People on the Move 090910

first_imgBrandon Holley is returning to print magazines. After a stint as editor-in-chief and business lead of Yahoo! Shine, Condé Nast has named her editor-in-Chief of Lucky magazine, replacing Kim France. From 2005 to 2007 Holley served as editor-in-chief of Condé Nast’s Jane, and launched ELLEgirl in 2001.Several editorial hires have been made at O, the Oprah Magazine: Lauren Kern was appointed executive editor, Michelle Shih was named director of digital editions and lifestyle, Raha Naddaf was named senior editor and Adam Bell was appointed managing editor.Hearst announced a pair of personnel changes at the U.S. edition of Marie Claire: Alison Edmond was named fashion editor-at-large and Elise Nersesian-Solé as articles editor. Harper’s Bazaar appointed Brian Garnock associate publisher of advertising. Most recently, Garnock served as vice president of advertising at the New York Times.Meredith’s Fitness announced the addition of three new editors: Lisa Haney was named senior fitness editor, Jenna Autouri was appointed fitness editor, and April Franzino was named associated beauty editor.Advanstar Communications appointed Steve Sturm chief marketing officer. Sturm previously served as group vice president of Americas Strategic Research and Planning.Fader Media named Thomas Kay creative director. Previously, Kay headed New York magazine’s Intelligencer section.Brian Hoffman was named executive vice president and chief creative officer of Hoffman Media. Most recently he served as the company’s vice president of brand management.Niche Media founder and CEO Jason Binn was appointed chief advisor to Kevin Ryan, chairman of online fashion and travel retailer the Gilt Groupe. In this role, Binn will lend support to the company’s “continued efforts to nurture and develop relationships with the world’s most prestigious brands.”Financial services publisher SourceMedia named Jim Moore managing director of research and data, heading the company’s new syndicated research and data business. Previously, Moore served as chairman and CEO of Highline Financial.Amy DiTullio was named site director at HarpersBazaar.com. Most recently, DiTullio served as online managing editor at Women’s Wear Daily.Hearst’s Redbook announced a number of additions to its editorial team: Jennifer Tung was named deputy editor, Katherine Van Itallie was named art director, Jihan Thompson was appointed articles editor and Erin Hobday was named health director.last_img read more

Amy Chhabra switches from designing houses to set her fashion label

first_imgAmy ChhabraPR HandoutSocial media is indeed a powerful tool in 21st century that can make someone a star over night. Amy Chhabra, a young architect by profession but a true fashionista and travel enthusiast by heart, switched her profession from designing houses to fulfilling her hobby and interest in the fashion industry. She has represented various National Level Collaborations and worked with some of the famous Tourism boards.She is currently in the pre-production stage of starting her own fashion label. And she is also keen on writing a book. The young social media sensation says, “I have always had my bent towards fashion and clothes. Being an architect didn’t give me that kick and hence, I opted to do what I love. After being a social media influencer and having worked with brands like Google, Amazon, Oppo, Loreal and Tata to name a few, I am currently in the planning process of my own fashion label. It will be a blend of trend and the pop culture.”Holding a Post Graduate Degree from Scotland, the free spirited and ambitious in nature girl, gives her followers some major wanderlust goals with her pictures on her blog and Instagram. She also aims to empower and Inspire a lot of young women.last_img read more

Audit Prompts Changes To Help Houston Fire Departments Building Inspectors

first_imgThe Houston Controller last week released an audit of the Houston Fire Department’s Life Safety Bureau, which inspects buildings. City Controller Chris Brown told “Houston Matters” that, as an example, only 526 of Houston’s more than 5,000 apartment buildings were inspected in the last two years — well below the bureau’s goal of 470 apartment inspections per month.“It could have been that they have inspected more of these units. They don’t have records that are accurately reflecting that they had, in fact. There were records that were found on older databases, in logs and even in notepads in the various inspectors’ desks.”New Fire Chief Samuel Pena is already implementing changes, and says he wants to improve the bureau’s database.“We’re not able to share information between departments to refine our risk-based approach. If the Department of Health has cited a particular company because their range hood extinguishing system is clogged with grease, that’s important for us because that could present a fire hazard.”Pena says a consultant is helping develop a risk-based inspection program. It would prioritize buildings that need more frequent inspections, such as petroleum or chemical companies, schools and day cares and so on. X 00:00 /01:15 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Sharelast_img read more

