Handball Association Clarifies Pressing Issues

first_imgStarted at the campus of University of Liberia, the National Handball Association, NHA, has made a stride that many of his players, mostly students from the various schools are proud of. When Professor J. Mayson Saweler thought of the need to encourage the formation of the sport, he was aware of the challenges ahead.As a professor of physical education, Saweler realized that a healthy body is a happy person, and therefore he went ahead, with support from sports lovers to get the organization off the ground.“I proceeded nonetheless,” Saweler, who is also president of the Liberia National Handball Association, told the Daily Observer last Tuesday in Monrovia, “because I knew there was more that the sport can do for Liberian youths.”That was four years ago. Fast forward it to the year 2014 and after successful handling of the sport’s affairs, several schools in Monsterrado County, Grand Bassa, and Margibi County are part of it.“Liberia is not Monrovia,” Saweler said, “so we decided to take the sport to other counties.” And his administration is considering further expansion, after the successful defeat of the Ebola outbreak in the country. Regular leagues are organized and awareness about discipline has also been encouraged.In the organization’s first ever international assistance, Olympic Solidarity of the International Olympic Committee, through the Liberia National Olympic Committee, LNOC, provided sponsorship, along with a foreign expert that took participants through the sport’s fundamentals.“It was that support that moved our sport to another level,” Saweler said. He now pleads for more Liberian government’s support.He said, “We completed Ebola awareness for student athletes in Monrovia and we had hoped to extend it outside Montserrado County,” which could not continue due to lack of material support.Meanwhile, at the end of its successful leagues before the outbreak of the deadly Ebola disease, “We have six schools to award prizes at a convenient period,” he said.The schools, he said are Sarah Barclay in both male and female categories, (senior high); Melvin Sonnii (junior high) female division and Newport (male).“Slipway won both male and female versions in the elementary division,” he said.He said the six schools would receive a total amount of Ld30, 000.00, along with one set of jersey.One of the major setbacks for handball, he said, was the recent cancellation of both male and female teams to have participated in the Lome, Togo youth tournament.“Despite the disappointment,” Saweler said, “the grant of U$11,400.00 from the International Handball Federation is being spent for the development of handball, with the blessing of the International Handball Federation.”“It was good news for us,” he said. During the preparation for the abortive trip to Togo, the Ministry of Youth and Sports could not honor a budgeted U$16,000.00, since the ministry did not have money for the trip; a source told the Daily Observer.Among other activities, Saweler said his administration has purchased a vehicle for the organization to ease transportation difficulties. Needed support, he said was provided for three students, recently quarantined in West Point, and another is planned for three players in Dolo Town, in Margibi County who are also quarantined as a result of the fight of Ebola.Said head Coach Arthur N. Dormoh, “We are excited about the progress of handball so far because we can now travel to other counties and make deliveries of 100 handballs.”Coach Dormoh has been with handball from its formation. His colleague is (coach) Phillip Mansaray, who handles the male team.President Saweler meanwhile noted his appreciation to the LNOC for providing an office space for the association. “We have a contact point on By-Pass in Monrovia and we thank LNOC and its president Phillibert Browne for their support,” he said.He meanwhile expressed further appreciation to a foreign national who has been financially supportive to the development of handball in Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

HEART-BREAKING TRIBUTES TO TRAGIC SHAUN

first_imgFRIENDS and former colleagues of Burtonport man Shaun McBride, who died in a tragic work accident in Australia last weekend, have been posting heart-breaking tributes to him.The 28-year-old died when scaffolding he was working on at an industrial port in Dampier in Western Australia collapsed.Arrangements are being made to bring his remains home to Co Donegal. Fellow workers of Mr McBride are devastated by his death which is being investigated by safety officials in Australia.In one tribute on an Australian website, a friend says: “I worked with Shaun for a number of years – he was an absolute gent, and one of the nicest guys you could ever have the pleasure of being in the company of. He will be sorely missed. RIP Shaun.”Another wrote: “Absolute stand up fella, only knew Shaun for a few years but a hell of a nice guy, absolute legend. terrible news, condolences to the family.”And a Perth-based wife of one of Shaun’s colleagues wrote: “My partner works on this site too and it has been a sad few days for all the boys involved. RIP Shaun and Condolences to his family. such a sad and very unfortunate tragedy.” HEART-BREAKING TRIBUTES TO TRAGIC SHAUN was last modified: June 10th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:burtonportdampierrio tintoshaun mcbridelast_img read more

