Executive Mansion Reporters Want Finance Minister to: ‘Talk to the President for Us’

first_imgAs the term of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf elapses, the group of journalists covering the President, under the banner “Executive Mansion Press Team” on February 20, 2017 cried on the Minister of Finance Boima Kamara to talk on their behalf to get some benefit from the president, before she leaves office.In what appeared like a press conference with the Minister, later turned into private discussion with Minister Boima at the Jackie’s Guest House in Ganta, the journalists complained that they have covered the president a lot, but yet to get the require benefits to boast of tomorrow.Samukai Dukuly of Power TV said for too long we have been covering the president, but we are yet to benefit anything tangible as reporters assigned to the president.“As young men like us, well respected personalities in the government, we want you to intervene and talk to the President so she can think about us,” he said.Varney Kamara of New Democrat Newspaper said, “We have been covering the president for the past 12 years, but we have nothing to boast of as reporters covering Executive Mansion.”They talked about not being allowed or being given the opportunity to travel with the president on some of her trips abroad. The rest of the reporters at the conference, buttressed their colleagues’ statements, calling for Minister Kamara to intervene to get just benefit from their respective duties as reporters assigned to cover the president.In response, Minister Kamara told them to forward their requests to the Minister of State, Hon. Sylvester Grisgbe, who is the proper authority that could address their concerns.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

The Man Utd vs QPR quiz

first_imgToday QPR play at Old Trafford – the scene of one of their greatest victories, along with plenty of defeats. How much do you know about the history between Rangers and Manchester United? Answer these 10 questions to find out…[mtouchquiz 4]Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Liverpool boss hails ‘peerless’ Gerrard

first_imgLiverpool manager Brendan Rodgers paid tribute to Steven Gerrard after the midfielder’s last-minute penalty gave the Reds a dramatic 3-2 victory at Fulham.The Whites led twice but stayed bottom of the Premier League after Gerrard fired home from the spot following Sascha Riether’s foul on Daniel Sturridge.And Rodgers declared: “Steven Gerrard is peerless in situations like that. He showed brilliant composure. It was a great result. We’ve had to show character to come from behind twice – a brilliant victory.“We raised the intensity and aggression at half-time. We’re disappointed with the second goal we gave away but this team has shown great characteristics mentally.“We conceded two goals – that has been unlike us for a while. We need to eradicate the individual errors. Thankfully we have goals in the team.”More reaction from Craven Cottage to follow.See also:Fulham beaten by Gerrard’s late penaltyRodgers laughs off Mourinho’s ‘little horse’ remark as Liverpool close on ChelseaFulham v Liverpool player ratingsFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Giants-Rockies preview: Williamson reportedly set to return after another hot streak

first_imgDENVER — At the end of a long and challenging spring training, Giants president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi elected to designate outfielder Mac Williamson for assignment.The decision marked the probable end of the road for Williamson in the Giants’ organization, as the 2012 third round draft pick was placed on waivers and available to be claimed by 29 other clubs.Each franchise passed on the opportunity.Six weeks later, Williamson is set to rejoin the Giants as Alex Pavlovic of NBC …last_img

