How to Split-Test Your Facebook Ads to Maximize Conversions

first_img Facebook Advertising Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jan 18, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: It’s tough to nail down a successful Facebook advertising strategy unless you do some testing. However, testing Facebook ads, with all their nuances and constant updates, might seem scary. In this post, we’ll walk you through the basics and functions of Facebook ad split-testing.Understanding Facebook Ad CampaignsIn the Facebook Ads Manager, you arrange your ads into campaigns. A campaign is a group of similar ads that have the same purpose but slightly different variations. The chart below is just an example of how you can arrange your campaigns. The ads belonging to each campaign will be split-testing different variables. For instance, you can test different versions of an image or a title to find out the most effective one to use in your ad.6 Split-Testing Tips for Facebook Ads1. Change One Variable at a TimeYour main variables are the title, the picture, the copy, and the targeting.2. Keep Similar Ad ConditionsSame time of the day, same bid (although bid prices vary), same length of time, etc.3. Watch the ReportsIt may look like one ad did better than the other, but check the actual ‘Likes’ (fans) generated.4. Always Create a New AdDon’t try to tweak one that didn’t perform well. Facebook makes it easy to click on “Create a Similar Ad” so you preserve your settings.5. Try Split-Testing Your Destination Landing PageWhere do people land after they’ve clicked on your ad? Make sure the page is congruent with your message. If it’s your website, do you have the promised offer on the page? If you have the resources, you can also design two landing pages on your website where you send the traffic. In that way you, can optimize for a higher visitor-to-lead conversion rate.6. Rotate Your Ads OftenEven a well-performing ad will wear out its welcome. The ads are often served to the same audience several times, and if you aren’t rotating them every few days or when the CTR drops to 50% of its original value, you will be wasting your money.Here Is a Real-Life ExampleSome easy mistakes to make when split-testing Facebook ads is not testing the ad for a sufficient amount of time or letting it run too long and wasting your ad budget. A good comparison usually requires at least 20 clicks and requires that the ad run for at least two days. But clicks may not always be the best measure, depending on your targeting. You may want to run them for the same amount of impressions.Would you like to read more about advertising on Facebook? Download our free ebook, How to Create Epic Facebook Ads.last_img read more

When to Use Static vs. Dynamic Lists in Email Marketing

first_img Topics: Originally published Jun 13, 2012 12:30:00 PM, updated August 29 2017 In email marketing, the success of your messages is largely dependent on the quality of your list. And although we’ve talked a bunch about list segmentation and list health on this blog (have you taken our email list sniff test yet?), there’s still more you should understand about lists. (Who knew the topic of email lists could be so darn extensive?)What we’re referring to in this post is the concept of static lists vs. dynamic lists . Do you understand the distinction? It might sound simple, but we’re surprised by how many marketers really don’t know the difference — and when to use one or the other, for that matter. We’ll keep this lesson to the point so you can once and for all understand what distinguishes one list from the other, and start applying the right uses of each to your email marketing programs. What Are Static Lists? Quite simply, static lists are, well … static. These lists consist only of contacts you’ve accumulated up until the point when you create the list, and they remain unchanged unless you manually add or remove contacts. Static lists can either be created using contacts that already exist in your database, or through a manual upload to your email tool. Typically, they’re created through the latter method, as oftentimes they consist of contacts that were gathered through offline methods or other online campaigns not connected to interactions on your website. HubSpot’s email tool , for example, allows users to create static lists in both of these ways, as you can see from the screenshots below. When to Use Static Lists in Email Marketing Of all the types of email a marketer can send , static lists are generally good for one-off email sends, email campaigns that you run infrequently, and for lists of contacts that don’t change often. Here are a few examples of when you’d want to use a static list in your email marketing: Event Registrants, Attendees, or No-Show Lists: No one can travel back in time to register for or attend your event in the past, right? That’s why event lists tend to be ones that remain static. You might use these lists to send follow-up information or content post-event, whether it’s an in-person event or an online one like a webinar. Staff Lists: Do you send a quarterly newsletter to your company’s board of directors? How about an internal one to your business’ employees? These are lists of people that don’t typically change often, and you’ll probably also have to manually update them anyway. Trade Show Lists: Did you snag some prospects’ contact information from your presence at a trade show or another industry conference/event? This is a great use case for a static list upload. What Are Dynamic Lists? Dynamic email lists, on the other hand, are lists that constantly evolve as certain criteria are met. This criteria could include a specific property (e.g. contacts from a specific state or contacts from a specific industry), members of other lists (i.e. a list combining other lists!), or contacts who completed certain landing page forms . New contacts get added as they meet the criteria set for the list, and furthermore, dynamic lists will also remove people who no longer meet that criteria. Get it? Dynamic. These lists are powered by data and intelligence that can be collected by your marketing software or CRM as well as through interactions contacts have on your website, such as downloading content or visiting certain web pages. Dynamic lists are also critical for slicing and dicing your database into various segments for more effective and relevant email marketing .You’ll need to consult your email software provider to see if dynamic lists are part of its services available to you. To understand how they work, below is an example of a dynamic list in the making in HubSpot’s Contacts and Email tools . In our tool, we call these dynamic lists ‘Smart Lists.’ Here, we’re generating a segmented list of contacts who have Twitter follower counts of 1,000 or more. Once this list is established, as more of our contacts’ Twitter follower counts grow and meet that 1,000-follower threshold, the list will also grow. In addition, any contact whose follower count dips below 1,000 will automatically be removed from the list. So if we wanted to put some extra social media promotional muscle behind a particular piece of content or marketing offer, we might use this list to send an email to the contacts in our database with the greatest Twitter reach. Email Lists and Segmentation Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack When to Use Dynamic Lists in Email Marketing Dynamic lists are best used for email campaigns in which you plan on sending email more than once to a certain list of contacts that changes and gets updated frequently. As time goes on, your dynamic list would automatically adjust to your changing volume of contacts. This saves you the time from creating a new list every time you want to email that segment and keeps the list fresh and up to date in real time. Here are some examples of when you’d want to use a dynamic list in your email marketing: Customer List: Keeping your customers in the know with a monthly newsletter about your newest product tutorials, features, and other updates? New customers come, and (unfortunately), some go, so a dynamic customer list will enable you to automatically include new customers — and exclude ex-customers — on your next newsletter send. Free Trial Users: Use a dynamic list to send ongoing tips about how to get the most out of your company’s free product trial. This way, new contacts who start a free trial get automatically looped in the next time you send an email of tips to this list. Block Lists:  Dynamic lists can also be used to suppress certain contacts and protect recipients from receiving too many emails. For instance, you could create a dynamic list of anyone who has already signed up for an event, and block that continually updating list from future sends designed to promote the very same event. Interest-Based Lists: Create an evolving list of everyone who downloaded content on a particular topic, then make sure your emails to that list match that interest category.When it comes to dynamic lists, the possibilities really are plentiful — and powerful. Just think of all the very targeted email you could send! In what ways are you using dynamic lists to improve email segmentation ? Image Credit: adamentmeat last_img read more

