‘It’s a fantastic feat’ – Barbican target extending four-year unbeaten run, more titles

first_imgCoach of Barbican FC Charles Edwards says his team aims to continue its dominance in the local Women’s Football League. Barbican notched their 11th Jamaica Football Federation (JFF)/Sherwin Williams Women’s League title when they beat Waterhouse 4-2 in the final at Stadium East last Sunday. Tashika Small netted a brace for the champions, scoring in the 13th and 52nd minutes, while Kenesha Reid (11th) and Latoya Duhaney (61st) scored the other goals. Waterhouse’s national Under-20 player, Jessica Johnson, scored in the 68th and 90th minutes. LEAGUE TITLE It was also Barbican’s eighth consecutive league title. The east St Andrew club has won 24 trophies in women’s football and seven Sherwin Williams Colourscape knockout titles, plus six mid-season trophies. That has made them the most successful club in women’s football locally. Barbican had also beaten Waterhouse 4-1 in the KO final a week earlier. “We have not lost a game since 2011, so that is a record we would like to strengthen as long as possible,” Edwards disclosed. “It is a fantastic feat in winning so many titles and the girls want to win to add more, so they are motivated and certainly looking forward to next year,” the long-serving Barbican coach added. Barbican FC will be handed the trophy, medals, and $400,000 at the awards ceremony scheduled for Thursday at the JFF’s offices in New Kingston.last_img read more

SA rugby ref breaks barrier for women

first_imgJordaan, who represented South Africa in 2009 at both the Women’s Nations Cup in Canada and Women’s Sevens World Cup in Dubai, refereed the match between Peru and Paraguay at the Confederacion Sudamericana de Rugby (Consur) Sevens at the Club Regatas do Flamengo in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. “Marlize has grown so much in her career as a referee that we weren’t surprised when we were told of her appointment,” Watson said. At the Consur Sevens, Uruguay’s men and Brazil’s women claimed the final remaining spots at the Rugby World Cup Sevens 2013, which will take place at Moscow’s iconic Luzhniki Stadium from 28 to 30 June. 27 February 2013 ‘Expecting big things’ The tournament served as a qualifier for the Rugby World Cup Sevens 2013, which take place in Russia in June. South Africa’s Marlize Jordaan made history when she became the first woman to referee in an international sevens rugby match for men in South America this past weekend. “Last week Marlize refereed the Varsity Cup Young Guns match between the under-20 teams of Kovsies and UP-Tuks, and was very good. In 2012, she also handled two matches in the Absa U19B Tournament with great aplomb. Bernd Gabbei, the referee development consultant for the International Rugby Board, said Jordaan’s appointment for the match between Peru and Paraguay was based on merit after a few superb performances in the women’s tournament, which was taking place at the same time. SAinfo reporter An achievement to celebrateAndre Watson, the South African Rugby Union’s general manager of referees, said Jordaan’s achievement was one to celebrate for the entire South African rugby fraternity. “We’re really expecting big things from her and are very proud of her achievement in South America.” Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

