‘That was no draw’, says Walters after boxing decision

first_img“I clearly won the fight; that was no draw. I am shocked by this decision,” were the words of a disappointed Nicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters yesterday, when asked to comment on the majority draw decision of the judges in his fight against Jason Sosa, at the Turning Stone Resort in Verona, New York, on Saturday night.In what has been declared by journalists who watched the fight at ringside as ‘the worst scored fight of 2015’, one judge, Tom Schreck, had Sosa the winner 96-94, while the other judges, Wynn Kintz and Don Ackerman, had it 95-95. The Gleaner scored the fight 97-93 for Walters, and as another point of reference, experienced HBO scorer and former international boxing judge, Harold Lederman, scored it 99-91 for Walters.It was a hard-fought and entertaining fight, with Walters, (26-0), fighting as a super featherweight (130 lb) for the first time. Having lost his featherweight title in June on the scale, when he weighed in a pound over the featherweight limit of 126 lb, Walters was using this fight as a benchmark to see how he would perform at the higher weight class.On this occasion, he fought a bigger man in the person of Sosa, who entered the ring with a 18-1-3 record, but he held his own in a fight that was mostly at close range, and his vicious body attacks clearly bothered his opponent. If one could find fault with his work during the 10 bruising rounds, it would be that he did not use his jabs enough.Whenever Walters went on the outside, he looked far superior than his opponent, and it was surprising that his trainers, Celso Ch·vez and Job Walters, did not tell him at any time in the fight to use his jabs more.The impression given was that they wanted to prove a point. They wanted it to be seen that Walters could outslug a bigger opponent.This tactic nearly backfired, however, as the judges clearly did not give Walters full credit for the good, clean punches to the body that he landed repeatedly. Walters was clearly the better fighter, and in the fifth round, he shook Sosa with a left hook to the body and right cross to the head combination.Surprisingly, he did not follow through and Sosa weathered the storm.BEST ROUNDSWalters gained the ascendancy as the fight progressed, and in the eighth round, he seemed as if he was trying to end it. This was one of his best rounds.Ironically, Sosa came out aggressively for the ninth, which was perhaps his best round.Walters came back firing on all cylinders in the final round, using jabs and hooks to good advantage, and it seemed a mere formality when the fight ended that it would be the Jamaican raising his hands in victory for the 27th time. That was not to be, however, as he had to share the spoils.He told The Gleaner that he will be taking a break for Christmas and the New Year and will be in Jamaica for a holiday soon.”I am coming home for a short holiday, after which I will sit down with my team and decide what we will do in 2016,” said Walters.last_img read more

Comet samples shock to scientists

first_imgSPACE CENTER, Houston – NASA scientists have a new mystery to solve: How did materials formed by fire end up on the outermost reaches of the solar system, where temperatures are the coldest? The materials were contained in dust samples captured when the robotic Stardust spacecraft flew past the comet Wild 2 in 2004. A 100-pound capsule tied to a parachute returned the samples to Earth in January. The Stardust mission is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. The samples include minerals such as anorthite, which is made up of calcium, sodium, aluminum and silicate; and diopside, made of calcium magnesium and silicate. Such minerals only form in very high temperatures. He said it is also possible that the comet particles could have been formed in another solar system and catapulted into our solar system. To determine where the particles originated, scientists are now studying their isotopic makeup. About 150 scientists worldwide have been studying the dust since it arrived. During the $212 million mission, the Stardust spacecraft looped around the sun three times to capture the interstellar and comet dust. The comet dust was captured in a silicone-based material contained in a tennis racket-size collector mitt. The mother ship, which has traveled nearly 3 billion miles, remains in permanent orbit around the sun. The next time it flies by Earth will be in January 2009. Don Brownlee, a University of Washington astronomer who is the mission’s principal scientist, said that in a few weeks or months he and his colleagues hope to know more. “It depends on whether the isotopic composition indicates these grains are from our solar system or from another star,” he said. “It’s a real exciting mystery story. So stay tuned.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant “That’s a big surprise. People thought comets would just be cold stuff that formed out … where things are very cold,” said NASA curator Michael Zolensky. “It was kind of a shock to not just find one but several of these, which implies they are pretty common in the comet.” The discovery raises questions about where the materials in comets form, he added. One theory is that particles from the outer reaches of the solar system slowly move toward the sun, where they are set ablaze and shot back out. A scientific model once suggested that might be a natural occurrence, but it wasn’t accepted because materials tend to cluster in zones the farther they are from the sun, Zolensky said. If the model were true, materials would mix more, the NASA scientist said. “It raises a question of why we still see zoning in the asteroid belt. It is a big mystery now,” Zolensky said. “It’s kind of really exciting.” last_img read more