The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Subscriber Email

first_img Originally published Jan 6, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 When was the last time you paid any attention to your blog subscriber emails? “My blog subscriber emails? I’m pretty sure those just … get sent, right?”Probably. For many marketers, subscriber emails were likely something you configured when you first launched your blog — never to be thought about again.If this sounds familiar and you’re treating your blog subscriber email like just another automated email you set and forgot, you could be missing out on a wealth of opportunity. Not to blame you, though. Most automated blog subscriber emails from software are nothing to write home about. In fact, HubSpot’s own software only recently, with the launch of our new Blog tool on HubSpot’s new COS, started giving customers the ability to truly customize their blog subscriber emails.But if you do have the ability to customize these emails, they’re definitely an important asset to leverage. After all, depending on how often you blog and how many email subscribers you have, these emails go out to quite a few of your contacts on a regular basis. Are you making the most of all their potential?Using the HubSpot software’s own blog email capabilities as our prototype, let’s dissect the anatomy of an optimized subscriber email so you can identify areas for improvement in your own emails.The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Subscriber Email1) Recognizable Sender NameMake sure your sender name makes it clear to recipients who the email is from. This is likely the first thing your subscribers notice about your email notifications, so if it’s not immediately evident to them that your email is from a known sender, your emails might end up straight in the trash.In HubSpot’s case, because multiple sections make up our blog, we use “HubSpot Blog” followed by the name of the particular section the contact is subscribed to as our sender name. This makes it easy for recipients to identify that the email is coming from, say, the marketing section of HubSpot’s blog.2) Clear, Catchy Subject LineBecause your email’s subject line is the most critical factor in whether your recipients decide to even open your email in the first place, make sure you give it ample thought.Considering your subscriber emails are most likely automated and triggered every time you publish a new post, a great approach here is to simply use the title of the blog post as your subject line — if your software enables you to do so like HubSpot’s does. Knowing this, make sure you take the subscriber email into consideration when you’re crafting your blog post titles.And be sure to avoid lengthy titles — 50 characters or fewer will ensure the subject line doesn’t get cut off in most email clients, particularly for mobile users. Also, make sure the title is catchy and interesting while also clearly indicating what the content is about. Misleading titles may get you the initial click, but over time, they will lead to the loss of subscribers’ trust — and ultimately, an increase in unsubscribes.3) Enticing Preview Text If your software enables you to customize the preview text of your email, this is another great opportunity to increase opens of your subscriber emails.The preview text is the copy that appears immediately following the subject line of your email. Use this real estate to further clarify what your recipients are getting and get them excited about what’s inside. Remind them that this is a notification email about your awesome new blog post and entice them to open it with some creative copy. But again, keep it brief! 4) Responsive Template Your email recipients are reading their emails on various devices, operating systems, and email clients — desktops, smartphones, tablets, iOS, Android, Gmail, Outlook — you name it! This means that in order to send effective blog subscriber emails, they should be optimized for each and every one of these different platforms. That’s where responsive email templates come in handy.A responsive template will automatically adjust to suit your email recipients’ individual situations — whether they’re using Gmail on a desktop, an Android smartphone, an iPad, or any other combination of software.So, if you have access to responsive email templates, use them! (Note: HubSpot’s Email tool has a variety of responsive templates to choose from and customize). If not, make sure you at least keep mobile email optimization best practices in mind when you’re designing your blog subscriber emails.5) Logo/Branding Now, on to the body of the email itself. Remember, getting your subscribers to open the email is only half the battle. The true goal is to get them to click through to the post itself. First things first: Incorporate some branding, such as your company’s logo, near the top of your email. This reassures subscribers that your email is coming from a trusted sender and adds some consistency to your blog notification emails.For instance, in HubSpot’s own blog subscriber emails, we use the same banner (with the addition of the HubSpot sprocket logo) that appears at the top of the section of the HubSpot blog the email is associated with.6) Personalization Greet your subscribers by name! If your blog software is connected to your contacts database, chances are you may know at least the names of many of your blog subscribers. Use it to your advantage and make your subscriber emails a little bit more personal using dynamic tags. Just be sure to set a default value for this dynamic tag for those people whose names are not in your contacts database.7) Introduction/Greeting You can also introduce your latest post and let your brand’s personality shine through with a quick, friendly greeting. Just keep in mind that, because your blog notification emails are automated, this greeting can easily get stale to recipients over time. If you’re going to incorporate a greeting, try to remember to switch it up every once in a while. 8) Clickable Blog TitleProminently display the title of the blog post you’re emailing about, and make sure it’s hyperlinked to the post itself. (If you’re using HubSpot’s new Blog tool, the title of your post is automatically pulled in to your email and hyperlinked for you.) This is exactly what your subscribers are looking for — and the main point of your email — so you want to make sure it’s easy to find to encourage clickthroughs.And as we mentioned earlier, when you’re brainstorming the title of your blog post, keep in mind how critical it is for generating clickthroughs from not only your emails, but also promotion in other channels like social media. For help with blog title generation, check out this simple formula for writing kick-ass titles. 9) Post Preview Some subscribers may need a little more convincing that your new post is worth the read before they decide to click through on your email. This is where the post preview comes in handy.Depending on the capabilities of your software, this is a good place to either provide a quick summary/description of your post or include the first few sentences of the post itself to draw readers in and entice them to click for more. Feel free to experiment with both to determine which generates more clickthroughs.If you’re using HubSpot’s new blog subscriber emails, you can choose to either show the post in full or just the content appearing before the “Read More Separator” (which you can set) in the post itself. Since the goal of your email is likely to drive subscribers back to your blog so they can explore not only this particular post but also your other content, I strongly recommend the latter. 10) Compelling Image and Alt TextUse the power of visual content to make your subscriber emails even more clickable by including a compelling, relevant image in your post preview. Not only will this help draw in the eye, but it will also make your emails more sharable, increasing the likelihood recipients will forward it to others and expand the reach of your blog content. And don’t forget to add relevant alt text for those recipients who either choose not to enable images in their email clients or whose email clients don’t support it. If you’re using HubSpot’s new blog notification emails, keep in mind that the image in your email will automatically get pulled in from your blog post if it’s included before the Read More Separator in the post itself. As such, you’ll need to add your alt text to the image in the post (not the email) and choose compelling images for your posts as you’re writing them. The good news is this is not only a best practice for email, but also for the social shareability of your blog content in general.11) “Read More” Call-to-ActionWe know every effective marketing email has a clear call-to-action (CTA), so how does this translate to your blog subscriber emails? Well, if you’re main goal is to drive subscribers back to your website where they can read the article you’re emailing about (and hopefully other articles), make sure that next step is crystal clear!After your post preview, include a call-to-action for recipients to read the full article on your blog. Experiment with the copy of this text link to see what generates more clickthroughs, and if your software allows, try a more prominent button CTA instead.(Tip for HubSpot COS Users: You can use HTML to display your “Read More” CTA copy more prominently, using styling like bolded text or headers.)12) Secondary CTAsThis begs the question — should you include any secondary CTAs in your blog subscriber emails? What about a CTA promoting an offer relevant to the content of the post? You know, for lead generation? To be honest, this depends on your particular goals and the type of secondary CTA you plan to use.If the goal of your blog subscriber emails is to drive traffic to your blog, then it’d probably be wise to forego any competing CTAs that might interfere. If your goal is to use these emails as another source of lead generation, feel free to experiment with secondary lead gen CTAs.For HubSpot’s own blog subscriber emails, our main goal is to drive subscribers back to our blog, so we chose to exclude lead gen CTAs. However, we do include a CTA for subscribers to download our free Newsstand app, enabling them to read our blog content optimized for their iPad — a complementary, but not competing offer.You’ll also notice that our “update your email preferences or subscribe to other sections” anchor text link is a CTA in and of itself. We have this there as a way to make sure subscribers know their options, save them from unsubscribing, and promote the other sections on our blog.  13) Social Media Follow Buttons Not every post you email is going to tickle your subscribers’ fancy. Maybe your blog is about unicorn care, and one of your subscribers is already an expert unicorn dietician. While your introductory post about unicorn diet may not be something she feels is worth the read, that doesn’t mean she has to go away empty-handed.For instance, is she following your company on Twitter yet? How about Facebook? A form of secondary CTAs, social media follow buttons are a great way to engage and nurture blog subscribers in other channels, and increase your overall social reach. Configure these buttons for the social networks in which your company actively maintains a presence.14) Footer Last but not least, customize your email’s footer. The most critical component of your footer is CAN-SPAM compliancy, so be sure to include your company’s physical mailing address and a clear unsubscribe link.You can also use your footer as an opportunity to save a few unsubscribes by reminding subscribers that they can always modify their current email preferences if they’re receiving too much email.HubSpot’s new blog subscriber emails enable you to offer subscription via an instant, daily, weekly, or monthly frequency, so if instant emails are overwhelming your subscribers, you’ll want them to know they have other frequency options before choosing to unsubscribe altogether.How else can you customize — and optimize — your blog subscriber emails? Share your tips in the comments!  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email Lists and Segmentation Topics:last_img read more