SA shines at World Press Photo

first_img17 February 2006Five South African photographers have walked away with top honours at this year’s World Press Photo awards, the most prestigious annual international competition in press photography.The five – Pieter Hugo, Shayne Robinson, Sydney Seshibedi, Joao Silva and Halden Krog – were up against 4 448 professional photographers from 122 countries, with a total of 83 044 images entered. Judging took place in Amsterdam in January and February 2006, with prizes awarded in 10 categories to 63 photographers of 25 nationalities.Hugo won first place in the portraits category, as did Robinson for arts and entertainment. Seshibedi and Silva both came second, in the sports action and contemporary issues categories respectively, and Krog won third place for nature photography.Founded in 1955, World Press Photo is an independent non-profit organisation based in the Netherlands. Its aim is to encourage high professional standards in photojournalism and to promote a free and unrestricted exchange of information.Pieter Hugo (Corbis)First prize, portrait singles: Mallam Gahadima Ahamadu with the hyena Jamis, Abuja, NigeriaPieter Hugo’s winning photo was taken during his 10-day journey with a group of travelling Nigerian minstrels and their entourage of animals: three hyenas, two pythons and four monkeys. The somewhat menacing image – produced for photo agency Corbis – shows the minstrel Mallam Gahadima Ahamadu with a muzzled hyena on a road in Abuja, Nigeria.Born in Johannesburg in 1976, Hugo’s work focuses on social issues with an emphasis on developing countries in Africa and elsewhere. He has worked for many print publications, including Adbusters, Colors, Dazed & Confused, the New Yorker and the London Sunday Times, producing visual essays on issues ranging from tuberculosis in Malawi to slavery in Sudan, slums in Brazil to old age communities in South Africa.In 2002/3 he participated in a residency at Fabrica, Benetton’s Research and Communications Centre in Italy. His work has been exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Cape Town’s Michael Stevenson Contemporary, the Museum of Modern Art in Rome, and Lisbon’s Fabrica Features. Pieter Hugo websiteCorbis websiteShayne Robinson (PhotoWire Africa, Globe and Mail) First prize, arts and entertainment singles: Ballet class, Alexandra TownshipA relative newcomer to professional photography, Shayne Robinson nonetheless managed to win first place in the single photo category for arts and entertainment. The image, of a ballet class in Johannesburg’s impoverished Alexandra township, was produced for PhotoWire Africa and published in Canada’s Globe and Mail.Previously the editor of online IT publication ICT World, Robinson decided to try his hand at professional photography after reading The Bang Bang Club, the story of a group of veteran photographers who chronicled the violent dying days of apartheid – which is co-authored by Joao Silva, another World Press 2006 winner.“With no formal qualifications or any photographic knowledge,” Robinson says, “I managed to somehow find my way into the South African Press Association.” He credits his success to the mentoring he received from experienced South African photographers Kim Ludbrook, Halden Krog – yet another World Press winner – and Jon Hrusa.Shayne Robinson websitePhotoWire Africa websiteGlobe and Mail websiteSydney Seshibedi (Sunday Times)Second prize, sports action singles: Sidney Maluleke fights with Sello Hawong in JohannesburgYoung Sunday Times photographer Sydney Seshibedi, Premier Soccer League photographer of the year for 2004, won second prize in the single sports action category for a remarkable boxing photo. The image shows South African featherweight boxer Sidney Maluleke, left, taking a blow from super featherweight Sello Hanong Hawong at Nasrec in Johannesburg in September 2005.Seshibedi is a prolific photographer, with his work for the Sunday Times taking him from Mozambique, to photograph former President Joaquim Chissano, to war-torn Sudan to document life in refugee camps.Sunday Times websiteJoao Silva (New York Times) Second prize, contemporary issues singles:Malawi prisonOne of South Africa’s most respected photographers, Joao Silva was a member of the elite Bang Bang Club, a group of what were essentially war photographers who – at great personal risk – documented township violence during the last days of apartheid in the late 1980s.Although the membership of this club sometimes changed, there were four consistent members: Silva, Greg Marinovich, Kevin Carter and Ken Oosterbroek. Two of them lost their lives in events directly or indirectly related to their work. Oosterbroek was killed in bloody fighting in Thokoza township just days before South Africa’s first democratic election, and Carter committed suicide months after winning the Pulitzer Prize for a haunting Sudan famine picture.Born in Portugal in 1966, Silva is a photographer contracted to the New York Times and lives in Johannesburg. He has travelled widely in Africa, the Balkans, Central Asia, Russia and the Middle East. His photograph of grossly overcrowded conditions in a Malawi prison won him second place for single photos of contemporary issues in this year’s World Press.He has produced two books: The Bang-Bang Club with Greg Marinovich, and In the Company of God, which portrays Iraqi Shi’a Muslims in a period of occupation and transition.Joao Silva websiteNew York Times websiteHalden Krog (Beeld)Third prize, nature singles: Stranded fishing boat after tsunami, Banda Aceh, Indonesia, January 2005The chief photographer at Afrikaans daily newspaper Beeld, Halden Krog has twice claimed the MTN Fujifilm Photographer of the Year award. His remarkable image of a fishing boat lying incongruously on green croplands earned him third prize in the nature category at the World Press awards.“Krog’s success has a lot to do with his artistic eye for composition, his technical advancement and people skills,” says Dawid Roux, Beeld’s picture editor. “His intolerance for mediocrity can sometimes drive his colleagues insane, but by the same token, they have the utmost respect for it.”Krog has also mentored another World Press winner, Shayne Robinson.Beeld websiteSee all the winners on the World Press Photo website.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Legal with Leah: CAUV Update