A dramatic evening for dramatic need

first_imgFeaturing high profile actors sharing powerful stories raised enough money to fund a permanent arts centre in rural South Africa.A massive fund raising campaign staged by celebrity actors in the UK to raise money for South African children has inspired local thespians to put together a star-studded event of their own.THE CHILDREN’S MONOLOGUESFeaturing high profile actors sharing powerful stories raised enough money to fund a permanent arts centre in rural South Africa. Now our local stage celebrities are preparing to replicate the event to raise money for the same charity, Dramatic Need.The UK version first ran in 2010 starring famous names like Nicole Kidman, Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor and James McAvoy.The local version being staged by the Market Theatre’s artistic director James Ngcobo working with Mfundi Vundla as Executive Producer, Mfundi who has a long standing relationship with Dramatic Need.The Market Theatre production will feature Jamie Bartlett, Robert Whitehead, Lesedi Job, Sonia Radebe, Masasa Mbangeni, Sello Maake Ka Ncube, Lebo Toko, Nokukhanya Dlamini, Gugu Shezi and Nomfundo Dlamini with live music from Tshepo Mngoma.This moving production in aid of Dramatic Need will play for one night only on Friday 20 May, 2016.The Children’s Monologues brings alive the true stories of more than 200 children in rural South Africa as they try to come to terms with moments that changed their lives forever.For many of these kids that means searching for answers in the aftermath of rape, death, and injustice.For others it is about trying to hold on to a memory that still inspires happiness. The Market Theatre has selected 15 of these moving soliloquies.The stories have been adapted for the stage by a Who’s Who of writers, including Napo Masheane, Elliot Moleba, James Graham, Neil La Bute, Laura Wade, Jack Thorne, Roy Williams OBE and Tanika Gupta MBE and Sir David Hare – from first-hand accounts of children supported by the charity.SPONSORSHIPThe fundraising evening will host corporates, high profile individuals, providing a powerful platform for corporates to partner with us.Sponsorship opportunities include:Headline Partner• Brand association: at the event, online, and in print• Visibility in all printed materials and digital platforms• ‘Sponsor a Monologue’ – credit as a supporter of a specific performance and piece• The opportunity to be established with a cutting-edge arts event and a forward-thinking, international charity.To Learn More Follow the link: www.dramaticneed.org.ABOUT DRAMATIC NEEDDramatic Need introduces vulnerable children in rural South Africa and Rwanda to the creative arts as a means to cope with trauma and hardship.It works to develop visual literacy and freedom of expression without recourse to violence. The organisation believes that creativity, not money, has the best chance of changing a generation of children’s attitudes to themselves and to each other.Through engagement in drama, visual arts, filmmaking and music, these children are empowered to confront complex issues with confidence and to resolve – rather than engage in conflict. Its classes are running at full capacity, with demand far outstripping what it is able to supply.ABOUT THE CHILDREN’S MONOLOGUESThe original Monologues played to a sold-out theatre and were covered by every major news outlet in the UK.The production highlighted to an international audience the challenges these children face and the power of creative storytelling to change attitudes and prejudice within developing communities.It was a unique event, in terms of offering both glamour and integrity.The proceeds funded a permanent arts centre in rural South Africa that now runs six workshops a week and serves hundreds of local children.The original event was staged at London’s The Old Vic and was put together by Danny Boyle, a founding trustee of Dramatic Need. Its stars included Sir Nen Kingsley and Eddie Redmayne. The second airing in 2015 was a sell-out performance at The Royal Court Theatre.Tickets cost R200 each with all the proceeds going towards Dramatic Need, which runs an arts and culture centre in a farm in the very poor community of Viljoenskroon, Free State.Ngcobo is also asking companies or individuals to come forward with sponsorship to make it a huge success and raise enough money to make sure more children have a story with a happy ending.The fundraising evening will give corporates and high profile individuals a powerful platform and the opportunity to be associated with a cutting-edge arts event and a forward-thinking, international charity.For bookings and donations call:Anthony Ezeokeon 011 025 0377 (Direct Line) or 083 246 4950 / 072 413 9247AnthonyE@markettheatre.co.zaDate: 20 May 2016Time: 07:00pmTickets: R200last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast September 30, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We put together two sunny, dry and very warm days here to start off the week. After a soggy weekend in parts of the eastern corn belt (particularly north), we are going to see mother nature shift the evaporation machine into high gear over the next 2 days. We see sunshine and strong south flow combining to take temps to well above normal levels today and tomorrow. Wednesday we continue to see the sunshine and warm air in the central and southern parts of Ohio, but we can see a few more clouds developing in the afternoon up north, and that may take just a bit off our temperature top end. We have to keep our eyes out for a few scattered showers in far northern areas overnight Wednesday night through Thursday, but generally we think the biggest threat stay farther north. For now, we will say there is shower potential from US 20 northward, more so in NW Ohio than in the east. Partly to mostly sunny skies remain over the rest of the state for Thursday.We are sunny and cooler for Friday, with colder air sagging southward out of the Great Lakes. Temps can be somewhat chilly Friday morning, but there is no risk…we repeat…no risk of frost. The closest frost comes is into central Michigan.Sun will be followed by increasing clouds on Saturday, and that may lead to some late afternoon and evening scattered showers. However, there is better rain potential for Sunday with showers and thunderstorms over more of the state. Still, the heaviest potential is northeast. WE can see .3″-1.2″ with coverage at 80%. Monday will have clouds giving way to sun, but some rain can still hold on in far southern parts of Ohio, at least through the morning. We are fully dry to finish the 10 day period.10 day rain totalsThe extended 11-16 day window is wetter, with at least 2 and perhaps 3 threats of rain. Thursday the 10th we have rain bringing .25″-1.25″ over 80% of the state. Then on Saturday the 12th we can pick up another .25″-1.25″ from I-70 south, while northern areas miss out. Scattered showers return on the 15th, but only will give up to .25″ or less.Temperatures will be very warm the next 2 days, but will be closer to normal from late this week through the middle of October. Remember, though, that normal temps are falling as we move through October.last_img read more