30-Day Blog Challenge Tip #5: Use Bulleted Lists

first_imgYou’ve probably heard how paramount blogging is to the success of your marketing. But it’s important that you learn how to start a blog and write blog posts for it so that each article supports your business.Without a blog, your SEO can tank, you’ll have nothing to promote in social media, you’ll have no clout with your leads and customers, and you’ll have fewer pages to put those valuable calls-to-action that generate inbound leads.So why, oh why, does almost every marketer I talk to have a laundry list of excuses for why they can’t consistently blog?Maybe because, unless you’re one of the few people who actually like writing, business blogging kind of stinks. You have to find words, string them together into sentences … ugh, where do you even start?Download 6 Free Blog Post Templates NowWell my friend, the time for excuses is over.What Is a Blog?A blog is literally short for “web log.” Blogs began in the early 1990s as an online journal for individuals to publish thoughts and stories on their own website. Bloggers then share their blog posts with other internet users. Blog posts used to be much more personal to the writer or group of writers than they are today.Today, people and organizations of all walks of life manage blogs to share analyses, instruction, criticisms, and other observations of an industry in which they are a rising expert.After you read this post, there will be absolutely no reason you can’t blog every single day — and do it quickly. Not only am I about to provide you with a simple blog post formula to follow, but I’m also going to give you free templates for creating five different types of blog posts:The How-To PostThe List-Based PostThe Curated Collection PostThe SlideShare Presentation PostThe Newsjacking PostWith all this blogging how-to, literally anyone can blog as long as they truly know the subject matter they’re writing about. And since you’re an expert in your industry, there’s no longer any reason you can’t sit down every day and hammer out an excellent blog post.Want to learn how to apply blogging and other forms of content marketing to your business? Check out HubSpot Academy’s free content marketing training resource page. Free Templates: How to Write a Blog Post Tell us a little about yourself below to gain access today: How to Write a Blog Post1. Understand your audience.Before you start to write your first blog post, have a clear understanding of your target audience. What do they want to know about? What will resonate with them? This is where creating your buyer personas comes in handy. Consider what you know about your buyer personas and their interests while you’re coming up with a topic for your blog post.For instance, if your readers are millennials looking to start their own business, you probably don’t need to provide them with information about getting started in social media — most of them already have that down. You might, however, want to give them information about how to adjust their approach to social media from a more casual, personal one to a more business-savvy, networking-focused approach. That kind of tweak is what separates you from blogging about generic stuff to the stuff your audience really wants (and needs) to hear.Don’t have buyer personas in place for your business? Here are a few resources to help you get started:Create Buyer Personas for Your Business [Free Template]Blog Post: How to Create Detailed Buyer Personas for Your BusinessMakeMyPersona.com [Free Tool] 2. Create your blog domain.Next, you’ll need a place to host this and every other blog post you write. This requires choosing a content management system (CMS) and a website domain hosting service.Sign Up With a Content Management SystemA CMS helps you create a website domain where you’ll actually publish your blog. The CMS platforms available for you to sign up for can manage domains, where you create your own website; and subdomains, where you create a webpage that connects with an existing website.HubSpot customers host their website content through HubSpot’s content management system. Another popular option is a self-hosted WordPress website on WP Engine. Whether they create a domain or a subdomain to start their blog, they’ll need to choose a web domain hosting service after choosing their CMS.This is true for every blogger seeking to start their own blog on their own website.Register a Domain or Subdomain With a Website HostYour own blog domain will look like this: www.yourblog.com. The name between the two periods is up to you, as long as this domain name doesn’t yet exist on the internet.Want to create a subdomain for your blog? If you already own a cooking business at www.yourcompany.com, you might create a blog that looks like this: blog.yourcompany.com. In other words, your blog’s subdomain will live in its own section of yourcompany.com.Some CMSs offer subdomains as a free service, where your blog lives on the CMS, rather than your business’s website. For example, it might look like “yourblog.contentmanagementsystem.com.” However, in order to create a subdomain that belongs to a company website, you’ll need to register this subdomain with a website host.Most website hosting services charge very little to host an original domain — in fact, website costs can be as inexpensive as $3 per month. Here are five popular web hosting services to choose from:GoDaddyHostGatorDreamHostBluehostiPage3. Customize your blog’s theme.Once you have your blog domain set up, customize the appearance of your blog to reflect the theme of the content you plan on creating.Are you writing about sustainability and the environment? Green might be a color to keep in mind when designing the look and feel of your blog, as green is often associated with sustainability.If you already manage a website, and are writing your first blog post for that website, it’s important that your blog is consistent with this existing website, both in appearance and subject matter. Two things to include right away are:Logo. This can be your name or your business’s logo, either one helping to remind your readers who or what is publishing this content. How heavily you want to brand this blog, in relation to your main brand, is up to you.”About” page. You might already have an “About” blurb describing yourself or your business. Your blog’s “About” section is an extension of this higher-level statement. Think of it as your blog’s mission statement, which serves to support your company’s goals.4. Identify your first blog post’s topic.Before you even write anything, you need to pick a topic for your blog post. The topic can be pretty general to start with. For example, if you’re a plumber, you might start out thinking you want to write about leaky faucets.Then, as you do your research, you can expand the topic to discuss how to fix a leaky faucet based on the various causes of a faucet leak.You might not want to jump right into a “how-to” article for your first blog post, though, and that’s okay. Perhaps you’d like to write about modern types of faucet setups, or tell one particular success story you had rescuing a faucet before it flooded someone’s house.If a plumber’s first how-to article is about how to fix a leaky faucet, for example, here are four other types of sample blog post ideas a plumber might start with, based on the five free blog templates we’ve offered to you:List-based Post: 5 ways to fix a leaky faucetCurated Collection Post: 10 faucet and sink brands you should look into todaySlideShare Presentation: 5 types of faucets that should replace your old one (with pictures)News post: New study shows X% of people don’t replace their faucet on timeFind more examples of blog posts at the end of this step-by-step guide.If you’re having trouble coming up with topic ideas, check out this blog post from my colleague Ginny Soskey. In this post, Soskey walks through a helpful process for turning one idea into many. Similar to the “leaky faucet” examples above, she suggests that you “iterate off old topics to come up with unique and compelling new topics.” This can be done by:Changing the topic scopeAdjusting the time frameChoosing a new audienceTaking a positive/negative approachIntroducing a new format5. Come up with a working title.Then you might come up with a few different working titles — in other words, iterations or different ways of approaching that topic to help you focus your writing. For example, you might decide to narrow your topic to “Tools for Fixing Leaky Faucets” or “Common Causes of Leaky Faucets.” A working title is specific and will guide your post so you can start writing.Let’s take a real post as an example: “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.” Appropriate, right? The topic, in this case, was probably simply “blogging.” Then the working title may have been something like, “The Process for Selecting a Blog Post Topic.” And the final title ended up being “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.”See that evolution from topic, to working title, to final title? Even though the working title may not end up being the final title (more on that in a moment), it still provides enough information so you can focus your blog post on something more specific than a generic, overwhelming topic.6. Write an intro (and make it captivating).We’ve written more specifically about writing captivating introductions in the post, “How to Write an Introduction,” but let’s review, shall we?First, grab the reader’s attention. If you lose the reader in the first few paragraphs — or even sentences — of the introduction, they will stop reading even before they’ve given your post a fair shake. You can do this in a number of ways: tell a story or a joke, be empathetic, or grip the reader with an interesting fact or statistic.Then describe the purpose of the post and explain how it will address a problem the reader may be having. This will give the reader a reason to keep reading and give them a connection to how it will help them improve their work/lives. Here’s an example of a post that we think does a good job of attracting a reader’s attention right away:7. Organize your content in an outline.Sometimes, blog posts can have an overwhelming amount of information — for the reader and the writer. The trick is to organize the info so readers are not intimidated by the length or amount of content. The organization can take multiple forms — sections, lists, tips, whatever’s most appropriate. But it must be organized!Let’s take a look at the post, “How to Use Snapchat: A Detailed Look Into HubSpot’s Snapchat Strategy.” There is a lot of content in this post, so we broke it into a few different sections using the following headers: How to Setup Your Snapchat Account, Snaps vs. Stories: What’s the Difference?, and How to Use Snapchat for Business. These sections are then separated into sub-sections that to go into more detail and also make the content easier to read.To complete this step, all you really need to do is outline your post. That way, before you start writing, you know which points you want to cover, and the best order in which to do it. To make things even easier, you can also download and use our free blog post templates, which are pre-organized for five of the most common blog post types. Just fill in the blanks!8. Write your blog post!The next step — but not the last — is actually writing the content. We couldn’t forget about that, of course.Now that you have your outline/template, you’re ready to fill in the blanks. Use your outline as a guide and be sure to expand on all of your points as needed. Write about what you already know, and if necessary, do additional research to gather more information, examples, and data to back up your points, providing proper attribution when incorporating external sources. Need help finding accurate and compelling data to use in your post? Check out this roundup of sources — from Pew Research to Google Trends.If you find you’re having trouble stringing sentences together, you’re not alone. Finding your “flow” can be really challenging for a lot of folks. Luckily, there are a ton of tools you can lean on to help you improve your writing. Here are a few to get you started:Power Thesaurus: Stuck on a word? Power Thesaurus is a crowdsourced tool that provides users with a ton of alternative word choices from a community of writers.ZenPen: If you’re having trouble staying focused, check out this distraction-free writing tool. ZenPen creates a minimalist “writing zone” that’s designed to help you get words down without having to fuss with formatting right away.Cliché Finder: Feeling like your writing might be coming off a little cheesy? Identify instances where you can be more specific using this handy cliché tool.For a complete list of tools for improving your writing skills, check out this post. And if you’re looking for more direction, the following resources are chock-full of valuable writing advice:The Marketer’s Pocket Guide to Writing Well [Free Ebook]How to Write Compelling Copy: 7 Tips for Writing Content That ConvertsHow