page, but you can display a link to those promotions that leads people offsite.3) Aggressive Circling. That’s a … weird phrase. But much like you can’t aggressively follow and unfollow people on Twitter without getting flagged, you can’t Circle a ton of people on Google+ without punishment.4) Altering or adding +1 buttons where they don’t belong. Similar to the Twitter badge rule, you can’t, say, superimpose the Google +1 button on an ad. It’s a misleading way to garner clicks.5) Keyword stuffing. Yes, it can happen here, too! Because Google+ is so closely tied with organic search, the penalties are just as stiff. If you’re trying to rank for a keyword, stuffing it into every Google+ update is not the way to do it.6) Marketing regulated products. If you’re marketing in a regulated industry, such as alcohol, tobacco, medical devices, fireworks, pharmeceuticals, etc., you cannot use Google+ to market those topics.7) Letting your page go dormant. If your Google+ account is dormant for more than 9 months, Google can snatch it right back from ya.How Marketers Can Get Banned From FacebookWe’ve all probably participated in our fair share of complaining about leaving Facebook. But could they force marketers to leave? Maybe, if they start doing any of these things that violate the Facebook Page Guidelines:1) Creating fake accounts. As Forrest Gump said, “That’s all I have to say about that.”2) Using bots or scrapers. Well, almost. Facebook says you can’t use them “without our prior permission.” Which basically means no using bots or scrapers … if you had permission, you’d know it.3) Posting copyrighted content. You’ve heard this one a bunch of times in this blog post, and if you do it a bunch of times on Facebook, they have the right to disable your account.4) Naming your page in goofy ways. Facebook has some pretty stringent naming requirements! Your page name cannot consist of solely generic terms, like “pizza,” must use proper grammar and capitalization, may not be in all caps, and may not include character symbols.5) Collecting user data incorrectly. What does that mean, exactly? It means you have to clearly state that it’s your business, not Facebook, collecting their information, and you will obtain their consent before using their data in any way.6) Including calls-to-action in your cover photo. This includes promotions or discounts, requests to ‘Like’ or share your photo, contact information for your business, or generic CTAs like “Tell a Friend.”7) Running contest or promotions outside of a Facebook app. If you want to run a contest or promotion on Facebook, you can only do it through one of their apps — either a Canvas Page or a Facebook App. You also can’t base participation on a requirement that a user take any action with your brand page, such as uploading a photo to your Timeline, or “Liking” a wall post. The only actions that are allowed as a condition of participation are “Liking” a page, connecting to your app, or checking in to a Place. You can’t use any Facebook mechanism, like the ‘Like’ button, in order to vote or register for the promo, either. Finally, you can’t notify winners through Facebook. So basically … you have to jump through a whole lotta hoops if you want to run a promotion or contest on Facebook.Have you unwittingly broken any of these social media rules? Have we missed any that you think marketers should know about?Image credit: emilyrides Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Which Format Is Right for Your Next Blog Post?