What We Didn’t Get At Apple’s iPhone Event

first_imgTags:#Apple#Apple TV#iPad#iphone 5C#iPhone 5S#iWatch#Mac OS X We waited a long time for Apple to announce its first major products of the year. And then we got two: the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C, plus the official launch of iOS 7. But Apple sells way more than iPhones, but didn’t have a lot to say about its other products. Here’s what Apple didn’t announce today that we might see later this year or early in 2014.The iWatchApple hasn’t ever confirmed that it’s working on a smartwatch, long rumored to be called the iWatch. But many pundits believe it is, and thought Samsung hoped to get a jump on Apple in the smartwatch category by a week when it announced the Galaxy Gear last week at IFA in Berlin.Coming into today’s iPhone 5S/5C announcement, no rumors abounded about the so-called iWatch. It is fairly rare these days for Apple to announce a product without a massive rumor mill grinding away. So it wasn’t a huge surprise that Apple didn’t officially enter the “arm race” today.Best guess for the iWatch: The first or second quarter of 2014.New iPadsApple likes to keep most of its major device announcements independent of one other. Given that Apple hasn’t announced a major new product in some time—outside of some computer refreshes at its Worldwide Developer Conference in June—many people expected that today would be a multi-product announcement. One more thing? No, there is no one more thing.That’s fine, though, because it sets Apple up for a big fall with more products theoretically coming down the pipeline. The next most likely on the agenda are new versions of the iPad and iPad Mini. We will likely see the A7 chip come to the iPad while the Mini might get Retina Display.Best guess for new iPads: The end of October this year.New iPodsThe iPod is technically an iOS device (the same operating system that runs the iPad and iPhone), so it was reasonable to think that Apple would throw in a new iPod Touch while announcing the new iPhones. Didn’t happen this year. The iPod is no longer a major product for Apple and no longer warrants its own event or really anything more than a quiet press release (if that) sometime in the middle of the year. Apple last announced new iPods in May this year and didn’t need to refresh the lineup this year for the holiday shopping season.Best guess for new iPods: Sometime before Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference 2014, perhaps late May or early June. Apple TVApple just went through an entire presentation and didn’t mention its Apple TV product once. The longer Apple plays possum with the Apple TV, the more people will start to think it doesn’t care all that much about the television realm.Apple didn’t announce a refresh (hardware or software) to its Apple TV set top box today, nor did it even remotely hint that it may (or may not) eventually build its own actual television set. Apple TV wasn’t mentioned during the brief rundown of iOS 7 that preceded the announcement of the new iPhones at today’s announcement. The television is certainly a second class citizen for Apple at this point.New MacBooks or iMacs or Mac OS XApple usually doesn’t mix announcements of its mobile and PC products outside of developer issues at WWDC. Today was no exception. The Mac Pro is still coming down the product pipeline and the MacBooks that were announced at WWDC in June are still in line. Apple also did not mention Mac OS X, the operating system that runs its computers. The new version of OS X, Mavericks, will be released later this fall. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts center_img dan rowinski Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

A Simple Guide to Optimizing Your Landing Pages [Infographic]

first_img Landing Page Optimization Writing and designing a valuable offer is only the first step of getting leads out of that offer — next, you’ve got to set up landing pages so you can actually get those leads. That’s why it’s so critical to make sure your landing pages are properly optimized. Every tweak you make, big or small, could have a huge impact on the number of visitors that convert to leads.So how do you actually optimize your page? Which parts should you choose to change up to get the best results (the headline, the form, the copy itself, etc.)?Never fear: This infographic from the folks at QuickSprout sets out to answer these very questions. In it, you’ll learn the nine elements of high converting landing page design, how to maximize SEO and usability, and how to test effectiveness and calculate ROI.473Save Originally published Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated August 08 2017 473SaveWant to learn more about optimizing landing pages for lead generation? Check out our free ebook on landing page optimization.center_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Job Interviews Gone Wrong: 9 Professionals Share Their Most Awkward Stories