Ex-Cal star Gonzalez makes Hall of Fame, Flores and Lynch do not

first_imgTony Gonzalez, a former two-sport athlete from Cal who reinvented the position of tight end in the NFL, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Saturday in his first-year of eligibility.Gonzalez, who played 17 seasons for the Kansas City Chiefs and Atlanta Falcons, is the NFL’s all-time receiving leader among tight ends with 1,325 receptions, trailing only Jerry Rice (1,549) overall.Other selections included safety Ed Reed and cornerback Champ Bailey, also first-ballot selections, as …last_img

SA shines at World Press Photo

first_img17 February 2006Five South African photographers have walked away with top honours at this year’s World Press Photo awards, the most prestigious annual international competition in press photography.The five – Pieter Hugo, Shayne Robinson, Sydney Seshibedi, Joao Silva and Halden Krog – were up against 4 448 professional photographers from 122 countries, with a total of 83 044 images entered. Judging took place in Amsterdam in January and February 2006, with prizes awarded in 10 categories to 63 photographers of 25 nationalities.Hugo won first place in the portraits category, as did Robinson for arts and entertainment. Seshibedi and Silva both came second, in the sports action and contemporary issues categories respectively, and Krog won third place for nature photography.Founded in 1955, World Press Photo is an independent non-profit organisation based in the Netherlands. Its aim is to encourage high professional standards in photojournalism and to promote a free and unrestricted exchange of information.Pieter Hugo (Corbis)First prize, portrait singles: Mallam Gahadima Ahamadu with the hyena Jamis, Abuja, NigeriaPieter Hugo’s winning photo was taken during his 10-day journey with a group of travelling Nigerian minstrels and their entourage of animals: three hyenas, two pythons and four monkeys. The somewhat menacing image – produced for photo agency Corbis – shows the minstrel Mallam Gahadima Ahamadu with a muzzled hyena on a road in Abuja, Nigeria.Born in Johannesburg in 1976, Hugo’s work focuses on social issues with an emphasis on developing countries in Africa and elsewhere. He has worked for many print publications, including Adbusters, Colors, Dazed & Confused, the New Yorker and the London Sunday Times, producing visual essays on issues ranging from tuberculosis in Malawi to slavery in Sudan, slums in Brazil to old age communities in South Africa.In 2002/3 he participated in a residency at Fabrica, Benetton’s Research and Communications Centre in Italy. His work has been exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Cape Town’s Michael Stevenson Contemporary, the Museum of Modern Art in Rome, and Lisbon’s Fabrica Features. Pieter Hugo websiteCorbis websiteShayne Robinson (PhotoWire Africa, Globe and Mail) First prize, arts and entertainment singles: Ballet class, Alexandra TownshipA relative newcomer to professional photography, Shayne Robinson nonetheless managed to win first place in the single photo category for arts and entertainment. The image, of a ballet class in Johannesburg’s impoverished Alexandra township, was produced for PhotoWire Africa and published in Canada’s Globe and Mail.Previously the editor of online IT publication ICT World, Robinson decided to try his hand at professional photography after reading The Bang Bang Club, the story of a group of veteran photographers who chronicled the violent dying days of apartheid – which is co-authored by Joao Silva, another World Press 2006 winner.“With no formal qualifications or any photographic knowledge,” Robinson says, “I managed to somehow find my way into the South African Press Association.” He credits his success to the mentoring he received from experienced South African photographers Kim Ludbrook, Halden Krog – yet another World Press winner – and Jon Hrusa.Shayne Robinson websitePhotoWire Africa websiteGlobe and Mail websiteSydney Seshibedi (Sunday Times)Second prize, sports action singles: Sidney Maluleke fights with Sello Hawong in JohannesburgYoung Sunday Times photographer Sydney Seshibedi, Premier Soccer League photographer of the year for 2004, won second prize in the single sports action category for a remarkable boxing photo. The image shows South African featherweight boxer Sidney Maluleke, left, taking a blow from super featherweight Sello Hanong Hawong at Nasrec in Johannesburg in September 2005.Seshibedi is a prolific photographer, with his work for the Sunday Times taking him from Mozambique, to photograph former President Joaquim Chissano, to war-torn Sudan to document life in refugee camps.Sunday Times websiteJoao Silva (New York Times) Second prize, contemporary issues singles:Malawi prisonOne of South Africa’s most respected photographers, Joao Silva was a member of the elite Bang Bang Club, a group of what were essentially war photographers who – at great personal risk – documented township violence during the last days of apartheid in the late 1980s.Although the membership of this club sometimes changed, there were four consistent members: Silva, Greg Marinovich, Kevin Carter and Ken Oosterbroek. Two of them lost their lives in events directly or indirectly related to their work. Oosterbroek was killed in bloody fighting in Thokoza township just days before South Africa’s first democratic election, and Carter committed suicide months after winning the Pulitzer Prize for a haunting Sudan famine picture.Born in Portugal in 1966, Silva is a photographer contracted to the New York Times and lives in Johannesburg. He has travelled widely in Africa, the Balkans, Central Asia, Russia and the Middle East. His photograph of grossly overcrowded conditions in a Malawi prison won him second place for single photos of contemporary issues in this year’s World Press.He has produced two books: The Bang-Bang Club with Greg Marinovich, and In the Company of God, which portrays Iraqi Shi’a Muslims in a period of occupation and transition.Joao Silva websiteNew York Times websiteHalden Krog (Beeld)Third prize, nature singles: Stranded fishing boat after tsunami, Banda Aceh, Indonesia, January 2005The chief photographer at Afrikaans daily newspaper Beeld, Halden Krog has twice claimed the MTN Fujifilm Photographer of the Year award. His remarkable image of a fishing boat lying incongruously on green croplands earned him third prize in the nature category at the World Press awards.“Krog’s success has a lot to do with his artistic eye for composition, his technical advancement and people skills,” says Dawid Roux, Beeld’s picture editor. “His intolerance for mediocrity can sometimes drive his colleagues insane, but by the same token, they have the utmost respect for it.”Krog has also mentored another World Press winner, Shayne Robinson.Beeld websiteSee all the winners on the World Press Photo website.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