first_imgChoices are hard.And when it comes to choosing the right format for your next blog post, there’s quite the smorgasbord to choose from. Perhaps how-to posts are your forte. Or maybe you just can’t resist the list. But just because you have a signature format, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily right for the topic you’re blogging about.Aah … decisions, decisions. It’s okay though! We’re here to help you through it. So in this post, I’m going to break down some of the most popular blog post types and formats to help you determine which one is right for the blog idea you’ve got milling around in that head of yours.That said, keep in mind that some posts may even straddle two or more formats. I’ve written thought leadership posts that could also probably be classified as list posts. And if I’d added a SlideShare to them? They would’ve straddled three! The point is to recognize that there isn’t just one type of blog post you can create — and some formats are much more suitable for certain ideas than others. Another thing to consider is that a lot of times, it will all boil down to the angle you take on a topic. For example, if I wanted to write a post about social media, there is probably a different angle I could take that would work for each of the following formats. It will all depend on the angle I decide to take.Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post Templates13 Popular Blog Post Types & Formats to Choose From1) The How-To PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that tell your readers how to do something. This is one of the most common blog post formats for business bloggers. It makes perfect sense, considering how-to posts are inherently educational and great for generating traffic from organic search. Use how-to posts when your topic has to do with educating your audience about how to do something they might not know how to do.Oftentimes, how-to posts can also be strengthened by supporting visual components for concepts that lend themselves to visual explanations, like an instructional video (see third example below), or a visual aid (see second example below). For more information about how to write an awesome how-to post, check out the first example below (how meta, right?).Download a Free How-To Blog Post Template HereExamples:How to Write Stellar How-To Posts for Your Business BlogHow to Map Lead Nurturing Content to Each Stage in the Sales CycleHow to Create a Facebook Business Page in 5 Simple Steps [With Video!]2) The ListicleIn a Nutshell: Posts featuring content presented in a list format. Another very popular blog post format, the list post (commonly referred to as a “listicle”), is characterized by content organized in a list. List posts are easily recognizable by their titles, since they usually include a number in headline, and they’re great formats for beginner bloggers since they’re very formulaic. Unfortunately, it’s for this reason that listicles have gotten a bad rap, and are often perceived as low quality pieces of content … probably because there are indeed a lot of crappy list posts out there.But when done right, lists posts are great for posts that seek to aggregate tips, tactics, or ideas under a certain topic, and they can result in high-quality content. Plus, people love ’em! To learn about how to create a high-quality list post, check out this post. (Bonus: It also happens to be a great example of a list post in and of itself, in addition to the few below.)Download a Free Listicle Blog Post Template HereExamples:30 Terrible Pieces of Social Media Advice You Should Ignore12 Automated Workflows You’ll Kick Yourself for Not Using12 Things You Should Be Using Your Blog For (Besides Blogging)3) The Curated Post In a Nutshell: Posts that highlight and curate other content around a certain theme.Another post that has historically (yet undeservingly) gotten a bad rap is the curated post. Although it’s sometimes perceived as lazy and unoriginal, curated content can actually be extremely helpful to readers, since the research component of them can be very time consuming, and the end result is a compilation of helpful resources all in one place.The curated post is ideal for aggregating content such as industry examples, statistics, quotations, and videos — among other things. It’s also great for building relationships with the other bloggers and businesses you highlight within your curated content.Examples:15 Phenomenal TED Talks You Need to Watch Today10 Brands That Jumped on Instagram Video (And Rocked It)15 Examples of Brilliant Homepage Design4) The Thought Leadership Post In a Nutshell: Posts that make you think.One of the more difficult types of posts to write, thought leadership-style posts usually take the form of pontification about things like where the industry is headed or industry trends that seem to be emerging and what they mean.For this reason, they’re not really the type of post you can just decide to write at the drop of a hat, like, “I’m going to write a thought leadership post today!” Rather, they’re usually the result of thoughtful examination of things you’ve noticed or have been thinking about over time, and they tend to be speculative and sometimes controversial in nature. They also tend to spark some great discussions!Examples:What the Future Holds for Business BloggingHow Social Media Capitalism Will Affect Your Future Marketing StrategyWhat the Death of Google Reader REALLY Means5) The Fun PostIn a Nutshell: Fun posts that are meant to entertain you.Because who doesn’t love to laugh, smile, or be amazed? Content whose main purpose is to entertain does have a place in your content mix, and it can be very refreshing to your audience — as long as it’s in moderation.These types of posts are great for publishing during holidays, the end of the day, the end of the week, and other times when your audience is burnt out, winding down, or could use a break from some of the more, um, intellectual content on the web. Just make sure you stay true to the focus of your blog overall by ensuring the concept of your fun post has a relevant tie-in. For more on the benefits of entertaining content, here’s why you should publish content for entertainment value alone every once in a while.Examples:Random Thoughts From Marketers Like You13 Hilarious Examples of Truly Awful Stock Photography16 Marketing Pick-Up Lines to Snag Your Next Hot Date6) The ‘What’ PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that explain a concept.The ‘what’ post is perfect for introductory-style content geared toward a beginner audience. In general, the ‘what’ post serves to introduce and explain a concept, whether it be an industry trend, tactic, or tool; and it typically highlights what it is and why you should care. Linking to or including a call-to-action for more in-depth, intermediate content (like an ebook or another blog post) about the topic at the end of the post is a great best practice for ‘what’ posts.Download a Free “What Is” Blog Post Template HereExamples:What in the Heck Is Co-Marketing?What’s the Deal With This Whole ‘Context Marketing’ Thing?What Is a Landing Page and Why Should You Care?7) The ‘Why’ Post In a Nutshell: Posts that explain why.These posts are great when you’re trying to call attention to and emphasize the importance or significance of a certain topic, whether it be a trend, a tool, or a concept in general. Given their nature, these types of posts tend to be pretty introductory as well. In these posts, it’s smart to back up your why argument with supporting examples, facts, and statistics that will help convince the reader the topic is something they should care about. Think about it as something of a persuasive article.Examples:Why Purchasing Email Lists Is Always a Bad IdeaWhy You (Yes, You) Need to Create More Landing PagesWhy You Should Consider Inbound BEFORE Your Next Site Redesign8) The Feature StoryIn a Nutshell: Posts mimicking the style of a human interest story, detailing concepts and ideas of specific market interest.This type of post is great for topics, people, or trends that are worth more in-depth, detailed research and commentary. One of the more journalistic types of blog posts, these articles tend to be hard to define in a blanket statement and more of a “you’ll know it when you see it” kind of post.Examples: The Best Marketer in Silicon Valley Is Doing Everything You’re Not Supposed to DoI’m Not You, You’re Not Me. So Why Do We Have the Same Internet?Billion Dollar Babies: Are All These Little Companies Really Worth $1 Billion?9) The FAQ Post In a Nutshell: Posts that adopt a question and answer (Q&A) format.The FAQ post is another format that’s great for beginner bloggers, considering the Q&A format is a built in template. These posts are great for addressing common questions your audience has, grouped under a specific topic.A great way to generate posts like these is to ask your sales and services departments — the people who are talking to prospective and current customers all the time — to write down any common questions they hear. You can also collect questions you get from blog and social media commentary, as well as attendee questions during webinars. These questions are great fodder for Q&A type posts, and as a result, they can become great resources for your sales and services teams as well.Examples: Answers to Your Top 7 Questions About Mastering LinkedInAnswers to Your Top 7 Questions From the Science of Inbound MarketingAnswers to Your Top 9 Questions About Using LinkedIn Ads10) The Interview Post In a Nutshell: Posts that feature quoted perspectives of a third party.Similar to Q&A formatted posts — since these posts may also be formatted as Q&As — is the interview post. Fantastic for introducing the perspective of a third party on a particular topic, interview posts are also great for developing relationships with the industry experts or influencers you interview. They also open up the opportunity for greater reach, especially if the interviewee shares the resulting post with their networks.Examples:The Future of Inbound: Shel Israel Looks Ahead to ‘The Age of Context’Being Full of Sh*t Doesn’t Work AnymoreA Chat With a Marketer Who Has to Fight for His Budget11) The SlideShare PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that feature an embedded SlideShare presentation.Posts that are built around a specific SlideShare presentation do require a little bit more time investment and design savvy than the average text-based post, but the results are usually worth it. Content that lends itself well (but isn’t limited) to SlideShare presentations include the curation of visual examples, quotes, charts, quick takeaways, and general storytelling. SlideShare-focused posts also make great social media fodder, since visual content is so shareable and social friendly (Hint: LinkedIn also owns SlideShare ;-)Examples:7 Lessons From the World’s Most Captivating Presenters [SlideShare]15 Pearls of Wisdom From the Legendary David Ogilvy [SlideShare]S%*t PR People Do That Journalists Hate [SlideShare]12) The Infographic Post In a Nutshell: Posts that feature an infographic.Similar to the SlideShare post, the infographic post is also one that is high commitment and high reward. Infographics, when done well, are very sharable and likely to generate inbound links, but you do need some design chops to pull them off — or the money to outsource their creation to a designer. Infographics are great for compiling data and statistics in a visual way. They’re also great for organizing information in a timeline format, or presenting visual tips.Download a Free Infographic Blog Post Template HereExamples:What a Real Relationship in Social Media Should Look Like [INFOGRAPHIC]20 of the Most Memorable Marketing Moments in 2012 [INFOGRAPHIC]The History of Marketing: An Exhaustive Timeline [INFOGRAPHIC]13) The NewsjackIn a Nutshell: Timely posts that capitalize on something in the news.If you’re unfamiliar with the term, newsjacking refers to the practice of leveraging the popularity of a news story to support your sales and marketing goals. It requires the careful monitoring of news, and when done correctly, a newsjack post will relevantly tie the news to your industry in a timely fashion.To identify and capitalize on newsjacking opportunities, load up your RSS reader with a combination of popular news publications and popular industry publications — anywhere you could potentially discover news relevant to what your audience cares about. Never jacked the news before? Check out these four simple newsjack formulas to follow.Download a Free Newsjacking Blog Post Template HereExamples: Facebook Finally Rolls Out Graph Search to U.S. UsersTwitter Starts Highlighting Websites That Embed TweetsFacebook Launches Video on Instagram, Giving Twitter a Run for Its Money Originally published Jul 19, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated April 09 2019 How to Write a Blog Post Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Should I Gate This Content? [Flowchart]