first_imgInterviews are vulnerable times.There aren’t many things more nerve-wracking than walking into a room of people you desperately want to impress, and then getting questioned about (and ultimately judged on) your career choices, goals, strengths, weaknesses, and overall personality.And, as if that weren’t bad enough, what if you’ve totally sweat through your shirt and it’s visible to everyone? Or your heel broke on the way to the office? Or you accidentally ordered the messiest dish on the menu?Thanks a lot, Murphy’s Law.Where do you see yourself in five years? Take our free quiz here to figure out the next step in your career.We all have an embarrassing story or two from our job interviews, but some are definitely worse than others.We surveyed professionals about job interviews gone wrong for this article. After laughing a lot — and cringing a lot, too — we chose some of our favorites stories to share with you in this post. (Names and identifying details have been changed.)1) The Open Fly”I was interviewing for a pretty senior level position at a formal company, so I wore a suit. I went to the bathroom before the interview, and while I was pulling the zipper up, it broke. I started freaking out, looking for a pin or something to hold it closed. I found nothing and worked myself up into a pretty big sweat. I walked into the interview red in the face, sweaty, and with an open fly, which I tried to awkwardly conceal by folding my suit jacket over my arm, shielding the view of my pants. They must not have noticed because I got the job! (And also got my pants fixed.)”2) The Miscalculated Hug”In a final round of interviews with a large company, the women in HR who I had been speaking with for the majority of the process invited me into her office to see how my meetings with the hiring managers went. As she started to walk toward me, she began to put her arm up, signaling as if she was about to give me a small nice-to-see-you hug (we had gotten to know each other over the recent weeks). To reciprocate, I started to motion a hug back, until I noticed she was only trying to shut the door behind me. It was extremely awkward. She didn’t call me back afterward.”3) The Mix-Up”Once I went to an interview … and realized mid-way through it was a date. (Enough said.)”4) The White Lie”I was interviewing for a copywriting job at a fashion company. At that point in my life, I was not making very much money at all. (As in, I ate leftovers from my office’s fridge when rent was due at the end of the month.) In my interview with the fashion company, they asked me what kinds of stores I like to shop at — and the truth was that I shopped at cheap department stores because that’s all I could afford at the time. I debated being honest and saying that, but knowing that could jeopardize my chances of getting the job, I ultimately decided to try to lie my way into an acceptable answer. But … then they asked me follow-up questions about each store I named, none of which I’d ever stepped foot into. I fumbled, the interview ended several minutes later, and I didn’t hear from them again.”5) The Totally Bizarre”My senior year of college, I traveled to New York for interviews with an agency through Career Services at my school. My first indication that something was wrong was when no one at the company could tell me when to book my return train, even though my first interview was scheduled for 11:00 a.m. Then, I found out that everyone I spoke to — six or so people — had been there for less than three months, and it was a very small company (15-20 people). “Next, I got the ‘let’s leave the interviewee in the conference room and see what happens’ move. After about five minutes, I stuck my head out and had to go down the hall to find someone, since my next interviewer was nowhere to be seen. I finally found someone — a new guy who was super apologetic — he found the person who was supposed to be interviewing me, who was just hanging out waiting for me to be proactive. Finally, I interviewed with the CEO. I walked into the interview and right off the bat, and he started mocking my ‘little Ivy League suit.’ But everyone in the office was wearing a suit … and they had been recruiting at my school!”From there, it only went downhill. After condescendingly mocking my appearance, he went on to make personal attacks about my family, my previous professional experience, and even my academic choices. It was bizarre and, frankly, psychotic. I walked out almost in tears, but sent follow-up emails to everyone else I interviewed with that day. I got an email back really late on a Friday night from one of the guys who interviewed me, apologizing for the CEO’s behavior and saying he’d be happy to help me get a job elsewhere (since apparently he ‘can be hard on people’). “I ended up withdrawing my candidacy since I couldn’t imagine being a subordinate of someone who was that controlling and awful (because I could only imagine how he treated his employees — if his interview behavior was any indicator). When I withdrew my application I made it very clear that it was due to the behavior of the CEO. He responded saying “Thank you for your message, albeit perplexed as to what you could be referring to. I wish you all the best in your future endeavors!”6) The Forever Intern”I once interviewed for a VP-level position, and the hiring manager asked me to describe each position I held, from first to most recent. I spent only a few seconds detailing my first internship, which I held more than 15 years earlier. Not so fast. He insisted I’d moved on too quickly, and he wanted me to spend more time explaining what I did as an intern. So I took out my resume and read it to him word for word to emphasize the pointlessness of his unweighted process.”7) The Please-Don’t-Pee-My-Pants”Probably the worst interview experience I’ve ever had was at a callback interview. I was meeting with four people, each for 30 minutes. This was my third callback of the week, so I was pretty tired the morning of the interview — and since it was super early in the morning, I went to Panera to get an iced tea before the interview started. I was also kind of starting to lose my voice, so I accepted the water they offered me when I arrived at the office. “After consuming all these liquids, by the time I sat down for my third interview but after we had already begun talking, I realized I really had to pee. I don’t even remember what I said to the interviewer because I was so focused on not peeing my pants. I was bright red, sweating, and kept uncrossing and recrossing my legs. As soon as the 30 minutes were over (thank goodness I made it without a disaster), I immediately asked to use the restroom before my last interview began. It was probably really obvious I had to pee the whole time since I definitely didn’t look so hot. I didn’t get an offer.”8) The Lost Helmet”I once interviewed for a marketing manager position at a company that sells outdoor gear. In keeping with the outdoor theme, I opted to ride my bike to the interview. I got there super early and decided to kill some time reading by the water. I put my bike on its kickstand next to me and hung my helmet on the handlebar. It was SUPER windy that day, and in a total freak occurrence, the wind blew my bike down and my helmet fell into the water! It was like a 20-foot drop down to the water, so there was no retrieving it. The first thing the hiring manager asked when I walked into the store was, ‘You don’t wear a helmet?!’ I tried to explain what happened but it was so outrageous that it sounded like a lie.”9) The Coffee Slip-Up”I was interviewing to become an undergraduate professor at a very traditional, prestigious university. I got there about 25 minutes early so I could look for parking, go to the bathroom, and maybe even get some coffee. It was 7:30 a.m. so nobody was in school yet. I went ahead and bought a small cup of coffee and walked with it towards a table where I could read a newspaper while I waited. Somehow, I spilled half the cup of coffee over my recently bought white blouse.”I had 25 minutes to fix it, so I sprinted to the bathroom and got some water and soap to get it off. I was halfway through washing it out, leaning over the sink in a very ridiculous position, and a lady came in and asks me if  was all right. I told her about my stupid mistake, and how this was a super traditional school so I had dressed up in my suit and white blouse, and so and so forth — I kind of babbled all this at her. Once it looked decent enough (after eventually crawling under the hand dryer to make it dry), I was only five minutes early for my interview. I got in and the interviewer was the same lady that I bumped into the bathroom. My face must have clearly shown my embarrassment because she just laughed. I still got the job.”What’s your worst interview story? Share with us in the comments below!  Interviews Originally published Oct 14, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more