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentNew, lower CAUV valuations will be applied this year in 24 Ohio counties. Farm Bureau Policy Counsel Leah Curtis talks about what this means and how it came to be.Listen to Legal with Leah, a podcast featuring Ohio Farm Bureau’s Policy Counsel Leah Curtis discussing topics impacting farmers and landowners.  Leave a Commentlast_img

More Nicks in Net Neutrality’s Death By A Thousand Cuts

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Tags:#Analysis#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img This week, at long last, the Federal Communications Commission explained in court why telco criticisms of its Net neutrality regulations are “baseless.” Nonetheless, it has become crystal clear that the FCC’s rules against online discrimination – perhaps the signature technology policy move of Barack Obama’s presidency – are in the industry’s crosshairs.The Net neutrality regulations adopted by the FCC on a party-line vote just before Christmas 2010 represented the administration’s attempt to find middle ground. Chairman Julius Genachowski had floated an idea variously called “The Third Way” or “Title II Lite.” His plan proposed a historic, black-and-white reclassification of broadband Internet service as a telecommunications service under the Communications Act of 1934, but with caveats: the FCC would “forebear” on using all the regulatory muscle that it generally holds over common carriers, like the ability to impose sharing requirements. But Genachowski, facing a tsunami of industry disapproval, retreated to a far more modest jurisdiction over broadband. That’s what Verizon now dismisses in court as the FCC’s attempt to “conjure a role for itself.”Genachowski’s Net neutrality rules were a tenuous play from the start, considering the Comcast v. FCC decision on BitTorrent throttling some months earlier, which challenged the commission’s “ancillary authority” to regulate broadband. Verizon said it would go to court. It has.Meanwhile, AT&T responded in public with a what’s done is done air. In a hearing last March, a company executive quietly seconded a member of Congress who suggested the rules would “require no change in the business plans of AT&T.” We’re beginning to see why. In the run up to this week’s expected release of iOS 6, AT&T has said that it will disable FaceTime, the iPhone’s video chat feature, over its cellular networks except for subscribers to its pricey Mobile Share plans. Why? An uncertainty about data load, the company said. And if the FCC can make up the rules as it goes along, AT&T seems to be arguing, then so can we.Blocking FaceTime doesn’t violate Net neutrality regs, a company rep wrote, because the app is “preloaded.” That’s a distinction not found within the four corners of the FCC’s neutrality rules. But it buys the company a little wiggle room.Genachowski’s Christmas surprise earned him the ire of critics, some of whom see an inevitability to today’s challenges. “This is a mess of the commission’s own making,” said Derek Turner, research director of Free Press, a vociferous proponent of net neutrality regulations. Congress, it’s worth noting, wasn’t able to craft the FCC any clearer authority. But rather than establishing that the Internet is both the digital bits that make up its content and the (highly regulable) pipes that those bits travel along, Genachowski tried to make do with a far less coherent jurisdiction. And prodded by industry, he carved out exemptions for mobile Internet, which is exactly how more and more Americans are going online. Companies can’t block competitive applications, and they have to be transparent about what they do do. But that leaves gaps big enough for AT&T to drive its FaceTime policy through.That the FCC would claim jurisdiction over broadband, today’s dominant communications medium, scares the bejeebus out of some people. Same goes for the idea that it wouldn’t. The agency tried to calm roiling waters with a tempered approach to Net neutrality. But that produced only a momentary peace. Verizon is challenging it in court. AT&T is challenging it in the marketplace. What is the government’s role in regulating broadband networks? More unsettled than ever. And that doesn’t benefit much of anyone. nancy scola A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