first_imgWe marketers seem to like rules. (And when none exist, we’ll settle for guidelines.) Those of us who write about the marketing space appear to recognize this tendency, which is why you’ll find so many benchmarking reports, how-to articles, and definitive lists for marketers.Some challenges, however, are too nuanced for a binary best practice.Download 195+ visual marketing design templates to use for social media posts, infographics, and more. Take the “Should I gate my content?” question, for example. Bloggers have looked at the topic through various lenses — from SEO to lead generation to channel-specific implications — yet nobody appears to have written a simple “gate this, don’t gate that” prescription. This is likely because the decision always comes down to a single question — Is the viewer’s identity a fair price to pay for this content? — and that’s difficult to answer universally. Yet considering elements like content quality, objectivity, utility, and format can help marketers make a more informed decision and avoid awkward choices like asking someone to fill out a form to see their own name on a list (true story!).I suppose this is a long way of saying that we’re here to help. HubSpot created a flowchart to help guide marketers’ gating decisions. While it might not be a hard rule — there are plenty of content types, objectives, and considerations that the chart doesn’t take into account — it’s hopefully a useful guideline. And at the very least, the next time your boss asks why you didn’t gate that blog post, you can blame your decision on us.193Save (Click to enlarge the flowchart.)193Save Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 12, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated August 27 2017 Content Types Topics:last_img read more

A Vivid Vision for HubSpot’s Content

first_imgThe program began as it always did — with a spritely, “Welcome to INBOUND Radio on SiriusXM channel 125.” Host Mike Volpe went on to introduce the day’s guests. First up was a prominent Stanford medical researcher, who’d made a breakthrough in Parkinson’s treatment thanks to the millions of iPhone and Apple Watch users who volunteered to have their health monitored through their mobile devices. “Giving away your health data is about as inbound as it gets,” observed Volpe when he wrapped up the interview from HubSpot’s brand new Cambridge recording studio.Although this scenario hasn’t yet occurred, don’t call it fiction. It’s more like pre-reality, or, in the words of executive-turned-executive-coach Cameron Herold, a “vivid vision.”Herold, the former COO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK, has become one of the world’s most sought-after speakers and advisors. Simply put, he helps top CEOs perform even better. One of Herold’s most popular techniques is what he calls a vivid vision. Think of it as a drug-free executive Peyote trip, in which the leader of an organization travels ahead three years and returns clutching a hyper-detailed narrative of the company’s future state. A well-crafted vivid vision is a little trippy in that it describes the sights, sounds, mood, energy, and dialogues surrounding events that have not yet occurred.After listening to Herold explain this concept on The Growth Show podcast, I decided to give it a try on behalf of the HubSpot content team. I booked some alone time in the company nap room, conjured up Doc Brown and hopped aboard my mind’s Delorean. Destination: 2018.Constructing a Vivid VisionThe exercise was, admittedly, awkward — perhaps even corny — at first. Self-awareness got the better of me, and I struggled to visualize reality beyond the end of the year, much less the mid-point of the next U.S. President’s term. I also defaulted to math — mentally calculating traffic and conversions by compounding today’s growth rates. I thought of the same people, in the same seats, doing the same jobs. Just better. In other words, I was doing it all wrong.Then I remembered the source of the vivid vision process: Olympic athletes. Herold explained that high-achieving athletes painstakingly visualize the outcome of their events in advance of competing. Suddenly, the exercise felt less new agey. I put the flux capacitor back to work.Questions raced at me. Would we have a blog? If so, what would it look like? Who would be reading it? What about ebooks? Did people still read them? And the podcast that triggered this post … what kind of guests would we host?Once I shut off (or at least suppressed) my self-monitor, the exercise became enjoyable. Indulgent even. I imagined teaching a Columbia J-school class on business blogs. I heard several students rebuke me for hobbling “real” journalism. I pre-lived a conversation with the managing editor of our blog, who insisted writers should get bonuses based on scoops, not leads. She mentioned a specific blogger who would get angry when she’d be scooped by a commercial blog. The editor wanted to permeate this competitive spirit throughout the team. I overheard HubSpot bloggers complain about the very same issues that have long irritated traditional journalists; I saw press badges for massive industry events hung in bloggers’ workspaces; I feared my analytics person might get poached by BuzzFeed, which was now seen as The New York Times for the post-Millennial generation. I found this observation so horrifying that it nearly shook me out of my vision.My content strategists had evolved into research analysts. They were routinely invited to deliver on-air commentary about sales and marketing trends for various cable networks. They snickered when Fox Business called, knowing how the network rankled me. HubSpot’s podcaster and I tried to figure out if we could get (still) Apple CEO Tim Cook to mention The Growth Show during the company’s next press event.It took me a while, but eventually I got the idea: A vivid vision isn’t just dragging a formula forward in Excel. It’s rethinking the application.Now it’s your turn. Check out Cameron Herald’s interview with Mike Volpe on The Growth Show. And then go back to envision your own company’s future. You’ll be excited to see what’s waiting there. Leadership Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Mar 19, 2015 5:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

The Business Case for Social Selling [Infographic]

first_imgThis post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Sales Blog. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.If you haven’t started incorporating social media into your sales process, you’re not alone. According to a survey from PeopleLinx, only 31% of sellers currently use social to sell.But a quick look at the data backing social selling indicates that the trend will only get stronger in the years to come. For instance, 79% of salespeople who actively engage on social media outperform their peers, and over half of buyers consult social channels as part of their research processes — up from 19% in 2012.While there’s no shame in not being a social seller today, salespeople who refuse to join the party will get left behind in the near future. Need some convincing? Check out the data in the following infographic from Sales For Life. Better to join the ranks of social sellers late than never.484Save 484Save Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Apr 4, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017center_img Social Selling Topics:last_img read more

