INSIDE OUT

first_imgA.J. Ouellette’s rise from walk-on to one of the MAC’s top threats Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 31, 2016 at 8:07 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21center_img A.J. Ouellette was Ohio’s fifth-string running back on the bus to Kent State. The freshman walk-on was there to only play special teams in the team’s 2014 season opener.But three Ohio running backs fumbled a combined four times in the second half, blowing a seven-point halftime lead. Each was taken out. Then the fourth-string back got injured. Ouellette was the only option left.With the game tied at 14, Ohio had the ball in its own territory with a few minutes on the clock. Ouellette, in his first career drive, rushed six times, helping Ohio set up a game-winning field goal as time expired.Just four weeks earlier, the 5-foot-10, 203-pound Ouellette wasn’t even if sure if he’d be on the team. It took him all of 16 days into training camp to make the roster and earn a scholarship. The junior hasn’t stopped since, emerging as one of the most dangerous offensive threats in the Mid-American Conference. Once irrelevant, overlooked and battered by Division I schools, Ouellette is now the go-to option for the run-heavy Bobcats offense poised for its eighth-straight year of bowl eligibility.“Once he took the reins, he never let go,” said Dak Notestine, Ohio’s director of strength and conditioning. “We live and die by his sword.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOuellette has been holding footballs since he was six months old. In the family’s backyard in Covington, Ohio, about 80 miles north of Cincinnati, Ouellette and his father would set up mock defenders made out of whatever they could find to jump or knock over, said his mother, Jody.That helped lay the framework for a brute running back. One who rushed for 785 yards as a freshman, the second-highest total for a rookie in Bobcats program history. One who once scored a touchdown in high school with a broken collarbone. One who led Covington (Ohio) High School to four straight league championships.Still, he didn’t draw a single D-I football offer.,The recruiting interest came and then vanished. Purdue, Akron, Marshall, North Carolina State and Miami (Ohio) each showed interest, but backed off. Ouellette submitted over 100 letters, filled out dozens of online recruiting questionnaires and sent game tape to D-I programs across the country. Save for a few Division II and Division III roster spots, he attracted no real interest. Too small, he heard.Ouellette jotted down the name of each school that overlooked him, using it as fuel. A coach at Akron quipped, “We have a lot of A.J.’s,” to Dave Miller, Ouellette’s high school coach.Ouellette added the Zips to the list.In a game against Akron midway through his freshman year of college, he ran for 74 yards, leading the Bobcats to a 23-20 win.“You just have to smile, keep moving on,” he said.Miller let schools know that Ouellette was the best player he’s coached in over 20 years. Tramain Hall, a former New Orleans Saint and Tennessee Titan who works with Ouellette at a fitness facility in Ohio, said Ouellette is capable of playing in the NFL. Hall, who’s trained Division I and NFL athletes including Houston Texans wide receiver Braxton Miller, describes Ouellette as “hungry.”“He’s from a small town, but this guy makes big time plays,” Hall said.“Everybody kept saying, ‘I can’t believe how good he is,’ but nobody offered him,” Jody Ouellette said.,In December of Ouellette’s senior year, Ohio’s offensive coordinator Tim Albin saw film of Ouellette and knew he could play Division I. But Ohio had already promised commitments to other running backs in the class, so all Albin could do was keep Ouellette on his radar. When National Signing Day passed and Albin found that Ouellette still hadn’t committed, Albin offered him preferred walk-on status.“A.J.’s going to come in and he’s going to play on special teams,” Albin told Ohio head coach Frank Solich. “I didn’t know he’d play (running back) the first game of the season,” Albin later said.Nobody did.Known as a student of the game and quiet leader, Ouellette was unanimously named a captain this year. In a mid-season contest at Buffalo last year, Ohio needed somebody to fill in at middle linebacker. Within a week, Ouellette had learned the intricacies of the defense. For two weeks, he played both ways. He recorded tackles, made catches and ran the ball at Buffalo.“If he didn’t step up, we would have been in a world of hurt,” Notestine said.The past few summers, Hall opened his facility early because Ouellette wanted to work out for 90 minutes at 8 a.m. It’s the same at Ohio.“My phone would be blowing up on weekends for extra work he wanted to do,” Notestine said. “The kid just doesn’t rest.”,This offseason, Ouellette dropped two-tenths of a second off of his 40-yard dash time (4.56). He upped his squat from 480 pounds to 510, took his bench press to 415 from 360, improved his shuttle time and added a couple inches to his vertical jump. He wants to average 5 yards per carry this year and lead his team to a MAC championship.From no Division I offers to preferred walk-on. From preferred walk-on to clear-cut starter. From starter to integral force in Ohio’s offensive attack.“I try to let the pads talk,” he said.The pads are talking.Banner photo courtesy of Ohio Athletics Comments This is placeholder text Advertisementlast_img read more