DaVinci Resolve: THE Total Guide to the Best Free Video Editor

first_imgFind out everything you need to get started in DaVinci Resolve with this complete, six-part video guide to the best free video editor on the market.I don’t know about you, but I haven’t had a chance to master DaVinci Resolve yet. There are a lot of small details and techniques about Resolve that I’ve picked up from various videos over the years, but I haven’t been able to just sit down and take the time to learn the thing.DaVinci Resolve has always amazed me — what was once the industry-leading color grading software that only a small group of filmmaking professionals could use (or afford) became the industry’s best free editing software, and it is still the industry-leading color correction software.Image via Blackmagic Design.Yes, that’s right, DaVinci Resolve is a completely free download, and if you don’t have a copy of it on your machine, click here: DaVinci Resolve Download. (You’ll find the download link at the bottom of the page).It can be daunting to learn an entirely new NLE. Luckily, Lewis McGregor has our backs. Lewis is a certified Blackmagic trainer. So, just for you, he made a six-part video series that teaches you everything you need to know to get started. After you watch this series, you’ll be using the industry-standard color correction and editing software in no time.How to Organize and Import Media In ResolveOne of the first snags I always hit when I hop into Resolve is that I don’t really know the right way to get my media organized and into a bin. I’m so very used to the Premiere workflows — and previously Final Cut, from way back, which was relatively similar.Resolve is a bit different, but as McGregor shows us in this first episode, it’s not as different as it might initially seem. Creating a project and getting all of your media is very straightforward. There is a lot you can do with metadata and proxies, but it can also be simpler than that. It just depends on how you intend to use the software.After this video, I felt empowered to hop into Resolve and get started immediately.How to Use The Edit Page In ResolveAs someone who previously only used Resolve for color correcting a completed edit, I always had a little bit of trouble navigating the Edit Page.In this episode, Lewis explains everything about the Edit Page from a layout standpoint — and how to get everything in an interface that makes sense to you. He also covers the various parts of the page and what their purposes are.How to Edit Your Video In DaVinci ResolveNow we’re getting down to the nitty gritty. In this episode, we learn about the various tools for editing and fine-tuning directly on the timeline.In Resolve, it’s easy to find all of your favorite editing tools — trim tools, roll edit, ripple edit, slip edit, slide edit, and (of course) markers and flags.Once you get comfortable with the selection methods and the various edits, you’re pretty much on your way to doing everything you need editing-wise in Resolve.How to Edit Audio In DaVinci ResolveAudio is always one of the first reasons I don’t switch NLEs. Editing and controlling audio is a very nuanced process, and I feel like it’s one of the hardest things for an editor to master. You get used to doing it a specific way, and you start getting good results with your program of choice.In this episode, Lewis shows us how to edit audio in Resolve easily and effectively. As you’ll learn, Resolve actually offers one of the best sets of audio editing features of any NLE — the Fairlight audio page.After watching this video, you’ll be able to find all of the audio tools you need in Resolve — like the track mixer, EQ settings, pan mixer, etc.How to Render or Export In DaVinci ResolveNow that your edit is done, you need to know how to export it.In this episode, Lewis walks us through the Delivery Page. This is where you’ll find all of your rendering options. Resolve has included handy presets for various social platforms (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), which stay up to date with the respective platform’s suggestions.Aside from that, the render settings and options are exactly what you’re used to in any other editing software.How to Set Up Basic User Settings In DaVinci ResolveResolve gives you a lot of control when it comes to GPU usage and memory settings. There are also a lot of settings for playback and audio input and output. As you are probably used to with other editors you’ve used, these settings are all among the basic user settings.In this episode, Lewis covers all of these various settings. This way, you can put everything you’ve learned to good use — with all of the right settings for your machine.How to Color Correct and Color Grade in DaVinci ResolveAs an added bonus, we didn’t forget the thing we all know DaVinci Resolve for the most — color grading! In this video tutorial from RocketStock, Lewis shows us the ropes with the color side of Resolve. Check it out!Looking for even more information on DaVinci Resolve? Check out these articles and tutorials.Using the Track Select Forward Tool in DaVinci Resolve 15Color Grading Tips: The Ins and Outs of Correcting for a Pink SkyColor Grading: Working with the Hue vs. Curves in DaVinci ResolveRevive Your Footage With Resolve 15’s Automatic Dirt Repair and Dust Buster ToolsHow to Use the Shared Node Feature in DaVinci ResolveQuick Tip: How To Use Optimized Media In DaVinci ResolveRemove Unwanted Shot Features With Resolve 15’s Patch ReplacerGet To Know DaVinci Resolve 15’s Super Scale FeatureYour Guide to Working with Project Files in DaVinci Resolvelast_img read more