India vs England, Women’s World Cup T20 Semi-Final Live Streaming: When, Where to Watch Match Coverage on Hotstar

first_imgIndia will be looking to erase the memories of a heart-breaking World Cup final defeat last year when they take on England in the semi-finals of the ICC Women’s World Twenty20 on Friday morning.England beat India by nine runs in an exciting final of the 50-over global meet, a tournament that ushered a new era for women’s cricket in India.To their credit, India have been able to build on that momentum and a fantastic run in the ongoing World T20 is a testimony to that.India beat two formidable teams in their group — the ‘White Ferns’ from New Zealand by 34 runs and the ‘Southern Stars’ from Australia by 48 runs — maintaining an all-win record at the league stage.Read – Women’s World T20: Momentum, not revenge buzzword for India vs EnglandHowever, England, the reigning ODI world champions, are a quality side in the shortest format and the scars of the summit clash loss at Lord’s can play on the minds of Mithali Raj and Harmanpreet Kaur, the two pillars of the women’s side.Skipper Harmanpreet’s performance will be key to India’s success as she is known to rise to the occasion. The Moga-born cricketer can be safely termed as someone who is a ‘big match’ player.Even in the current World T20, she has performed in two group league matches — a match-winning century against New Zealand and a quick-fire 43 against Australia — which proved to be decisive in the final context of the game.She is currently leading the tournament run-chart with 167 runs from four games at a strike rate of 177 plus. Smriti Mandhana, with 144 runs, is fourth on the list.advertisementAgainst England, India will have their senior-most player Mithali Raj back in the side after being rested for the final group game against Australia as she was nursing a niggle suffered while fielding against Ireland. She will come back in place of spinner Anuja Patil.Leg-spinner Poonam Yadav (8 wickets) and left-arm spinner Radha Yadav (7 wickets) have been consistent throughout the tournament. Off-spinners Deepti Sharma (4 wickets) and Dayalan Hemlatha (5 wickets) have also kept things tight.For England, the focus will be more on their seam attack, comprising Anya Shrubsole (7 wickets) and Natalie Sciver (4 wickets). They have been very economical and have kept Bangladesh and South Africa under 100 runs.However, Dani Wyatt (28 in 3 games) and skipper Heather Knight (31 in three games) haven’t yet been tested save the game against West Indies, where England managed only 115 for 8 batting first and subsequently lost the match by four wickets.What time does the Women’s World T20 semi-final between India vs England start?Women’s World T20 semi-final between India and England starts at 5.30AM IST on November 23, Friday at North Sound, Antigua.What TV channel and live stream is the Women’s World T20 semi-final between India and England Live Streaming on?Star Sports 1 and Star Sports 1 HD in English commentary and Star Sports 3 and Star Sports 3 HD in Hindi Commentary. Hotstar, JioTV and Airtel TV will live stream India vs England match.Where will the Women’s World T20 semi-final between India and England be played?The Women’s World T20 semi-final between India and England will be played at North Sound in Antigua from 5.30AM IST.Where can I watch the India vs England Women’s World T20 semi-final live?The match will be shown in Star Sports network and can also be streamed on hotstar.com.Where can I check the online live updates of the India vs England Women’s World T20 semi-final?You can follow our ball-by-ball-updates of the match between India vs England from our live blog on indiatoday.in.What are the squads for the Women’s World T20 semi-final between India and England?India: Harmanpreet Kaur (captain), Smriti Mandhana, Jemimah Rodrigues, Mithali Raj, Deepti Sharma, Dayalan Hemalatha, Veda Krishnamurthy, Arundhati Reddy, Radha Yadav, Poonam Yadav, Ekta Bisht, Taniya Bhatia (wk), Mansi Joshi, Devika Vaidya, Anuja Patil.England: Heather Knight (captain), Tammy Beaumont, Sophia Dunkley, Sophie Ecclestone, Tash Farran, Kirstie Gordon, Jenny Gunn, Danielle Hazell, Amy Jones, Natalie Sciver, Anya Shrubsole, Linsey Smith, Fran Wilson, Lauren Winfield, Danielle Wyatt.(With inputs from PTI)last_img read more

How Your Agency Can Prevent Data Overload and Build a Streamlined Reporting Approach