The Hour of Power

first_imgBy Joi Thomas, Special to the AFROThere’s nothing quite like the sound of a gospel choir.  Sunday morning church service would not be the same without their presence; we love to hear and watch them sing.  Even the choir director plays an important role in making sure a joyful noise is made unto the Lord.  If you enjoy choir music, then mark your calendar for The Hour of Power, held every second Sunday of the month.Elder Eric WaddellHosted by Elder Eric Waddell, each month one of his choirs sings for an hour, and takes the congregation back in time by singing gospel classics from years past.Waddell, a gospel recording artist, is the minister of music at Mt. Pigsah CME Church in West Baltimore, and the founder and director of the Abundant Life Singers, the Baltimore Sanctuary Choir and The Voices of the Hour of Power.Sunday March 11th, the Hour of Power, was held at Brown’s Memorial Baptist Church.  The Abundant Life Singers, The Baltimore Sanctuary Choir and The Voices of the Hour of Power all sang to the glory of God.  This particular Hour of Power was special because the theme was family and friends.  I asked Mr. Waddell about the significance of this and he stated, “Every year the Baltimore gospel community celebrates the importance of worshipping together.  We celebrate family through Gospel Music,” Waddell said.  If you have ever been to an Hour of Power, then you know as soon as the music begins, it feels like one big family reunion.  Everyone begins to sing and reminisce about days ago.  The spirit of God is always felt, and you leave feeling like you have gotten the extra boost that you need to make it through the week.The Hour of Power is such a unique concept.  I was interested in what prompted Waddell to begin this movement in Baltimore.  He informed me that it’s more than just singing for an hour.  “I wanted a platform to educate and showcase the history of choir music,” he said. “The Hour of Power is a city-wide effort as we preserve songs from the past and celebrate where Gospel Music is headed.  The vision is to motivate our church choirs to stay alive, teach younger musicians the hymns of the church and unify our city in singing the good news.”Next month, April 8, The Hour of Power will celebrate five years.  Plans are still underway, but be sure this will be an event you don’t want to miss.  Check back next time to see all the details for the five year anniversary of The Hour of Power.last_img read more

Selfticking oscillator could be next for portable atomic clocks

first_img“Most conventional atomic clocks need a more conventional, non-atomic clock, like a quartz crystal, to keep them ticking,” William Happer tells PhysOrg.com. “We’ve developed a system that would be self-ticking, using a specific laser.” Redefining the limits of measurement accuracy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “It’s really a souped-up mode-locked laser,” Happer says. “While our laser has much in common with a mode-locked laser, there are some differences. The atoms in the vapor cell notice if the frequency of the mode-locked laser drifts and they automatically correct the frequency with no need for any external feedback loops.”Happer continues: “An important benefit of push-pull pumping with alternating circular polarization is that none of the atoms are wasted.” “In most atomic clocks,” Jau adds, “many of the atoms are wasted. Only a very few are in the clock state. With this push-pull pumping, all of the atoms are put into a clock state.”Along the way, the two discovered something interesting. “The self-modulation occurs over a limited range of laser injection current. We weren’t surprised that too little current didn’t work. What surprised us was that too much current caused the laser to stop modulating,” Happer says. Jau continues: “This new oscillator, where the polarized atoms, the modulated photons, and the laser gain centers are all coupled together has very rich and interesting physics. ”Happer does point out that these oscillators could not replace the extremely precise, but large atomic clocks that occupy whole rooms. “It’s really to improve the workings of small, portable atomic clocks,” he emphasizes. “It eliminates the need for quartz crystals or photodetectors. Hopefully, with fewer parts, it will be less expensive to manufacture, and more stable.”Jau agrees: “This is a primitive idea, how to make an atomic clock by using pure optical methods without a quartz crystal. But it works better with reduced components and power consumption.”Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Self-ticking oscillator could be next for portable atomic clocks (2007, December 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-12-self-ticking-oscillator-portable-atomic-clocks.html Happer is a scientist at Princeton University. He, along with his young colleague Yuan-Yu Jau, invented a push-pull laser-atomic oscillator that can be useful in a variety of applications, including questions of fundamental physics, use in portable atomic clocks and coherent optical combs. “We didn’t start out thinking about applications, really,” Happer says. “We’re physicists. We just wanted to see if we could make this type of oscillator work.” The results of Happer and Jau’s work can be found in Physical Review Letters: “Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator.”Jau explains that even though they didn’t set out to build a better portable atomic clock, he thinks that they have succeeded. “We believe this is the first demonstration of making an oscillator that produces an atomic-clock signal in both electrical and optical forms by purely optical means,” he says. “This is simple. There are fewer components and lower power consumption.”“The new clock needs neither a quartz crystal with its electronics nor a photodetector,” Happer adds.Jau and Happer explain that in conventional atomic clocks, a quartz crystal is used “as a flywheel to keep the clock ticking strongly, with the atoms as a weak controlling element.” They point out that if the quartz crystal fails, the clock will cease working. “These are the types of clocks used in GPS satellites and in cell-phone towers,” Happer says.Jau points out that better precision is becoming increasingly necessary: “Mini atomic clocks can be helpful. There are many systems now working faster and faster, and transmitting large quantities of data, especially in high-speed communications. A laser atomic clock like this would be less complicated than the conventional kind, with comparable precision.”The push-pull laser-atomic oscillator built by the two consists of a semiconductor laser with alkali-metal vapor (in this case Potassium) in the external cavity. A time independent current is used to pump the semiconductor laser. “The laser will automatically modulate its light and its electrical impedance at the clock frequency of the atoms,” Happer says. This in turn eliminates the need for an external modulator, like the quartz crystal, or for a photodetector. Explore furtherlast_img read more