to Write With Clarity: 9 Tips for Simplifying Your MessageThe Kurt Vonnegut Guide to Great Copywriting: 8 Rules That Apply to AnyoneYour Blog Posts Are Boring: 9 Tips for Making Your Writing More InterestingThe Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Successful Blog in 20199. Edit/proofread your post, and fix your formatting.You’re not quite done yet, but you’re close! The editing process is an important part of blogging — don’t overlook it. Ask a grammar-conscious co-worker to copy, edit, and proofread your post, and consider enlisting the help of The Ultimate Editing Checklist (or try using a free grammar checker, like the one developed by Grammarly). And if you’re looking to brush up on your own self-editing skills, turn to these helpful posts for some tips and tricks to get you started:Confessions of a HubSpot Editor: 11 Editing Tips From the TrenchesHow to Become a More Efficient Editor: 12 Ways to Speed Up the Editorial Process10 Simple Edits That’ll Instantly Improve Any Piece of WritingWhen you’re ready to check your formatting, keep the following advice in mind …Featured ImageMake sure you choose a visually appealing and relevant image for your post. As social networks treat content with images more prominently, visuals are now more responsible than ever for the success of your blog content in social media. In fact, it’s been shown that content with relevant images receives 94% more views than content without relevant images.For help selecting an image for your post, read “How to Select the Perfect Image for Your Next Blog Post” — and pay close attention to the section about copyright law.Visual AppearanceNo one likes an ugly blog post. And it’s not just pictures that make a post visually appealing — it’s the formatting and organization of the post, too.In a properly formatted and visually appealing blog post, you’ll notice that header and sub-headers are used to break up large blocks of text — and those headers are styled consistently. Here’s an example of what that looks like:Also, screenshots should always have a similar, defined border (see screenshot above for example) so they don’t appear as if they’re floating in space. And that style should stay consistent from post to post.Maintaining this consistency makes your content (and your brand) look more professional, and makes it easier on the eyes.Topics/TagsTags are specific, public-facing keywords that describe a post. They also allow readers to browse for more content in the same category on your blog. Refrain from adding a laundry list of tags to each post. Instead, put some thought into a tagging strategy. Think of tags as “topics” or “categories,” and choose 10-20 tags that represent all the main topics you want to cover on your blog. Then stick to those.10. Insert a call-to-action (CTA) at the end.At the end of every blog post, you should have a CTA that indicates what you want the reader to do next — subscribe to your blog, download an ebook, register for a webinar or event, read a related article, etc. Typically, you think about the CTA being beneficial for the marketer. Your visitors read your blog post, they click on the CTA, and eventually you generate a lead. But the CTA is also a valuable resource for the person reading your content — use your CTAs to offer more content similar to the subject of the post they just finished reading.In the blog post, “What to Post on Instagram: 18 Photo & Video Ideas to Spark Inspiration,” for instance, readers are given actionable ideas for creating valuable Instagram content. At the end of the post is a CTA referring readers to download a comprehensive guide on how to use Instagram for business:See how that’s a win-win for everyone? Readers who want to learn more have the opportunity to do so, and the business receives a lead they can nurture … who may even become a customer! Learn more about how to choose the right CTA for every blog post in this article. And check out this collection of clever CTAs to inspire your own efforts.11. Optimize for on-page SEO.After you finish writing, go back and optimize your post for search.Don’t obsess over how many keywords to include. If there are opportunities to incorporate keywords you’re targeting, and it won’t impact reader experience, do it. If you can make your URL shorter and more keyword-friendly, go for it. But don’t cram keywords or shoot for some arbitrary keyword density — Google’s smarter than that!Here’s a little reminder of what you can and should look for:Meta DescriptionMeta descriptions are the descriptions below the post’s page title on Google’s search results pages. They provide searchers with a short summary of the post before clicking into it. They are ideally between 150-160 characters and start with a verb, such as “Learn,” “Read,” or “Discover.” While meta descriptions no longer factor into Google’s keyword ranking algorithm, they do give searchers a snapshot of what they will get by reading the post and can help improve your clickthrough rate from search.Page Title and HeadersMost blogging software uses your post title as your page title, which is the most important on-page SEO element at your disposal. But if you’ve followed our formula so far, you should already have a working title that will naturally include keywords/phrases your target audience is interested in. Don’t over-complicate your title by trying to fit keywords where they don’t naturally belong. That said, if there are clear opportunities to add keywords you’re targeting to your post title and headers, feel free to take them. Also, try to keep your headlines short — ideally, under 65 characters — so they don’t get truncated in search engine results.Anchor TextAnchor text is the word or words that link to another page — either on your website or on another website. Carefully select which keywords you want to link to other pages on your site, because search engines take that into consideration when ranking your page for certain keywords.It’s also important to consider which pages you link to. Consider linking to pages that you want to rank well for that keyword. You could end up getting it to rank on Google’s first page of results instead of its second page, and that ain’t small potatoes.Mobile OptimizationWith mobile devices now accounting for nearly 2 out of every 3 minutes spent online, having a website that is responsive or designed for mobile has become more and more critical. In addition to making sure your website’s visitors (including your blog’s visitors) have the best experience possible, optimizing for mobile will score your website some SEO points.Back in 2015, Google made a change to its algorithm that now penalizes sites that aren’t mobile optimized. This month (May 2016), Google rolled out their second version of the mobile-friendly algorithm update — creating a sense of urgency for the folks that have yet to update their websites. To make sure your site is getting the maximum SEO benefit possible, check out this free guide: How to Make a Mobile-Friendly Website: SEO Tips for a Post-“Mobilegeddon” World.12. Pick a catchy title.Last but not least, it’s time to spruce up that working title of yours. Luckily, we have a simple formula for writing catchy titles that will grab the attention of your reader. Here’s what to consider:Start with your working title.As you start to edit your title, keep in mind that it’s important to keep the title accurate and clear.Then, work on making your title sexy — whether it’s through strong language, alliteration, or another literary tactic.If you can, optimize for SEO by sneaking some keywords in there (only if it’s natural, though!).Finally, see if you can shorten it at all. No one likes a long, overwhelming title — and remember, Google prefers 65 characters or fewer before it truncates it on its search engine results pages.If you’ve mastered the steps above, learn about some way to take your blog posts to the next level in this post. Want some real examples of blog posts? See what your first blog post can look like, below, based on the topic you choose and the audience you’re targeting.Blog Post ExamplesList-Based PostThought Leadership PostCurated Collection PostSlideshare PresentationNewsjacking PostInfographic PostHow-to Post Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Hi 👋 What’s your name?First NameLast NameHi null, what’s your email address?Email AddressAnd your phone number?Phone NumberWhat is your company’s name and website?CompanyWebsiteHow many employees work there?1Does your company provide any of the following services?Web DesignOnline MarketingSEO/SEMAdvertising Agency ServicesYesNoGet Your Free Templates 1. List-Based PostExample: 10 Fresh Ways to Get Better Results From Your Blog PostsList-based posts are sometimes called “listicles,” a mix of the words “list” and “article.” These are articles that deliver information in the form of a list. A listicle uses subheaders to break down the blog post into individual pieces, helping readers skim and digest your content more easily. According to ClearVoice, listicles are among the most shared types of content on social media across 14 industries.As you can see in the example from our blog, above, listicles can offer various tips and methods for solving a problem.2. Thought Leadership PostExample: What I Wish I Had Known Before Writing My First BookThought leadership blog posts allow you to indulge in your expertise on a particular subject matter and share firsthand knowledge with your readers. These pieces — which can be written in the first person, like the post by Joanna Penn, shown above — help you build trust with your audience so people take your blog seriously as you continue to write for it.3. Curated Collection PostExample: 8 Examples of Evolution in ActionCurated collections are a special type of listicle blog post (the first blog post example, described above). But rather than sharing tips or methods of doing something, this type of blog post shares a list of real examples that all have something in common, in order to prove a larger point. In the example post above, Listverse shares eight real examples of evolution in action among eight different animals — starting with the peppered moth.4. Slideshare PresentationExample: The HubSpot Culture CodeSlideshare is a presentation tool owned by the social network, LinkedIn, that helps publishers package a lot of information into easily shareable slides. Think of it like a PowerPoint, but for the web. With this in mind, Slideshare blog posts help you promote your Slideshare so that it can generate a steady stream of visitors.Unlike blogs, Slideshare decks don’t often rank well on search engines, so they need a platform for getting their message out there to the people who are looking for it. By embedding and summarizing your Slideshare on a blog post, you can share a great deal of information and give it a chance to rank on Google at the same time.Need some Slideshare ideas? In the example above, we turned our company’s “Culture Code” into a Slideshare presentation that anyone can look through and take lessons from, and promoted it through a blog post.5. Newsjacking PostExample: Ivy Goes Mobile With New App for Designers”Newsjacking” is a nickname for “hijacking” your blog to break important news related to your industry. Therefore, the newsjack post is a type of article whose sole purpose is to garner consumers’ attention and, while offering them timeless professional advice, also prove your blog to be a trusted resource for learning about the big things that happen in your industry.The newsjack example above was published by Houzz, a home decor merchant and interior design resource, about a new mobile app that launched just for interior designers. Houzz didn’t launch the app, but the news of its launching is no less important to Houzz’s audience.6. Infographic PostExample: The Key Benefits of Studying Online [Infographic]The infographic post serves a similar purpose as the Slideshare post — the fourth example, explained above — in that it conveys information for which plain blog copy might not be the best format. For example, when you’re looking to share a lot of statistical information (without boring or confusing your readers), building this data into a well-designed, even fun-looking infographic can help keep your readers engaged with your content. It also helps readers remember the information long after they leave your website.7. How-to PostExample: How to Write a Blog Post: A Step-by-Step GuideFor our last example, you need not look any further than the blog post you’re reading right now! How-to guides like this one help solve a problem for your readers. They’re like a cookbook for your industry, walking your audience through a project step by step to improve their literacy on the subject. The more posts like this you create, the more equipped your readers will be to work with you and invest in the services you offer.Ready to blog? Don’t forget to download your six free blog post templates right here. Free Blog Post Templates Originally published May 6, 2019 7:30:00 PM, updated October 25 2019last_img read more