first_imgPick a “good” client that utilizes the majority, if not all, of the data systems used to support their media strategy.Gather the account and media teams that support this client around a whiteboard.Build a measurement strategy. The teams should work together to review/develop the key performance indicators (KPIs) needed to demonstrate value for this client.Build a data strategy. Identify all of the data systems that contain the key data metrics needed to support the measurement strategy and make a list for each system.Build a reporting strategy. In a single page dashboard, mock-up a report design of what the elements would be to demonstrate the value of the campaign.Launch a data engine. Implement a process to bring all of this data together into a single source to enable the use of any reporting/data visualization tool to make these strategies come to life.While I have used this recipe for success for the past ten years, success ultimately begins with a change in thinking and a desire to have your agency operate like Analytics Annie. Without this desire and commitment, the agency simply won’t be successful in analytics long-term. APIs are usually preferred, but not all source systems have APIs. Often times, they simply aren’t very good. In other cases, some data (like TV buys) lives in files instead of in a system.Most agencies, however, run very lean and instead rely on external marketing data management platforms. These platforms already have all the API and ETL connections in place so that agencies are able to authenticate their media sources and get access to their consolidated data very quickly.Move from Reporting to AnalysisRegardless of the solution, the Marketing Marys of the world can reduce their reporting prep time by up to 90% once they fix their data collection problem.A marketer’s time shouldn’t be spent collecting the information, or even reporting on it. It should be spent using that information to optimize their marketing efforts and increase gains (achieving goals).That’s why Analytics Annies are the stars of the marketing world. They have the time to dive into the meaning of the data, develop insightful recommendations and do actual analysis, not just build reports. Analytics Annies are so successful in their role because they:Automatically update their reporting nightly.Optimize budgets across all channels with clear attribution modeling.Consolidate their offline and online media performance to a single chart.Roll up all their agency-wide metrics into a single holistic view. Love it or hate it, data is essential to any agency professional’s existence.And where there’s data, there’s reporting. Marketers can’t and (shouldn’t) avoid reporting, so they have to increasingly become proficient with it.As clients have become more knowledgeable and demanding about reporting, their analysis and insights expectations have become higher. This adds additional stress to agency teams trying to manage more data, more frequently, and from more media sources.Subscribe to HubSpot’s Agency newsletter today.Data analysis can often seem like a painful burden, and marketers today are either avoiding it, or going crazy trying to make sense of the data overload by purchasing reporting tools to solve their problem.This leads us to wonder how the Marketing Marys and Analytics Annies of the agency world are solving their own marketing data reporting problems. With the sheer number of data sets to analyze, decipher and review, the life of marketing reporting analyst is becoming ever more complex.So how are agencies approaching this data problem? Let’s take a look at a day in the (reporting) life of Marketing Mary and Analytics Annie, each responsible for client reporting at their respective agencies.The Story of Two MarketersIt’s the first day of the month and Marketing Mary is starting the “Data Death March:” the painful task of manually gathering media channel data for month-end client reporting. This can take days — sometimes weeks of effort — only to spit out a basic report recapping what happened last month that the client will hopefully read.For Analytics Annie, the first day of the month is no different than any other day. She opens a client report (automatically refreshed with current media results), begins to analyze performance and develops timely, insightful recommendations to share with her client.Annie’s reports aren’t just a spreadsheet of numbers — they are factual bits of information organized in an easy-to-read report that shows not only the state of the union — but what and how to improve their marketing efforts.Data First, Then ReportingSo what’s the difference between Marketing Mary and Analytics Annie? Many might say Analytics Annie has a fancy data visualization tool to make her reporting automated. And they may be right — or she could actually just be looking at a report in Excel.The real reason Analytics Annie is able to spend her time on impactful analysis for her clients has nothing to do with her reporting tool of choice. It’s because she solved her underlying media data collection problem by way of automation.Mary, at some point, likely succumbed to using a data visualization tool for her reporting that promised all the bells and whistles. It looked good, seemed simple to use, and was going to take all the pain away to allow her agency to make reporting for all her clients effortless.But the tool wasn’t even collecting the necessary data to begin with. The challenge Mary was facing wasn’t a tool problem, it was a data problem. Without having the underlying data in a usable format to begin with, she was still manually gathering and preparing her media data, leaving no time for analysis.She put too much faith in the tool to solve her reporting problems that in the end, all she had was prettier dashboards, but not better or faster ones.Because Annie knew that she had to solve her data collection problem first, it made finding the right reporting tool much easier to justify and use, freeing up her time for analysis.A Single Source of TruthSolving the underlying media and marketing data aggregation problem is both simple and complex. The simple part? You need one single location (like a data warehouse or a marketing data management platform) to store all of your media data together.The hard part? Automating the data collection into the warehouse, building relationships between the disparate data sources, cleaning up jacked campaign tracking parameters and maintaining the integrity and accuracy of the data.A few agencies with large teams dedicated full-time to managing the agency’s data platform can do it in house using a data warehouse, like Amazon Redshift. If you do it yourself, you need to input the data in an automated fashion. Typically this will happens in two ways: Using History to Drive PlanningWhen you fix your agency’s approach to data and integrate all media channel data for all clients in one single location, the agency’s ability to drive data-driven media planning and forecasting exponentially increases.For Mary, client media planning revolves around crawling through monthly presentations, tracking down historical spreadsheets from different team members, and pulling an all-nighter in a conference room with bad takeout food to piece together some sort of educated plan for the client — only to know that this exercise is the first of many to come.For Annie however, simply accessing her single source of truth to analyze all media performance over a number of years, visualize media mix patterns and changes, and aligning these patterns to spend and performance, happens dynamically within a few minutes.Not only does this approach yield real data-driven planning grounded in accurate data, Annie is spared the heartburn and fatigue from the all-nighter and greasy takeout food.Building a Winning Data ApproachIn this scenario, Marketing Mary represents what most agencies are struggling with today. In fact, I think it is safe to say that most agencies have historically treated analytics as a means to justify their strategies and tactics. This lack of focus has created thousands of exhausted Marketing Marys everywhere in the agency industry.To fix the marketing data problem, agencies need a data engine and a solid analytics strategy. The steps below are a good place to start: Topics: Originally published Nov 29, 2016 5:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Build APIs into the source systems.Create an ETL process to upload source files. Data-Driven Marketing Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