Running an Email A/B Test? How to Determine Your Sample Size & Testing Time Frame

first_img4) Click “Calculate.”5) Your sample size will spit out. Ta-da! The calculator will spit out your sample size. In our example, our sample size is: 274.This is the size one of your variations needs to be. So for your email send, if you have one control and one variation, you’ll need to double this number. If you had a control and two variations, you’d triple it. (And so on.)6) Depending on your email program, you may need to calculate the sample size’s percentage of the whole email.HubSpot customers, I’m looking at you for this section. When you’re running an email A/B test, you’ll need to select the percentage of contacts to send the list to — not just the raw sample size. To do that, you need to divide the number in your sample by the total number of contacts in your list. Here’s what that math looks like, using the example numbers above:274 / 1000 = 27.4%This means that each sample (both your control AND your variation) needs to be sent to 27-28% of your audience — in other words, roughly a total of 55% of your total list.And that’s it! You should be ready to select your sending time. How to Choose the Right Time Frame for Your A/B TestOkay, so this is where we get into the reality of email sending: You have to figure out how long to run your email A/B test before sending a (winning) version on to the rest of your list. Figuring out the timing aspect is a little less statistically driven, but you should definitely use past data to help you make better decisions. Here’s how you can do that.If you don’t have timing restrictions on when to send the winning email to the rest of the list, head over to your analytics. Figure out when your email opens/clicks (or whatever your success metrics are) starts to drop off. Look your past email sends to figure this out. For example, what percentage of total clicks did you get in your first day? If you found that you get 70% of your clicks in the first 24 hours, and then 5% each day after that, it’d make sense to cap your email A/B testing timing window for 24 hours because it wouldn’t be worth delaying your results just to gather a little bit of extra data. In this scenario, you would probably want to keep your timing window to 24 hours, and at the end of 24 hours, your email program should let you know if they can determine a statistically significant winner.Then, it’s up to you what to do next. If you have a large enough sample size and found a statistically significant winner at the end of the testing time frame, many email marketing programs will automatically and immediately send the winning variation. If you have a large enough sample size and there’s no statistically significant winner at the end of the testing time frame, email marketing tools might also allow you to automatically send a variation of your choice.If you have a smaller sample size or are running a 50/50 A/B test, when to send the next email based on the initial email’s results is entirely up to you. If you have time restrictions on when to send the winning email to the rest of the list, figure out how late you can send the winner without it being untimely or affecting other email sends. For example, if you’ve sent an email out at 6 p.m. EST for a flash sale that ends at midnight EST, you wouldn’t want to determine an A/B test winner at 11 p.m. Instead, you’d want to send the email closer to 8 or 9 p.m. — that’ll give the people not involved in the A/B test enough time to act on your email.And that’s pretty much it, folks. After doing these calculations and examining your data, you should be in a much better state to send email A/B tests — ones that are fairly statistically valid and help you actually move the needle in your email marketing. Topics: Originally published Dec 11, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated October 29 2019 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img A/B Testing Do you remember your first A/B test on email? I do. (Nerdy, I know.) I felt simultaneously thrilled and terrified because I knew I had to actually use some of what I learned in college stats for my job. I sat on the cusp of knowing just enough about statistics that it could be dangerous. For instance, I knew that you needed a big enough sample size to run the test on. I knew I needed to run the test long enough to get statistically significant results. I knew I could easily run one if I wanted, using HubSpot’s Email App…. But that’s pretty much it. I wasn’t sure how big was “big enough” for sample sizes and how long was “long enough” for test durations — and Googling it gave me a variety of answers my college stats courses definitely didn’t prepare me for.Turns out I wasn’t alone: Those are two of the most common A/B testing questions we get from customers. And the reason the typical answers from a Google search aren’t that helpful is because they’re talking about A/B testing in an ideal, theoretical, non-marketing world. So, I figured I’d do the research to help answer this question for you in a practical way. At the end of this post, you should be able to know how to determine the right sample size and time frame for your next email send.Download Now: Email Marketing Planning Template Theory vs. Reality of Sample Size and Timing in Email A/B TestsIn theory, to determine a winner between Variation A and Variation B, you need to wait until you have enough results to see if there is a statistically significant difference between the two. Depending on your company, sample size, and how you execute the A/B test, getting statistically significant results could happen in hours or days or weeks — and you’ve just got to stick it out until you get those results. In theory, you should not restrict the time in which you’re gathering results.For many A/B tests, waiting is no problem. Testing headline copy on a landing page? It’s cool to wait a month for results. Same goes with blog CTA creative — you’d be going for the long-term lead gen play, anyway. But on email, waiting can be a problem — for several practical reasons:1) Each email send has a finite audience.Unlike a landing page (where you can continue to gather new audience members over time), once you send an email A/B test off, that’s it — you can’t “add” more people to that A/B test. So you’ve got to figure out how squeeze the most juice out of your emails. This will usually require you to send an A/B test to the smallest portion of your list needed to get statistically significant results, pick a winner, and then send the winning variation on to the rest of the list. 2) Running an email marketing program means you’re juggling at least a few email sends per week. (In reality, probably way more than that.) If you spend too much time collecting results, you could miss out on sending your next email — which could have worse effects than if you sent a non-statistically-significant winner email on to one segment of your database. 