MIT groups shape display steps to new realm in interaction future w

first_img TED SpaceTop presenter is redefining hands-on computing (w/ video) Citation: MIT group’s shape display steps to new realm in interaction future (w/ Video) (2013, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-mit-group-realm-interaction-future.html Their paper, “inFORM: Dynamic Physical Affordances and Constraints through Shape and Object Actuation,” by Sean Follmer, Daniel Leithinger, Alex Olwal, Akimitsu Hogge and Hiroshi Ishii of the MIT Media Lab, explains the system in detail. They wrote that the system is a shape display that enables “dynamic affordances, constraints and actuation of passive objects. Shape displays allow for more general purpose shape change than many other actuated or shapechanging interfaces, and thus are ideal research platforms.”Shape displays still remain limited in scale and cost, they said, but “this work is an exploration of the interaction capabilities and is meant to inspire further research in this area. Our belief is that shape-changing interfaces will become increasingly available in the future, and this work tries to push towards creating a vocabulary and design space for more general-purpose interaction for shape displays, including rendering of both content and UI elements.”A key comment that indicates the role of inFORM within their overall research efforts is what they say on their inFORM web page: “InFORM is a step toward our vision of Radical Atoms.”The Tangible Media Group explain how they view graphical user interfaces, tangible user interfaces, and Radical Atoms: “A graphical user interface only lets us see information and interact with it indirectly, as if we were looking through the surface of the water to interact with the forms below.” A tangible user interface, meanwhile, is “like an iceberg: there is a portion of the digital that emerges beyond the surface of the water—into the physical realm—so that we may interact directly with it.” Radical Atoms describes the group’s “vision for the future of interaction, in which all digital information has physical manifestation so that we can interact directly with it—as if the iceberg had risen from the depths to reveal its sunken mass.” (Phys.org) —The Tangible Media Group at MIT Media Lab have been working on a shape-shifting surface called inFORM where, as their video indicates, users interact with digital matter in interesting ways that go far beyond boxed-in interactions with a traditional computer. Outside MIT, observers have described their system not only as a shape display but as a shape-shifting surface; The team at MIT that is behind inFORM explain it as a “Dynamic Shape Display that can render 3D content physically, so users can interact with digital information in a tangible way. inFORM can also interact with the physical world around it, for example moving objects on the table’s surface. Remote participants in a video conference can be displayed physically, allowing for a strong sense of presence and the ability to interact physically at a distance.” Explore further More information: tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/tangible.media.mit.edu/vision/ © 2013 Phys.org They are now exploring application areas for the inFORM shape display. How could it be used in real-life scenarios? The team sees one potential in geospatial data, such as maps, GIS, terrain models and architectural models. “Urban planners and architects can view 3-D designs physically and better understand, share and discuss their designs.” They would also like to explore surgical simulations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more