The 8 Best Startup Logos From Shark Tank, and Why They Work

first_img7) TranquiloThe pitch: The Tranquilo Mat is a portable vibrating mat that soothes baby in the crib, stroller, or on the go! The mat helps baby transition from a mother’s womb to the world during the “fourth trimester” after birth.The logotype is an expressive and playful script that embodies the feel-good of the soothing mat. The friendly curves of the hand-scripted font and the light green color create an approachable and optimistic vibe. Slogans & Taglines If you’re a young startup just beginning to find your footing in the business world, having a quality, professional-looking logo can help you look great in front of potential investors and clearly establish what your brand stands for.Designing a logo that is simple enough to be absorbed and understood quickly, but still conveys the many meanings a brand might depend on is not an easy task. Generating creative logo ideas can be very time-consuming.On ABC’s Shark Tank, companies only have a few minutes to pitch their business to the panel of investors, which means their logo needs to say a lot about what kind of business they are.Download Now: Free Brand Building GuideI’ve examined 96 companies from Shark Tank, Season 8 (check the full list here) and selected the best Shark Tank logos, explaining in-depth why each logo works and which design elements make it great.The process of designing a logo requires an enormous amount of patience and an obsession with getting it right. So whether you’re a designer looking for some inspiration or an entrepreneur looking for logo design ideas for your business — you’re in the right place! Check out my analysis of the logos below to inspire your own design.8 Best Shark Tank LogosToymailEdnVibesLaidBrandRinseKitChirpsTranquiloBiemHow do you judge a logo? 2) Edn The pitch: Edn is a seed pod to grow your tiny garden indoor. Now anyone can master growing herbs, vegetables and flowers within the comfort of their home. The Small Garden’s soil-free technology takes care of your plants, so you don’t need to. The seed pods are dirt-free, so there’s no mess to clean up.The wordmark feels very light and clean. The line over the “e” adds some character to it and marks the accent. The turquoise color adds a sense of nature and an organic feel to this slim and elegant typography. I have judged all the Shark Tank logos by the following five criteria:Simplicity: Is the design simple and clean enough to be flexible and easily recognizable? Is it not too busy, distracting, or confusing?Memorability: Is it quickly recognizable? Is it clever? Will people only have to spend a second or two thinking about it to get it?Timelessness: Will it still be a great logo in 10, 20, or even 50 years?Versatility: Does it scale to different sizes without losing quality or clarity? Will it work across various media and within different contexts?Appropriateness: Does it resonate with the desired audience and industry of the business? 4) LaidBrandThe pitch:  LaidBrand is a pheromone-enriched hair care. Pheromones are naturally occurring chemicals in humans, and to put it simply without getting too technical, pheromones trigger responses. Whether you are trying to attract a mate or just exude that extra boost of confidence, pheromones play a huge part in achieving those desires.The new wordmark is quite elegant and striking and the characteristic cuts on both sides add some sexy touch to it. There’s a great harmony between the cuts and the middle “A” letters. Overall, a great logo that sets a strong tone and makes it feel like something completely different. Don’t forget to share this post! 5) RinseKit The pitch: RinseKit is the only portable shower to have the pressure of a garden hose without pumping or batteries. With up to 4 minutes of spray time, RinseKit’s 2 gallon system holds pressure for over a month.Overall, this is a very bold and dynamic logo. I like the underline that symbolizes a stream of water. Very confident, flat design with a special treatment that makes it look unique. It’s a complete conceptual and graphic solution. A good logo is distinctive, appropriate, practical, graphic, simple in form, and conveys an intended message. The most successful companies continue to say:Simpler is better.And these companies definitely made the right hiring decision, whether they hired an independent design or a design agency, their logos came out well executed.I’m going to judge these Shark Tank logos only in terms of their pure visual aesthetics without discussing the whole identity system, and how these logos work on the applications like websites, stationery design etc.Simple ≠ EasyRemember that the simplest ideas often require many hours of tweaking design concepts. Simplicity is something that is achieved by eliminating unnecessary elements — going from a visual clutter to a visual essence.Principles of a Good Logo  The 8 Best Startup Logos from Shark Tank Season 81) Toymail The pitch: Toymail is a toy with hidden components inside that allow you to send a message to your kids. With just a push of a button, kids can connect to Mom, Dad, grandparents, or friends at any time, from anywhere. Parents use the Toymail app to send messages. Approve your child’s trusted circle through the Toymail app. The logo is attractive for its unique toy-contour and a modern geometric typeface. The icon and the wordmark use a one-weight line which sets a unified style. The bright pink color is appropriate for a toy-company. 6) Chirps The pitch: Chirps are chips made of bugs — crickets. When we first started Chirps, many people told us to hide the fact that our foods have bugs and just talk about the nutritional benefits. That’s not us. We started Chirps because we want people to know that bugs are delicious, nutritious, and sustainable.It is a crisp and bold icon that has a great presence. Very impressive logo. The subtle modifications to the “i” letter turn it into a bug which perfectly embodies the main ingredient: bugs. Originally published Nov 6, 2017 6:00:00 AM, updated November 06 2017 8) BiemThe pitch:  Biem is the handheld device that transforms a stick of real butter to a spray in seconds, making cooking, home entertaining, and baking infinitely easier.I like the concept of the “i” being a spray bottle with the spray beam coming out of it, which captures perfectly what it is about in a simple way. The beam is neither too big nor too small to serve as a graphic trigger for something memorable.Feature image credit: ABC 3) Vibes The pitch: Vibes are designed to enhance your live music experience. They lower decibel levels of your environment without sacrificing sound clarity. You hear true natural sound the way it was intended: clear, clean, controlled.The minimalist execution is perfectly calibrated with a sturdy sans serif, just the right amount of airy letter-spacing. The icon adopts the silhouette of the earplugs and highlights the first letter in a distinctive & unique way. Topics:last_img read more

Innovators to Receive Support to Commercialise Ideas

first_imgThe National Commission on Science and Technology (NCST) and the Scientific Research Council (SRC) are galvanising their resources to help local innovators develop their ideas for commercialisation.The objective is to increase the role of science, technology and innovation in achieving sustainable social and economic development.As a first activity, the entities hosted a workshop at The Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston on January 24 for winners and shortlisted candidates in the 2014, 2016, and 2018 national innovation competitions.The event provided an opportunity for the participants to benefit from support aimed at strengthening their capacity for developing and launching their inventions, and to benefit from information-sharing and network-building.In attendance were representatives of innovation support centres at the University of the West Indies (UWI), University of Technology (UTech), Northern Caribbean University (NCU), and Caribbean Maritime University (CMU).Agencies such as the Jamaica Intellectual Property Office (JIPO), Jamaica Manufacturers and Exporters’ Association (JMEA), Bronson Centre, Jamaica Business Development Corporation (JBDC), and Development Bank of Jamaica (DBJ) were also on hand to engage the innovators.Director General for the NCST, Professor Errol Morrison, in his remarks at the opening ceremony said that the workshop provides an “excellent opportunity to bring innovating minds together to show off and improve on what you are doing. Much of what we are doing will help you to improve in presenting your business and innovations”.He noted that the structure of the innovation awards has changed to now include pre- and post-awards capacity-building activities in order to “identify outstanding potential projects and take (them) to that next step”.Marketing Manager at the SRC, Carolyn Rose Miller, emphasised the importance of developing the ideas and innovations unearthed by the awards into viable businesses.“What really needs to happen is an institutionalised post-award programme to ensure that these innovative, great ideas are not only recognised but provide hand-holding support, coaching, financial support to take the innovation successfully to commercialisation,” she said.“It is only in this way that our economy will grow; by providing innovative solutions and also exporting these ideas. The SRC, along with the NCST is committed to making this process a success,” she added.A committee has been established, chaired by the SRC, to design activities to engage participants of the innovation competition in order to build their capacity to take advantage of the potential of their innovations and ideas, and connect them to available local resources.The workshop introduced participants to a programme developed by the California-based innovation management corporation, The Vault, used to facilitate consultations with enterprises of various sizes, to scale and expand their businesses.last_img read more