Your Top Questions on “Social Selling” Answered by LinkedIn, Evernote, and HubSpot

first_img Originally published Feb 20, 2014 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Koka Sexton, LinkedIn Koka Sexton, LinkedIn “When it comes to the tools needed, I think it’s important for sales professionals to be as visible as possible within every social network that their customers may be a part of. That’s what social selling is all about. Obviously LinkedIn works well for that, because it’s a professional network, but it may be Twitter or other networks as well.I think this is why what HubSpot and Evernote said about how marketing and sales can be aligned is so important. Mark put it best when he said, “There is no social selling without content.” And so to salespeople, I would say that you need to hold your marketing professionals accountable by providing you with the right content that’s in the right context for your buyers.I think context is something that’s often overlooked because where the buyer is within the sales cycle should determine what type of content you’re handing them, and ultimately how you’re delivering it to them. If email open rates are low, then why not try posting something in your social stream so you can feed your prospects the information they need at the time that they need it?” “When it comes to sales and marketing, I think it’s helpful to make sure there’s an open channel of communication so that collaboration can occur. So if a salesperson is talking to people on the phone and they know that they’re not able to send their prospects the right materials to close the sale or move things along, marketing needs to know that information.That’s a sign that there needs to be more collaboration between sales and marketing to make sure the salespeople have the sales tools and materials that they need to close deals. And vice versa – communication goes in both directions. If marketing feels that they’re out of the loop when it comes to what customers are thinking or saying or what their actual questions are, it’s definitely worth it to have more involvement with sales.” Mark Roberge, HubSpot Josh Zerkel, Evernote “There could be a couple of things going on. Sales might not be aware where the tools are or it may be that they feel it’s too difficult to access them. That’s why it’s critical to keep your content in a shared spot where it’s really easy to access and where salespeople feel comfortable.The other thing that might be happening is that the tools that marketing thinks are so awesome may not, in fact, be so awesome when it comes to real world deployment and social selling. So it’s probably worth it at this point, if sales isn’t using the tools that are being deployed, to have an in-depth conversation about what is really needed, what are people asking for, and then go back to marketing and share those findings.” Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social Selling “Sales professionals, and really every professional, need to understand that their LinkedIn profile is not their online resume. They simply need to take themselves out of that frame of mind. Your LinkedIn page is really your online brand, your professional profile.So salespeople need to use their LinkedIn accounts as a resource, and not a resume. Internally at LinkedIn, we call that ‘Resume to Reputation.’ It’s really about the transformation in how you use your online persona, building your reputation and becoming that brand that draws people in.This is where marketing can come in, too. If a salesperson is consistently posting great content about the industry, provided by the marketing team, it will be so much easier for that salesperson to build that personal brand and that social media credibility. That’s really what social selling is all about: Giving salespeople the tools they need to have genuine interactions on social media that help them in their sales processes.Next Step: The 3 C’s of Social SellingWith these core questions answered, feel free to check out the presentation deck from the webinar that prompted this discussion below. If you’d like to listen to the webinar recording for the full experience, just click here. This post originally appeared on the Sales section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe here.Social selling — it’s not just a buzzword anymore. It’s a crucial part of how successful sales teams communicate with their prospects. That’s why last week, HubSpot, LinkedIn, and Evernote hosted a webinar to discuss how organizations can align their sales and marketing teams to develop the tools that make social selling work through context, content, and collaboration. Toward the end of the session, three critical and common questions were asked that we’d like to address today:My sales team doesn’t have the right materials to help my prospects solve their problems. What should I do?Our marketing team creates a lot of content each month, but the sales team never uses it. How can I solve this problem?How do you present yourself on social media in order to do social selling? How do you leverage your social presence as a salesperson?Responses below come from our speakers: Mark Roberge, chief revenue officer at HubSpot, Koka Sexton, senior social marketing manager at LinkedIn, and Josh Zerkel, user education specialist at Evernote.  Q: My sales team doesn’t have the right materials to help my prospects solve their problems. What should I do? Q: Our marketing team creates a lot of content each month, but the sales team never uses it. How can I solve this problem? “We’ve seen this problem at HubSpot ourselves to the nth degree — it’s actually something we’ve been focusing on with some hacker technology in the HubSpot Sales Labs. As you can imagine, we’re producing boatloads of content that have to do with different problems people have, different industries, different buyer personas.Then, on the other side of the fence, you’ve got sales actually out there talking to different buyers, on social media or via email, in specific industries with specific problems. It’s next to impossible, at this point, for those salespeople to know exactly the right content to follow up with — there’s just too much out there.We’re experimenting with a bunch of different solutions. We’re testing tagging content depending on the topic or persona, and then on the other side, having sales designate problems that different personas are having in our CRM. That way, the system can do some matching.Q: How do you present yourself on social media in order to do social selling? How do you leverage your social presence as a salesperson? Josh Zerkel, Evernotelast_img read more