3) Email sends are often designed to be timely.Your marketing emails are optimized to deliver at a certain time of day, whether your emails are supporting the timing of a new campaign launch and/or landing in your recipient’s inboxes at a time they’d love to receive it. So if you wait for your email to be fully statistically significant, you might miss out on being timely and relevant — which could defeat the purpose of your email send in the first place. That’s why email A/B testing programs have a “timing” setting built in: At the end of that time frame, if neither result is statistically significant, one variation (which you choose ahead of time) will be sent to the rest of your list. That way, you can still run A/B tests in email, but you can also work around your email marketing scheduling demands and ensure people are always getting timely content.So to run A/B tests in email while still optimizing your sends for the best results, you’ve got to take both sample size and timing into account. Next up: how to actually figure out your sample size and timing using data.How to Actually Determine Your Sample Size and Testing Time FrameAlrighty, now on to the part you’ve been waiting for: how to actually calculate the sample size and timing you need for your next email A/B test. How to Calculate Your Email A/B Test’s Sample SizeLike I mentioned above, each email A/B test you send can only be sent to a finite audience — so you need to figure out how to maximize the results from that A/B test. To do that, you need to figure out the smallest portion of your total list needed to get statistically significant results. Here’s how you calculate it.1) Assess whether you have enough contacts in your list to A/B a sample in the first place.To A/B test a sample of your list, you need to have a decently large list size — at least 1,000 contacts. If you have fewer than that in your list, the proportion of your list that you need to A/B test to get statistically significant results gets larger and larger. For example, to get statistically significant results from a small list, you might have to test 85% or 95% of your list. And the results of the people on your list who haven’t been tested yet will be so small that you might as well have just sent half of your list one email version, and the other half another, and then measured the difference. Your results might not be statistically significant at the end of it all, but at least you’re gathering learnings while you grow your lists to have more than 1,000 contacts. (If you want more tips on growing your email list so you can hit that 1,000 contact threshold, check out this blog post.) Note for HubSpot customers: 1,000 contacts is also our benchmark for running A/B tests on samples of email sends — if you have fewer than 1,000 contacts in your selected list, the A version of your test will automatically be sent to half of your list and the B will be sent to the other half.2) Click here to open up this calculator.Here’s what it looks like when you open it up:3) Put in your email’s Confidence Level, Confidence Interval, and Population into the tool.Yep, that’s a lot of stat jargon. Here’s what these terms translate to in your email:Population: Your sample represents a larger group of people. This larger group is called your population.In email, your population is the typical number of people in your list who get emails delivered to them — not the number of people you sent emails to. To calculate population, I’d look at the past three to five emails you’ve sent to this list, and average the total number of delivered emails. (Use the average when calculating sample size, as the total number of delivered emails will fluctuate.)Confidence Interval: You might have heard this called “margin of error.” Lots of surveys use this, including political polls. This is the range of results you can expect this A/B test to explain once it’s run with the full population. For example, in your emails, if you have an interval of 5, and 60% of your sample opens your Variation, you can be sure that between 55% (60 minus 5) and 65% (60 plus 5) would have also opened that email. The bigger the interval you choose, the more certain you can be that the populations true actions have been accounted for in that interval. At the same time, large intervals will give you less definitive results. It’s a tradeoff you’ll have to make in your emails. For our purposes, it’s not worth getting too caught up in confidence intervals. When you’re just getting started with A/B tests, I’d recommend choosing a smaller interval (ex: around 5).  Confidence Level: This tells you how sure you can be that your sample results lie within the above confidence interval. The lower the percentage, the less sure you can be about the results. The higher the percentage, the more people you’ll need in your sample, too. Note for HubSpot customers: The Email App automatically uses the 85% confidence level to determine a winner. Since that option isn’t available in this tool, I’d suggest choosing 95%. Example:Let’s pretend we’re sending our first A/B test. Our list has 1,000 people in it and has a 95% deliverability rate. We want to be 95% confident our winning email metrics fall within a 5-point interval of our population metrics. Here’s what we’d put in the tool:Population: 950Confidence Level: 95%Confidence Interval: 5last_img read more