Why did Andrew Luck retire? Colts QB’s decision to end NFL career, explained

first_imgAt some point in the middle of August, Andrew Luck decided enough was enough. He was in pain yet again, and this time, the agony was not ceasing. He told Colts owner Jim Irsay and team officials he needed to retire from football in order to live the life he wants to live, a life without this kind of suffering.During the Colts’ Week 3 preseason game against the Bears, ESPN broke news of Luck’s retirement. The announcement came ahead of schedule; Luck had planned to explain his decision to the team after the Chicago game and address media the following day. Everything was accelerated once word of Luck’s retirement spread throughout Lucas Oil Stadium. Luck’s body simply would not allow it. He made roughly $97 million in seven years with the Colts, and the fact that he was scheduled to earn another $24 million over the next two years (plus more in a possible extension) further proves the difficulty of his decision.Below is Luck’s full press conference from late August, when he explained his retirement and fielded questions about the timing. In six seasons with the Colts, Luck compiled 23,671 passing yards, 171 passing touchdowns, 1,590 rushing yards and another 14 scores on the ground. That doesn’t include his numbers in the playoffs, where he led Indianapolis to four wins and, in 2014, a trip to the AFC championship game. He was a four-time Pro Bowl selection and the 2018 NFL comeback player of the year.Luck’s football story, though, can’t be told without the injuries that ultimately led to his retirement in 2019.Physical toll on Andrew Luck through 6 NFL seasons:» Torn cartilage in 2 ribs» partially torn abdomen» a lacerated kidney that left him peeing blood» at least 1 concussion» a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder» and this mysterious calf/ankle issue that led to this— Zak Keefer (@zkeefer) August 25, 2019After Luck’s retirement became public, the level of shock that permeated throughout the NFL was on the level of the shock many felt when the likes of Barry Sanders, Jim Brown and Calvin Johnson retired. He had two years left on the five-year contract he signed in 2016, and there was little reason to believe he wouldn’t play out that deal with Indianapolis while earning himself another extension.MORE: Jim Irsay talks possible Luck returncenter_img MORE: Andrew Luck’s career by the numbersLuck, 29, retired after playing six NFL seasons in seven years. The No. 1 overall pick in the 2012 NFL Draft missed the entire 2017 season while recovering from a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder, and he did that after playing the entire 2016 season through pain.As it turns out, that 2016 season planted the seed for Luck’s premature retirement. After that year, Luck told himself he would never put himself in another situation that would jeopardize his long-term health — a situation he found himself managing over the summer.Luck was dealing with a mysterious ankle injury — “a myriad of issues,” as he says — that was not improving. He was stuck in a cycle of injury, pain and rehab, and he figured retirement was the only way out of that cycle.Here is Luck’s full explanation of his retirement:”This is not an easy decision. Honestly it’s the hardest decision of my life. But it is the right decision for me.”For the last four years or so I’ve been in this cycle of injury, pain, rehab; injury, pain, rehab. And it’s been unceasing and unrelenting both in-season and offseason. I felt stuck in it. The only way I see out is to no longer play football. It’s taken my joy of this game away.  I’ve been stuck in this process.”I haven’t been able to live the life I want to live. And after 2016 when I played in pain and was unable to really practice, I made a vow to myself that I would not go down that path again. I find myself in a similar situation. The only way forward for me is remove myself from football and this cycle that I’ve been in. I made a vow to myself that if I ever did again, I would choose me in this sense.”It’s very difficult. I love this team. I love my teammates, the folks in our building, the fans, the game of football. And as part of this team, and because of how I feel I know that I am unable to pour my heart and soul into this position. Which would not only sell myself short, but the team in the end, as well.”And its sad. But I also have a lot of clarity in this. It’s been a difficult process.”last_img read more