How to Identify and Remedy Duplicate Content Issues on Your Website

first_img Topics: Technical SEO It’s easy to be fooled into thinking SEO is just about link building. There are so many posts covering the latest developments on what links are good or bad, that we sometimes forget about the huge gains we can make by simply fixing problems with our own site. One of the biggest culprits for lost traffic and rankings is duplicate content. Luckily, you have control over your own site, so you have the power to fix it.Access Now: 22 SEO Myths to Leave Behind This YearWhat Is Duplicate Content?Duplicate content exists when there is more than one version of a page indexed by the search engines. Where there are multiple versions of a page indexed, it’s difficult for search engines to decide what page to show for a relevant search query.Search engines aim to provide users with the best experience possible, which means they will rarely show duplicate pieces of content. Instead, they will be forced to choose what version they feel is the best fit for that query. Causes of Duplicate ContentThree of the biggest offenders for causing duplicate content are:1) URL ParametersURLs can often contain additional parameters because of how they are being tracked (marketing campaign IDs, analytics IDs), or the CMS a website is using adds its own custom parameters.For example, the following URLs could all lead to the same page:http://www.example.com/page1http://www.example.com/page1?source=organichttp://www.example.com/page1?campaignid=35322) Printer friendly pagesOften a web page will have an option to produce a printer friendly version of that page. This can often lead to duplicate content issues. For example, the following URLs would lead to the same page.http://www.example.com/page1http://www.example.com/printer/page13) Session IDsSites may often want to track a user’s session across their website. For example, sites can offer personalized features based upon who that user is and their past interactions with the site, or an ecommerce store may remember what that person added to their shopping cart on their last visit.Session ids get appended to the URL and this causes duplicate versions of a page to exist. For example, the following URLs would lead to the same page.http://www.example.com/page1http://www.example.com/page1?sessionid=12455Duplicate Content ProblemsThe biggest issues caused by duplicate content are:Search engines don’t know which version of the page they should indexSearch engines don’t know what page the link authority should be assigned to, or if it should be divided across multiple versions.Search engines don’t know what version of the page to rank for a relevant search query.This can result in web pages losing both rankings and organic traffic.Finding Duplicate ContentThere are two tools you can use to find duplicate content problems for your site: Google Webmaster Tools and Screaming Frog.1) Google Webmaster ToolsUsing Google Webmaster Tools you can easily find pages with both duplicate titles and meta descriptions. You simply click on “HTML Improvements” under “Search Appearance”.Clicking on one of these links will show you what pages have duplicate meta descriptions and page titles. 2) Screaming FrogYou can download the screaming frog web crawler and use it to crawl 500 pages for free. This application lets you do a lot of different things, including finding duplicate content problems.Page Titles/Meta Descriptions You can find duplicate page titles by simply clicking on the tab “Page Titles” or “Meta Description” and filtering for “Duplicate.”URLsYou can also find pages that have multiple URL versions by simply clicking on the “URL” tab and sorting by “Duplicate.”For a complete guide on all the different things you can do with Screaming Frog, check out this post from SeerInteractive.Fixing Duplicate ContentDuplicate content is a problem that can impact both your organic traffic and web rankings, but it’s something that you can easily fix. The three quickest ways to address duplicate content problems are:1) Canonical Tag Using the canonical tag you can tell search engines what version of a page you want to return for relevant search queries. The canonical tag is found in the header of a web page.The canonical tag is the best approach when you want to have multiple versions of a page available to users. If you’re using the HubSpot COS, this will be taken care of automatically, so no manual labor required.2) 301 RedirectA 301 redirect will redirect all legacy pages to a new URL. It tells Google to pass all the link authority from these pages to the new URL and to rank that URL for relevant search queries.The 301 redirect is the best option when you don’t have any need for multiple versions of a page to be available.3) Meta Tags You can use meta tags to tell search engines not to index a particular page.Meta tags work best when you want that page to be available to the user but not indexed, e.g. terms and conditions. Duplicate content is a real problem for sites, but one that can be easily solved using the advice above. If you want to learn more about duplicate content, watch this video series from the SEO experts at Dejan SEO on how you can fix it for your site. Originally published Mar 10, 2014 4:00:00 AM, updated August 27 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

A Simple Guide to Optimizing Your Landing Pages [Infographic]

first_img Landing Page Optimization Writing and designing a valuable offer is only the first step of getting leads out of that offer — next, you’ve got to set up landing pages so you can actually get those leads. That’s why it’s so critical to make sure your landing pages are properly optimized. Every tweak you make, big or small, could have a huge impact on the number of visitors that convert to leads.So how do you actually optimize your page? Which parts should you choose to change up to get the best results (the headline, the form, the copy itself, etc.)?Never fear: This infographic from the folks at QuickSprout sets out to answer these very questions. In it, you’ll learn the nine elements of high converting landing page design, how to maximize SEO and usability, and how to test effectiveness and calculate ROI.473Save Originally published Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated August 08 2017 473SaveWant to learn more about optimizing landing pages for lead generation? Check out our free ebook on landing page optimization.center_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Evoke Emotion on Your Landing Pages (Without Going Overboard)

first_imgEmotion is a major force in online sales. As much as we tend to disparage “emotion” in purchasing decisions, the fact is everyone thinks and makes choices based on emotion.We can’t prevent this. Emotional decision-making is hardwired into our brain’s functionality. In fact, without guidance from our emotions, decision-making would be nearly impossible.Not only is it appropriate to use emotion in your landing page, but it’s essential for the decision-making process. That being said, you don’t want to go overboard. In this post, I want to show you is how you can use emotion in the most effective way in your landing pages.Know your audience’s emotional needs.The first step to using emotion in a landing page is discovering the emotions that will make a difference in your audience’s actions (assuming that you already know who your customers are). Every purchase and conversion is a driven by the customer’s emotional need.If you are selling arthritis relief cream, your customer’s emotional needs are for relief.If you are providing consulting services for office organization, then your customer’s emotional needs are for control or stress relief.If you design outdoor living spaces, then your customers want relaxation or enjoyment or respect from their neighbors.There are a basic set of human needs and desires. All you need to do is identify which of these emotional needs your customers have. Then, you use the techniques described below to tap into those emotional needs on your landing pages.Use images of people.As a general rule, pictures have the most power in affecting emotion. But what types of pictures are the most emotionally powerful?Pictures of people. We are drawn to such pictures because we can identify with the person in the picture. We see emotion in their eyes and in their faces and in their body language. In a way that is both immediate and unavoidable, our emotions are affected by what we see.Image from reddit. Landing pages that use pictures of people can affect the emotions, too — perhaps not in a tear-jerking way, but at least in such a way that the user will feel something. And because of that feeling, they decide to convert.Pictures of people are remarkably effective. Usually, these people are expressing an emotion that the user is supposed to feel.eHarmony uses a picture of two people who are obviously in love. The user, looking at this picture, may also feel the pangs of romantic emotions, and then want to look for a match.Evernote’s landing page pictures a woman who looks confident, organized, and in control. These are emotions that Evernote users-to-be may want to feel, too.This isn’t just some psychological gimmick. Humans tend to mirror one another’s attitudes and actions. When you look at images of someone who is exhibiting a certain emotion, you will experience that same emotion to some extent, too.Use colors that cause the right emotion.Color plays a major role in our emotions. Over 20 years ago, studies found that children with violent tendencies will relax and calm down when placed in a pink room. Hospital researchers have discovered that replacing blue-tinted lighting with gold-tinted lighting makes medical staff feel soothed. More recently, researchers have also found that creative inspiration comes more often to people who work in rooms that are painted blue.Color affects our attitudes, emotions, and actions. It’s most powerful effect, however, is on the emotions, which in turn affect our actions. Conversioner’s color wheel outlines some of the ways in which we are affected by the colors we see.Image from Conversioner.comI’ve strategically selected an orange color scheme on part of my site’s landing page. It’s an upbeat, attention-grabbing color. I’m looking to partner with optimistic visionaries, and this color is exactly what I need.You’ll improve the emotional connectedness of your landing pages if you use a color scheme that brings out the emotion that you want your users to experience.Focus on benefits to provide gratification.Users want benefits. They already know what they need, how much it’s going to cost, and where to find it. What will tip the scales in their decision? It’s the benefits of the product or service that you are selling.To be emotionally effective, landing pages should be benefit-heavy and solution-light. Mention the solution only to inform users about what product or service you are selling. Focus on the benefits in order to connect most directly with their emotions.Listing benefits is exactly what Pampers does in their diaper landing page. They give you a whole list of benefits. Notice how the language itself has emotional overtones — “comfort,” and “protection.” Every child’s caregiver wants her child to be comforted and protected. These words, loaded with emotion, will help encourage a conversion.Remind users of the pain to cause emotional avoidance.Pain and emotion are closely connected. They share a common brain processing center, the cingulate cortex, and work in conjunction to tell the body how to behave in response.We tend to respond to pain and pleasure with a far greater amount of emotional involvement than we do, say, to a more “objective” or non-urgent decision, such as whether to go to Olive Garden or Carrabba’s for dinner.Pain demands immediate alleviation.I need to go to the bathroomI’m going to have this babyI need to find a more comfortable chairI need to get the spiders out of my houseI need to get a more reliable vehicleHere’s the thing about pain, though. Someone doesn’t have to feel the pain to experience the same urgency or sensitive response. They only need to be reminded of the pain in a subtle way. When they feel that pain or are reminded of it, they are more likely to act and to convert. Since we’re talking about Carrabba’s, let’s see if they use pain in their landing page. They do — it’s a subtle and understated example of what a might pain reminder might be. In this page, they simply show a picture of food. This, however, may signal my pain receptors to the fact that I am hungry and need satiation.LifeLock wants their users to feel a little bit of the fear of losing their identity, so they subtly introduce this pain into their landing page. And here’s another. InsureMyTrip uses the term “worry-free.” Even words with a negative emotional response can be used in such a way that makes them appealing, and serves the goal of the landing page.Words have emotional power. Choose them carefully, and use them wisely.ConclusionDon’t miss the importance of emotion. Jim Joseph, a contributor to Entrepreneur, wrote “A very important element to marketing that too many entrepreneurs overlook is finding your emotional benefit.”Emotion is too powerful to overlook. Emotion underlies everything we do. You users need to not only see and understand what you are providing, but they need to feel it, too. Those feelings are what will cause them to convert.How do you use emotion in your landing pages? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Don’t simply present the user with pain. Show them the pain, then present your product or service as the solution to that pain.Use emotionally loaded words.Specific words have emotional power. Using emotional words brings out the emotional power in your landing page.Here’s how to use emotionally loaded words. Simply identify the emotion that you are targeting, then use words that elicit those emotions. This list of emotional words from PsychPage.com will help you identify the right words.It’s important not to overdo it with emotional words. As powerful as they may be, they lose power with overuse.Here’s an example of not overdoing it. This landing page for Aruba vacations uses the word “happy,” a clear emotional marker that is designed to elicit a response: Originally published Dec 4, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Emotion in Marketinglast_img read more