DDGS exports to Mexico creating new market opportunities

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Selling 50 metric tons of U.S. distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) may seem minor, but Javier Chávez, U.S. Grains Council (USGC) Mexico marketing specialist, views these small sales to cattle and dairy producers in southeastern Mexico as the start of another big opportunity for U.S. feed grains.DDGS is a well-known and frequently-used feed source in northern Mexico but does not benefit from the same recognition in the southeastern region of the country. Instead, both cattle and dairy operations rely on grazing pasture to feed the region’s estimated seven million cattle.Chávez explained this substantial market is largely undeveloped due to a lack of knowledge of superior feeding practices and inefficient distribution of feed ingredients. There, available forage provides inadequate nutrition, resulting in poor body condition scores, insufficient daily weight increases, late pregnancies and very large calving intervals.USGC identified the need in this area for higher-quality feed and an opportunity to create demand for U.S. DDGS. The Council started conducting DDGS feeding trials in 2015, in coordination with consultants, for calves, heifers and dairy cattle in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The combination of the good taste, superior nutritional value and high digestibility of U.S. DDGS resulted in increased milk production, better body condition scores and improved fertility. For example, heifers fed U.S. DDGS could be bred to give birth at around two years of age, compared to the regional norm of three or four years.“The improved fertility means one more calf and one more lactation in the life of a cow, which means a lot of extra money for the producer,” Chávez said. “Supplementing with DDGS means a tremendous savings of time and an increase in the profitability of the ranch.”The Council presented the DDGS feeding trial results in a series of on-farm presentations. However, Chávez said he realized the Council needed to expand its work to suppliers because DDGS were not used in the region previously, and producers did not have existing relationships to make purchases following positive trial results.“The main problem we had was that we presented the result, and producers were happy and convinced that they can be more efficient through supplementation with DDGS,” Chávez said. “Now, we are developing both ends of the market — end-users and suppliers.”As a result, this year’s presentations now include a DDGS distributor. Doing so at the most recent presentation in Chiapas resulted in 50 metric tons of sales on the day of and following the presentation. That small success is one the Council believes will continue to expand following additional DDGS feeding trials underway in Yucatan, Tabasco and Veracruz.This win-win scenario for U.S. farmers and Mexican producers is built on a strong trading relationship that benefits from advantageous trade policy and robust market development. The trading preferences in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have incentivized the integration of logistics on both sides of the border, and the Council’s work in Mexico over the past 30 years has helped expand the use of U.S. grain products throughout the country.“NAFTA helped us have U.S. DDGS available and accessible in this area,” Chávez said. “Without the trade agreement, it would be harder, and more expensive, to get U.S. DDGS to this market with fewer suppliers willing to sell it.”last_img read more