Students help gain votes

first_imgOn Nov. 2, voters in the 2nd District of Indiana will go to the polls to elect current representative, Democrat Joe Donnelly, or Republican Jackie Walorski to be their congressional representative. Over the next few weeks leading up to Election Day, several Notre Dame students who are interning with either of the congressional campaigns may approach Indiana residents and try to sway them to one candidate or another. One such intern for Donnelly, junior Conor Bolich, said his Notre Dame education armed him with skills that have proven critical in his time working with the campaign. “I feel very prepared working on the campaign,” he said. “Notre Dame has done a really good job with communicating and networking skills that are very important in politics.” Senior Eunice Ikene, also of the Donnelly campaign, said her classroom experiences have challenged her to sharpen her political knowledge. This in turn benefited her work with the campaign. “Notre Dame has helped with being up to date, such as when a voter asks about health care and small businesses,” she said. “It is not specifically in the curriculum, but when it comes up in class you want to know what is going on.” Senior Charlie Nejedly is working with Walorski’s campaign. He said he spends his time interacting with voters over the telephone and in person. “I do phone calls for Jackie Walorski and more broadly the Indiana Republican Party, and I go door to door for Jackie around South Bend and Mishawaka,” he said. Ikene and Bolich said they spend most of their time making phone calls and canvassing as well. Bolich said these pursuits are critical in understanding what voters expect from their candidates. “Just going out and listening to what voters have to say has been so important. Canvassing allows you to understand what the voters have to say,” he said. Ikene said communication is crucial in finding out what voters have to say about the campaigns as well. “One of my primary duties is making calls to voters who have leaned Democrat,” she said. “You can ask if there are any issues they have and a lot of the time voters complain about negative ads.” Ikene said her interest in these aspects of campaigning were the driving force behind her decision to work on a congressional campaign this fall. “I took a class last semester on campaign strategy that focused on polarization and negative ads,” she said. “I wanted to see how it applied to a smaller campaign in north Indiana.” Nejedly said previous political experience and his interest in the democratic process sparked his inspiration for working on the Walorski campaign. “I worked at a political action committee this summer and I thought that getting campaign experience in the field would be fun,” he said. “Those who volunteer represent the hard work of democracy. Things like getting out the vote, regular people might not do, but it is important for the democratic process.” Ikene said one thing that surprised her in her time with the campaign was the lack of basic political knowledge in some voters. “I find it interesting that some people have no idea what is going on. These are people who are registered voters, who do not even know the opposing candidate,” she said. “The fact that you don’t know who is running, that is odd.” Ikene also said that for the most part, voters she has personally interacted with have been receptive and polite. However, she said she had one bad experience with a man at one household in Granger. “This guy took forever to get to the door. When he did, he didn’t even look at me. His dog was yapping and I was scared that it was going to attack me,” she said. “After I was done, he told me he was Republican and to not waste his time.” Nejedly said working on this election has reminded him of the responsibility Indiana voters are tasked with this November. “Just staying updated on these midterm elections in general is important for our economy especially in a district like ours. What happens now could mean a job or not for some people,” he said. “It forces me to stay updated on the current events.”last_img read more

Pedestrian Killed in North Babylon Crash

first_imgA pedestrian was killed early Tuesday morning in a crash in North Babylon, Suffolk County police said.Detectives said a 59-year-old Florida man was driving a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee southbound on Route 231 near Pell Avenue just before 4 a.m. when his mid-size SUV struck the male pedestrian.The man was pronounced dead at the scene by the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, police said. He was not identified.The driver was not injured.The Jeep was impounded for a safety check, and the investigation is continuing, police said. Anyone with information about this crash is asked to call the First Squad at 631-854-8152. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img

5 things to know about the mobile transformation of payments

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Mobile technology enables members to make faster and more convenient payments than ever before.Consumers can pay for monthly expenses—or even pay the babysitter—from a mobile device when and where it is most convenient for them.These transactions are processed securely and instantly, freeing up valuable time for people to focus on other important things.For younger generations, particularly millennials (those ages 18 to 35), mobile payments are becoming a bigger part of everyday life, including at the point-of-sale. With a simple scan of a smartphone or wearable device, the payment process is made quicker and easier for everyone involved.Older generations have also taken notice of this and are adopting mobile payments, albeit at a more leisurely pace.With technology playing an increasingly vital role in our daily lives, credit unions are transforming to serve their members in line with new expectations. continue reading »last_img read more

Oddschecker – Nations League innovation invigorates international football

first_img Martin Lycka – Regulatory high temperatures cancel industry’s ‘silly season’ August 11, 2020 Related Articles MoneyMatrix boosts wire transfer options by integrating Klarna’s Sofort August 24, 2020 Share Mateusz Juroszek – Non-stop STS will expand amid industry disruptions August 12, 2020 StumbleUpon Submit Share Inevitable anticipation accompanies the recommencing of club football, however thanks to UEFA’s much scorned Nations League tournament, this international break filled fans with the same excitement and elation that would normally only be associated with club football. It was formerly a regular feature of international breaks for games to fade to a conclusion, with both sides settling on what they had in the last 20 minutes, choosing to reserve energy for upcoming league ties. This is something that seems to have been eradicated with the introduction of relegations and three team groups, an idea that when first touted was criticised by most football fans. The increased significance of the games in this tournament was on display, not only in England’s heart-stopping comeback against Croatia, but also as Scotland edged out Israel to secure top spot at Hampden Park and when a youthful Holland side fought back from two goals down to condemn Germany to relegation. The heightened excitement in games over the international has predictably led to a spike in betting activity, both in-play, on pre-match markets and even on ante post betting for a period that bookmakers would have previously deemed a dry spell as far as punting goes. Oddschecker’s Callum Wilson gave us an insight into the popularity of the tournament, speaking after the England defeated Croatia, he revealed: “Over the last seven days, the team that has had the biggest stake of bet and greatest bet count is England in their game against Croatia. The game against the USA does not fare in the top five of these statistics, giving you a snapshot of the popularity that the Nations league has achieved compared to ‘regular’ international friendlies.”He also emphasised the elevated importance of the games has seen in-play betting become a more attractive prospect for punters: “In-play betting tends to lend itself in popularity to the game in question, rather than the style of match itself. “While the matches may receive more in-play betting than regular friendlies, this will be down more to the number of people watching than anything else. However, we have seen a higher volume of bets from the Three Lions’ game against Croatia than there were in England’s friendly against the USA.”Underlining the importance of the Nations League ante post element, he added: “We received a spike in activity on our Nations League outright page following the final whistle of yesterday’s game against Croatia, and the Three lions went into 5/2 to win the Nations League off the back of their dramatic win. It’s another market for punters and one that could hold significant value with the tournament in its embryonic stages.”The Nations League concludes in June, when the four winners of the top league, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and England head to Portugal to contest a short knockout tournament to crown the inaugural Nations League winners.last_img read more