Magazines Respond to Instagram Terms of Service Fiasco

first_img“The language we proposed also raised questions about whether your photos can be part of an advertisement. We do not have plans for anything like this and because of that we’re going to remove the language that raised the question,” the company’s co-founder, Kevin Systrom, said in the post. “It was interpreted by many that we were going to sell your photos to others without any compensation. This is not true and it is our mistake that this language is confusing. To be clear: it is not our intention to sell your photos. We are working on updated language in the terms to make sure this is clear.”NatGeo’s Instagram Account Goes DarkWhile Instagram responded quickly, so did some magazine publishers. As of this morning, National Geographic suspended its account by posting the image to the right, which was also sent out to the brand’s photographers.”Last night, we shared on our Instagram feed that we have concerns about the new terms of service,” said National Geographic in a statement provided to FOLIO:. “While we appreciate the sentiments in the Instagram blog post from Kevin Systrom, we still need a better understanding of the specific amendments to the proposed new terms of service before determining how best to proceed with our account.”A Conversation About IP Web RightsOther brands, like Condé Nast’s women’s title Self, alerted readers to the changes, who had strong reactions.“Instagram is part of Self‘s social DNA and it continues to play a major role not only as a means of visual storytelling but as vehicle for conversation with our readers,” Stephanie Miller, Self’s social media editor, tells FOLIO:. “Given the new terms, 90 of 100 Self Twitter followers told us that they will delete their accounts. When we tweeted ‘5 Things to Know About Instagram Changes,’ over 120 people retweeted the news within five minutes. It was an above average response that demonstrates how passionate and engaged Self readers are within the space. It’s unfortunate that we’ll potentially lose a robust user base on a quick and easy photo sharing platform—an app that has allowed us to evolve as a brand and spark popular trends such as encouraging readers to show us their #ArmParty and #NailArt.”While Miller did concede that it is necessary to monetize a social platform, and acknowledged Systrom’s response, she stopped short of saying Systrom’s statement would lead to a fix for Instagram and its users.“But I’ve seen it happen before,” she said. “Companies simply right-click on photos and sell them as generic images overseas. [This AdWeek article is] another example. I get it. It’s monetization. I know how the Internet works, and developments like this are necessary for social start-ups to make money.”Miller adds that while this does leave brands in a tough spot or sticky situation, this is nothing new—the social media editor pointed to another free social platform that gathers data and insight in order to turn a profit: Facebook. Facebook’s terms of service state the following: “For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.”“The whole Instagram uproar is more of a conversation about IP Web rights than it is about a popular photo sharing app,” adds Miller. “Privacy in the world of social media is an oxymoron. From the Self brand perspective, we’ll adhere to a ‘watch and see’ approach until we have further counsel from our legal team, but we won’t be deleting our account immediately. The sky is not falling. There have been many arguments, for and against the changes, but we still consider Instagram a valuable part of our social strategy.”Stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, follow us on Facebook & Twitter! Yesterday was not a good day for Instagram. Users and brands slammed the social network for changing its privacy policy and terms of service to include the following language:“You agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you.”Several hours after announcing these changes, the Facebook-owned company back peddled, saying in a blog post that it would not go through with that or other actions.last_img read more

Baker Hughes tries to reassure investors as Halliburton deal fails

first_imgBaker Hughes Inc sought to reassure investors on Monday by announcing a $2.5 billion plan to buy back stock and pay down debt, using the breakup fee it will receive following the collapse of its long-stalled takeover by fellow oilfield services provider Halliburton Inc.Now each company must map out a strategy to thrive on its own. Both had hoped the merger would help them weather the worst oil price crash in a generation, which has caused hundreds of thousands of layoffs across the industry.Wall Street analysts said Halliburton should be in better shape than Baker Hughes but praised Baker Hughes’ plan to cut annual costs by some $500 million in an oversupplied market while repurchasing shares.”(This) equates to meaningful upside potential to earnings estimates in 2016 and 2017″ for Baker Hughes, UBS analyst Angeline Sedita said in a note to clients.Baker Hughes said proceeds from a $3.5 billion breakup fee from Halliburton would fund a $1.5 billion share buyback and the repayment of $1 billion of debt.Shares of Halliburton rose 2.6 percent to $42.36 on Monday, while Baker Hughes fell 2.8 percent to $47.04.Baker Hughes has faced employee turnover and cutbacks ever since Halliburton announced plans 18 months ago to buy it in a deal first valued at $35 billion.Regulators in the United States and overseas frowned upon the transaction, calling it a threat to competition and innovation. That led both sides to scrap the agreement on Sunday.The U.S. Justice Department had filed a lawsuit last month to stop the deal, saying it would leave only two dominant oilfield services companies, the merged Halliburton-Baker Hughes entity and global market leader Schlumberger Ltd.Baker Hughes, which is developing products that lower costs and maximise production for oil and gas producers, also said on Monday it planned to refinance a $2.5 billion credit facility, which expires in September.The company said an initial phase of cost-cutting should result in $500 million of annualised savings by the end of 2016.In a separate regulatory filing on Monday, Baker Hughes said it had cut 2,000 more jobs in the first quarter, adding to worldwide reductions of 18,000 last year. The company had about 43,000 employees as of Dec. 31. Baker Hughes said on Wednesday that it recorded after-tax “merger-retained” costs of $110 million in the first quarter, leading to a bigger net loss for the period.The Houston-based company also said then that it was limiting its exposure to the unprofitable onshore pressure pumping business in North America.Halliburton, which will release its first-quarter results on Tuesday, said on April 22 that revenue for the period slumped 40 percent.Shares of Baker Hughes have fallen 25 percent since the merger deal was announced in November 2014. Halliburton stock declined more than 19 percent in that time.last_img read more

Islamic Stateinspired terror group plotted to poison water sources in Mumbai

first_imgRepresentative ImageReutersThe Maharashtra Anti-Terrorist Squad have said that ISIS-inspired militant youths planned to poison water sources in Mumbai. The plot was revealed during the investigation of the Mumbra temple poisoning case.The Ummat-E-Mohammaddiya group, which is reported to have links with the Islamic State, had planned to poison the temple offering at the Mumbreshwar Mahadev temple’s Shrimadh Bhagwat Katha in Mumbra last year. The offering was to be consumed by 40,000 devotees during the festival in December. New findings by ATS revealed that the terror group was also planning to poison water bodies all over the Mumbai city that would have led to mass deaths, reported DNA.The report said that accused Jaman Nawab Khuteupad, who is also a chemical expert, had prepared the vicious concoction before they were arrested. The 32-year-old worked as a pharmacist at the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and was a key member of the militant group.Around 10 members of the group were arrested in January by the ATS before the group carried out the operation. A detailed charge sheet based on an investigation by ATS submitted before the Mumbai High Court in July said that the suspected terrorists were inspired by contentious preacher Zakir Naik.The accused have been identified as Abu Hamza, Fahad Ansari, Talha Potrik, Mohsin Khan alias Abu Marya, Mohammad Takky Khan alias Abu Khalid, Atai Waris Abdul Rashid Shaikh alias Mazhar, Salman Khan alias Abu Ubeda, Mushahed Ul-Islam, Jaman Nawab Khuteupad alias Abu Kital and a minor.Apart from Khuteupad who prepared poison, another member, identified as Talha Potrick, also played a major role as a recruiter for carrying out the operation. The police were alerted after some recruits backed-off and tipped the police about the group’s operation plans.last_img read more