Running an Email A/B Test? How to Determine Your Sample Size & Testing Time Frame

first_img4) Click “Calculate.”5) Your sample size will spit out. Ta-da! The calculator will spit out your sample size. In our example, our sample size is: 274.This is the size one of your variations needs to be. So for your email send, if you have one control and one variation, you’ll need to double this number. If you had a control and two variations, you’d triple it. (And so on.)6) Depending on your email program, you may need to calculate the sample size’s percentage of the whole email.HubSpot customers, I’m looking at you for this section. When you’re running an email A/B test, you’ll need to select the percentage of contacts to send the list to — not just the raw sample size. To do that, you need to divide the number in your sample by the total number of contacts in your list. Here’s what that math looks like, using the example numbers above:274 / 1000 = 27.4%This means that each sample (both your control AND your variation) needs to be sent to 27-28% of your audience — in other words, roughly a total of 55% of your total list.And that’s it! You should be ready to select your sending time. How to Choose the Right Time Frame for Your A/B TestOkay, so this is where we get into the reality of email sending: You have to figure out how long to run your email A/B test before sending a (winning) version on to the rest of your list. Figuring out the timing aspect is a little less statistically driven, but you should definitely use past data to help you make better decisions. Here’s how you can do that.If you don’t have timing restrictions on when to send the winning email to the rest of the list, head over to your analytics. Figure out when your email opens/clicks (or whatever your success metrics are) starts to drop off. Look your past email sends to figure this out. For example, what percentage of total clicks did you get in your first day? If you found that you get 70% of your clicks in the first 24 hours, and then 5% each day after that, it’d make sense to cap your email A/B testing timing window for 24 hours because it wouldn’t be worth delaying your results just to gather a little bit of extra data. In this scenario, you would probably want to keep your timing window to 24 hours, and at the end of 24 hours, your email program should let you know if they can determine a statistically significant winner.Then, it’s up to you what to do next. If you have a large enough sample size and found a statistically significant winner at the end of the testing time frame, many email marketing programs will automatically and immediately send the winning variation. If you have a large enough sample size and there’s no statistically significant winner at the end of the testing time frame, email marketing tools might also allow you to automatically send a variation of your choice.If you have a smaller sample size or are running a 50/50 A/B test, when to send the next email based on the initial email’s results is entirely up to you. If you have time restrictions on when to send the winning email to the rest of the list, figure out how late you can send the winner without it being untimely or affecting other email sends. For example, if you’ve sent an email out at 6 p.m. EST for a flash sale that ends at midnight EST, you wouldn’t want to determine an A/B test winner at 11 p.m. Instead, you’d want to send the email closer to 8 or 9 p.m. — that’ll give the people not involved in the A/B test enough time to act on your email.And that’s pretty much it, folks. After doing these calculations and examining your data, you should be in a much better state to send email A/B tests — ones that are fairly statistically valid and help you actually move the needle in your email marketing. Topics: Originally published Dec 11, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated October 29 2019 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img A/B Testing Do you remember your first A/B test on email? I do. (Nerdy, I know.) I felt simultaneously thrilled and terrified because I knew I had to actually use some of what I learned in college stats for my job. I sat on the cusp of knowing just enough about statistics that it could be dangerous. For instance, I knew that you needed a big enough sample size to run the test on. I knew I needed to run the test long enough to get statistically significant results. I knew I could easily run one if I wanted, using HubSpot’s Email App…. But that’s pretty much it. I wasn’t sure how big was “big enough” for sample sizes and how long was “long enough” for test durations — and Googling it gave me a variety of answers my college stats courses definitely didn’t prepare me for.Turns out I wasn’t alone: Those are two of the most common A/B testing questions we get from customers. And the reason the typical answers from a Google search aren’t that helpful is because they’re talking about A/B testing in an ideal, theoretical, non-marketing world. So, I figured I’d do the research to help answer this question for you in a practical way. At the end of this post, you should be able to know how to determine the right sample size and time frame for your next email send.Download Now: Email Marketing Planning Template Theory vs. Reality of Sample Size and Timing in Email A/B TestsIn theory, to determine a winner between Variation A and Variation B, you need to wait until you have enough results to see if there is a statistically significant difference between the two. Depending on your company, sample size, and how you execute the A/B test, getting statistically significant results could happen in hours or days or weeks — and you’ve just got to stick it out until you get those results. In theory, you should not restrict the time in which you’re gathering results.For many A/B tests, waiting is no problem. Testing headline copy on a landing page? It’s cool to wait a month for results. Same goes with blog CTA creative — you’d be going for the long-term lead gen play, anyway. But on email, waiting can be a problem — for several practical reasons:1) Each email send has a finite audience.Unlike a landing page (where you can continue to gather new audience members over time), once you send an email A/B test off, that’s it — you can’t “add” more people to that A/B test. So you’ve got to figure out how squeeze the most juice out of your emails. This will usually require you to send an A/B test to the smallest portion of your list needed to get statistically significant results, pick a winner, and then send the winning variation on to the rest of the list. 2) Running an email marketing program means you’re juggling at least a few email sends per week. (In reality, probably way more than that.) If you spend too much time collecting results, you could miss out on sending your next email — which could have worse effects than if you sent a non-statistically-significant winner email on to one segment of your database. 3) Email sends are often designed to be timely.Your marketing emails are optimized to deliver at a certain time of day, whether your emails are supporting the timing of a new campaign launch and/or landing in your recipient’s inboxes at a time they’d love to receive it. So if you wait for your email to be fully statistically significant, you might miss out on being timely and relevant — which could defeat the purpose of your email send in the first place. That’s why email A/B testing programs have a “timing” setting built in: At the end of that time frame, if neither result is statistically significant, one variation (which you choose ahead of time) will be sent to the rest of your list. That way, you can still run A/B tests in email, but you can also work around your email marketing scheduling demands and ensure people are always getting timely content.So to run A/B tests in email while still optimizing your sends for the best results, you’ve got to take both sample size and timing into account. Next up: how to actually figure out your sample size and timing using data.How to Actually Determine Your Sample Size and Testing Time FrameAlrighty, now on to the part you’ve been waiting for: how to actually calculate the sample size and timing you need for your next email A/B test. How to Calculate Your Email A/B Test’s Sample SizeLike I mentioned above, each email A/B test you send can only be sent to a finite audience — so you need to figure out how to maximize the results from that A/B test. To do that, you need to figure out the smallest portion of your total list needed to get statistically significant results. Here’s how you calculate it.1) Assess whether you have enough contacts in your list to A/B a sample in the first place.To A/B test a sample of your list, you need to have a decently large list size — at least 1,000 contacts. If you have fewer than that in your list, the proportion of your list that you need to A/B test to get statistically significant results gets larger and larger. For example, to get statistically significant results from a small list, you might have to test 85% or 95% of your list. And the results of the people on your list who haven’t been tested yet will be so small that you might as well have just sent half of your list one email version, and the other half another, and then measured the difference. Your results might not be statistically significant at the end of it all, but at least you’re gathering learnings while you grow your lists to have more than 1,000 contacts. (If you want more tips on growing your email list so you can hit that 1,000 contact threshold, check out this blog post.) Note for HubSpot customers: 1,000 contacts is also our benchmark for running A/B tests on samples of email sends — if you have fewer than 1,000 contacts in your selected list, the A version of your test will automatically be sent to half of your list and the B will be sent to the other half.2) Click here to open up this calculator.Here’s what it looks like when you open it up:3) Put in your email’s Confidence Level, Confidence Interval, and Population into the tool.Yep, that’s a lot of stat jargon. Here’s what these terms translate to in your email:Population: Your sample represents a larger group of people. This larger group is called your population.In email, your population is the typical number of people in your list who get emails delivered to them — not the number of people you sent emails to. To calculate population, I’d look at the past three to five emails you’ve sent to this list, and average the total number of delivered emails. (Use the average when calculating sample size, as the total number of delivered emails will fluctuate.)Confidence Interval: You might have heard this called “margin of error.” Lots of surveys use this, including political polls. This is the range of results you can expect this A/B test to explain once it’s run with the full population. For example, in your emails, if you have an interval of 5, and 60% of your sample opens your Variation, you can be sure that between 55% (60 minus 5) and 65% (60 plus 5) would have also opened that email. The bigger the interval you choose, the more certain you can be that the populations true actions have been accounted for in that interval. At the same time, large intervals will give you less definitive results. It’s a tradeoff you’ll have to make in your emails. For our purposes, it’s not worth getting too caught up in confidence intervals. When you’re just getting started with A/B tests, I’d recommend choosing a smaller interval (ex: around 5).  Confidence Level: This tells you how sure you can be that your sample results lie within the above confidence interval. The lower the percentage, the less sure you can be about the results. The higher the percentage, the more people you’ll need in your sample, too. Note for HubSpot customers: The Email App automatically uses the 85% confidence level to determine a winner. Since that option isn’t available in this tool, I’d suggest choosing 95%. Example:Let’s pretend we’re sending our first A/B test. Our list has 1,000 people in it and has a 95% deliverability rate. We want to be 95% confident our winning email metrics fall within a 5-point interval of our population metrics. Here’s what we’d put in the tool:Population: 950Confidence Level: 95%Confidence Interval: 5last_img read more