A Simple Guide to SEO for Local Businesses [Infographic]

first_imgWhen you find yourself in an unfamiliar area and you’re looking for a restaurant, coffee shop, sports store, or some other local business … how do you go about finding it?Most of us pull out our smartphone, open up a search engine, and search for a specific type of local business. That’s called a local search, and it’s for customers in a particular area who use online search engines to find a business in that area.According to Google’s own research, “50% of consumers who conducted a local search on their smartphone visited a store within a day, and 34% who searched on computer or tablet did the same.”With local businesses competing for the top spots in those searches, knowing how to optimize your website accordingly is key. To help you learn more about local SEO, SurePayroll created the infographic below. Check it out to learn the anatomy of a local Google search results page, how to optimize your website for local searches, and how to separate your search result from everyone else’s.75Save Originally published Nov 2, 2015 12:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Local SEOcenter_img 75SaveWhat local SEO tips can you add to the list? Share with us in the comments. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Setting Your Publishing App Up For Success

first_imgSo you’ve just invested time, money, and a lot of faith in a new publishing app. If all goes as planned, it’ll increase content consumption, give you a new channel for advertisers, and build loyalty among your readers. But what about getting people to use it in the first place? Just because you build it, doesn’t mean they will come.With 1.2 million apps in the iTunes Store, getting eyeballs and driving adoption rates to your own app can feel just as hard as building the app itself. Sending out one launch email to your database won’t be enough. So how can you drive adoption rates as well as increase engagement levels of the users who’ve already downloaded your app?Increasing Publishing App AdoptionThe first step is to convince people that your app is worth downloading in the first place. To help your app stand out from the rest, start by…Making the benefits clear: In order for anyone to want to download any app, they need to understand what’s in it for them. Why shouldn’t someone just visit your site for content? Make the benefits, relevance, and value-add abundantly clear to your readers by clearly listing the extra functionality or features that your app provides. Will they be getting exclusive content on the app? Will articles be served to them based on their preferences? Can they enjoy content offline? Or without ads? All of these should be talking points you incorporate in the app store, on your website, and in email communication. Using smart content: Fish where the fish are. Use smart content to your advantage to highlight app download calls-to-action to anyone visiting your website via a mobile device. This catches people in the very behavior—reading on their mobile—that warrants the use of your new app. The same techniques can be used for email. Consider smart content that allows you to add a special PS to any email read on a smartphone or tablet. Getting social: Analyze your company’s performance on each social channel you use to determine where users are most engaged. From there, ramp up on organic content promoting your app, or consider running app-install ads to extend your reach. Focus targeting on users who are on mobile, already follow or like your account, and have interests relevant to your publication. For more on what to consider before launching an app-install campaign, check out this post. Using segmentation: If a certain set of on-site actions indicate download intent, use those to your advantage and create audience segments and workflow lists based on those criteria. Then set up CTAs “retargeting” those groups.Increasing Engagement with Publishing AppsHow many times have you downloaded an app, only to stick in a folder and forget about it several days later? Don’t let your app be forgotten. Instead…Keep content fresh: For readers to use an app on a regular basis, they need to feel like they’re getting new, updated content each time they log in. Put an editorial calendar in place, and give your development team deadlines to ensure regular, consistent content gets shared. Use analytics to understand users’ average time between repeat visits, and use that to inform your calendar.Don’t stop promoting: Don’t stop promotion efforts right after you launch your app. Continue app promotion on your website, social accounts, and in email, highlighting any updates, upgrades, or new content. Fatigued users can be re-invigorated by the promise of something new.  Use workflows: Use app data and user behavior to create re-engagement workflows with email. For example, you could send users who have download your app an automatic feedback survey after one week, or have a set of social ads displayed to readers who haven’t logged in after a certain amount of time.Answer FAQs: Give readers a tool to help them navigate your app more easily, and ensure they have something to reference to use the app to their fullest advantage. This can come in a variety of formats, from FAQs to in-app tutorials. You’ve worked hard to get users. Don’t let a poor in-app experience or unrealized features to be the reason people don’t come back.Pay attention to analytics: Regularly measure how readers are using your app. Which features do they engage with most? Which articles lead to reading other articles? What keeps users engaged the longest? Take these findings into account when you are planning to release new content or develop upgrades for your app.Increasing adoption rates and engagement with your app shouldn’t be an afterthought, but it also doesn’t need to be an overwhelming process. By using what you have in place and putting together a sound release strategy, you’ll increase your ability to attract and keep app users.  Originally published Oct 29, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Content Distributionlast_img read more