Juba Leagues attack leads to transport strike in Sylhet

first_imgMap of SylhetTransport owners and workers will go on an indefinite strike in the Sylhet district from Wednesday morning to press home their two-point demand, reports UNB news agency.Sylhet Transport Workers’ Union President Selim Ahmed Falik came up with the announcement at a meeting held at the Sylhet Central Bus Terminal at 5:00pm on Tuesday.The announcement came following the attack on transport workers allegedly by a group of Juba League leaders at Tajmahal Hotel at 2:00pm on Tuesday.The two-point demand includes immediate arrest of the attackers, who assaulted the transport workers and hotel workers, and the recovery of illegal arms.Falik alleged the leaders and activists of local unit of Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) and Juba League carried out the attack on the transport workers twice earlier.BCL is the student wing of ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) while Juba League is the youth front.last_img read more

BNP shares concerns over polls with diplomats

first_imgLogo of BNPBNP on Monday briefed foreign diplomats stationed in Dhaka about the outcome of the two-phase dialogue with the ruling alliance and the party’s various concerns about the 11th parliamentary elections, reports UNB.BNP standing committee member Abdul Moyeen Khan, on behalf of the party, also apprised the diplomats of the party’s various observations on the country’s latest political situation at a closed-door meeting at BNP chairperson’s Gulshan office, said party insiders.BNP chairperson’s adviser Sabihuddin Ahmed said they briefed the foreign envoys about the country’s latest political situation.He said the meeting began around 4pm and continued for an hour.BNP organising secretary Shama Obaed said diplomats from around 35 countries, including the USA, the UK, EU, UN, Canada, India, Pakistan, China, Japan, France, Germany and Switzerland, joined the briefing.BNP standing committee members Rafiqul Islam Miah, Gayeshwar Chandra Roy and Nazrul Islam Khan, and chairperson’s adviser Sabihuddin Ahmed were, among others, present at the meeting.Shama said the BNP leaders talked about the country’s overall situation, dialogue over the election and other political issues.Wishing anonymity, a BNP leader who was present at the meeting told UNB they informed the diplomats that though they held talks with the prime minister-led 14-party alliance twice to reach a political consensus aiming to ensure a credible election, the dialogue outcome is almost zero due to the government’s ‘rigid’ stance and non-compromising attitude.They also told the foreign envoys that their party and alliances have decided to join the election for the sake of democracy, but the government and the election commission are not taking any step for ensuring a level-playing field and holding an acceptable election.The BNP leaders also talked about the continued arrest of BNP leaders and activists in ‘fictitious’ cases despite the prime minister’s assurance to stop it.”We also informed the diplomats about the election commission’s biased role in announcing the election schedule and rescheduling it,” he said.The BNP leader said they also shared their various concerns about the election.He said the foreign envoys appreciated BNP for their decision to join the election and hoped that democracy will be consolidated in Bangladesh through a fair election.last_img read more

Selfticking oscillator could be next for portable atomic clocks

first_img“Most conventional atomic clocks need a more conventional, non-atomic clock, like a quartz crystal, to keep them ticking,” William Happer tells PhysOrg.com. “We’ve developed a system that would be self-ticking, using a specific laser.” Redefining the limits of measurement accuracy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “It’s really a souped-up mode-locked laser,” Happer says. “While our laser has much in common with a mode-locked laser, there are some differences. The atoms in the vapor cell notice if the frequency of the mode-locked laser drifts and they automatically correct the frequency with no need for any external feedback loops.”Happer continues: “An important benefit of push-pull pumping with alternating circular polarization is that none of the atoms are wasted.” “In most atomic clocks,” Jau adds, “many of the atoms are wasted. Only a very few are in the clock state. With this push-pull pumping, all of the atoms are put into a clock state.”Along the way, the two discovered something interesting. “The self-modulation occurs over a limited range of laser injection current. We weren’t surprised that too little current didn’t work. What surprised us was that too much current caused the laser to stop modulating,” Happer says. Jau continues: “This new oscillator, where the polarized atoms, the modulated photons, and the laser gain centers are all coupled together has very rich and interesting physics. ”Happer does point out that these oscillators could not replace the extremely precise, but large atomic clocks that occupy whole rooms. “It’s really to improve the workings of small, portable atomic clocks,” he emphasizes. “It eliminates the need for quartz crystals or photodetectors. Hopefully, with fewer parts, it will be less expensive to manufacture, and more stable.”Jau agrees: “This is a primitive idea, how to make an atomic clock by using pure optical methods without a quartz crystal. But it works better with reduced components and power consumption.”Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Self-ticking oscillator could be next for portable atomic clocks (2007, December 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-12-self-ticking-oscillator-portable-atomic-clocks.html Happer is a scientist at Princeton University. He, along with his young colleague Yuan-Yu Jau, invented a push-pull laser-atomic oscillator that can be useful in a variety of applications, including questions of fundamental physics, use in portable atomic clocks and coherent optical combs. “We didn’t start out thinking about applications, really,” Happer says. “We’re physicists. We just wanted to see if we could make this type of oscillator work.” The results of Happer and Jau’s work can be found in Physical Review Letters: “Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator.”Jau explains that even though they didn’t set out to build a better portable atomic clock, he thinks that they have succeeded. “We believe this is the first demonstration of making an oscillator that produces an atomic-clock signal in both electrical and optical forms by purely optical means,” he says. “This is simple. There are fewer components and lower power consumption.”“The new clock needs neither a quartz crystal with its electronics nor a photodetector,” Happer adds.Jau and Happer explain that in conventional atomic clocks, a quartz crystal is used “as a flywheel to keep the clock ticking strongly, with the atoms as a weak controlling element.” They point out that if the quartz crystal fails, the clock will cease working. “These are the types of clocks used in GPS satellites and in cell-phone towers,” Happer says.Jau points out that better precision is becoming increasingly necessary: “Mini atomic clocks can be helpful. There are many systems now working faster and faster, and transmitting large quantities of data, especially in high-speed communications. A laser atomic clock like this would be less complicated than the conventional kind, with comparable precision.”The push-pull laser-atomic oscillator built by the two consists of a semiconductor laser with alkali-metal vapor (in this case Potassium) in the external cavity. A time independent current is used to pump the semiconductor laser. “The laser will automatically modulate its light and its electrical impedance at the clock frequency of the atoms,” Happer says. This in turn eliminates the need for an external modulator, like the quartz crystal, or for a photodetector. Explore furtherlast_img read more