The Ingenious Email System That Helped Tim Ferriss Reach Maximum Productivity

first_img Topics: thanks for reaching out! Hey there,Thanks for the email! I just wanted to let you know that going forward, I will only be checking email twice per day. This has nothing to do with you and everything to do with me reaching max productivity. If it’s an emergency, fell free to give me a call. Thanks for understanding. You’re the coolest! – Mike Productivity 4) Stick to your schedule.Sticking to your new schedule is the hardest part of email batching because like any new habit, it takes time to develop. Be sure to reward yourself every day you stay true to your email schedule. For example, I use a cup of coffee as my reward when I check email during peak hours.Improving your productivity starts with identifying your biggest distractions and adjusting. With an average of 121 emails per day to worry about, our inboxes can be our best friend and our worst enemy. By embracing email batching and limiting the time we spend inside our inboxes, we free ourselves up from a tedious task to do more important things.Plan to give this a try? Tell us how it goes in the comments. Originally published Jan 17, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated August 26 2017 This post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Sales Blog. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.What’s the first step to being more productive?Depending on what you do, many different answers might come to mind. For some it might be managing time better, setting a schedule, or creating a to-do list every day. But this isn’t exactly the answer I’m looking for.The first step to being more productive is to understand what causes you to become unproductive.Ask yourself this question right now: What’s my biggest distraction on a daily basis?If you’re like most people, email is the #1 task killing your productivity.According to Radicati, the average businessperson sends and receives a staggering 121 emails a day — and that number is expected to swell to 140 emails per day in two years. Spending time thinking about 121 emails curbs your ability to concentrate on the important tasks you need to accomplish.How should you combat this productivity-killing email overload? I’ll show you. Keep reading.The Ingenious Email System for Avoiding Email OverloadThe answer is easier than you think: Start batching your emails. By reading and responding to your emails only twice a day, you’ll allow yourself time to be productive while simultaneously ensuring you never miss an important note.Entrepreneur Tim Ferriss developed this strategy when he found he wasn’t being as productive as he could be. Instead of accepting email as an unfortunate but unavoidable time suck, Ferriss decided to take action. He figured out that if he only checked email twice per day, and let everyone know that was his plan, his inbox would become a lot more manageable.Turns out, he was right. Here’s how to get started with Ferriss’ email batching system.1) Monitor your email for one day — without responding.By ignoring email for one day and simply monitoring your inbox to see when it’s busiest, you get a clear picture of when you need to check messages. Log into your account once every hour and record how many emails are in your inbox. (Note: Feel free to do this longer than one day to get a larger sample size.)2) Make a note of peak hours.Once you have a baseline number of emails you receive every hour, identify the two hours during the day when your inbox is most active. Do you see a jump from zero emails to 22 at 8 a.m.? Or do a majority of your emails arrive between noon and 1 p.m.? After I observed my inbox for a day, I identified my two peak hours as 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.3) Create a schedule around your peak hours.When you know your two peak hours, rearrange your calendar to check email at those two times — and only those two times. For example, my calendar looks like this: By committing to an email schedule, you free yourself up to focus on the important tasks of your day.Pro tip: If you’re worried you’ll miss out on an important email, take a tip from Ferriss and set up automatic responders. These automated messages will alert the person reaching out to you that you’re only checking email twice a day and if it’s a truly urgent matter to call or contact you through another channel.Here are two templates for your automatic responders. The first is from Ferriss himself, and the second is one I’ve used.only checking email 2x per day Hi all…In an effort to increase productivity and efficiency I am beginning a new personal email policy. I’ve recently realized I spend more time shuffling through my inbox and less time focused on the task at hand. It has become an unnecessary distraction that ultimately creates longer lead times on my ever-growing ‘to do’ list.Going forward I will only be checking/responding to email at 11a and 4p on weekdays. I will try and respond to email in a timely manner without neglecting the needs of our clients and brand identity.If you need an immediate time-sensitive response… please don’t hesitate to call me. Phones are more fun anyways.Hopefully this new approach to email management will result in shorter lead times with more focused & creative work on my part. Cheers & here’s to life outside of my inbox! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

3 Traits That Separate the Best Leaders from Average Ones

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! Originally published Jan 5, 2017 5:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Leadership The best leaders seem to possess an elusive mix of qualities that resist precise categorization.It feels like every week there’s a new study or book discussing what the best leaders do and don’t do, but what if there was a more data-driven approach to identifying pivotal indicators of successful leadership?New data from Russell Reynolds Associates and Hogan Assessment Systems sheds some light on what separates the best leaders from average ones. By analyzing interviews, resumes, and multiple personality assessment questionnaires, researchers constructed in-depth psychometric profiles of 200 CEOs from around the world. They then validated the trends in an additional sample of 700 CEOs from Hogan’s global database.The final results, published in Harvard Business Review, reveal three major indicators of successful CEOs. Although there is no single perfect profile of a successful leader, the following qualities are usually associated with high-performing chief executives. Check them out below to see where you stand. 3 Successful Leadership Indicators1) They have a strong sense of purpose, passion, and urgency.The worst thing a CEO can do, according to a related study on CEO transitions by McKinsey & Company, is “sit on their hands.” The best CEOs move swiftly and decisively towards their personal and professional goals, never losing sight of their organization’s core purpose or wavering in their desire for change. Let’s break these specific qualities down to examine each individually:PurposeThink of purpose like an internal compass, guiding a leader’s actions and keeping them focused on the big picture objectives that impact their organization’s bottom line. The best leaders have an innate ability to understand how different components of their organizations contribute to long term goals, and they’re comfortable taking ownership of those larger missions. PassionHow do you measure passion? It’s tricky, but researchers found that leaders who worked towards their organizational goals with intensity and genuine excitement were more successful overall.Passion keeps leaders personally invested in the success of their organizations. It helps foster a profound sense of ownership over the changes they initiate, and motivates them to nurture those initiatives with enthusiasm and conviction. UrgencyResearchers found that urgency often manifested in successful CEOs as impatience and a consistent eagerness to drive progress. Most quality leaders are experts at mobilizing their teams, but the very best leaders are driven by a constant and deeply personal need to move things forward and seek new developments.They aren’t satisfied with moving slowly or with too much caution — they understand the importance of staying nimble and pushing their organizations towards transformative change. It’s important to note, however, that the best leaders don’t just make unreasonably impulsive decisions — they take measured risks to move their organizations into the future and keep ahead of the competition. 2) They know how to sift through information and find the most important parts.Leaders are responsible for managing potentially overwhelming amounts of information on a daily basis. Their responsibilities are broad and widely varied, requiring them to simultaneously oversee a number of initiatives and projects without losing focus on their organization’s core objectives.With so many moving parts to keep track of, leaders need to make tough decisions about what to prioritize. And this requires an innate ability to sift through information and make firm, confident choices about how to move their organizations forward.The most successful leaders have an elevated capacity to “separate the signal from the noise,” as the Russell Reynolds Associates study summarized it. “Great CEOs have a ‘nose’ for what are the most significant issues, challenges, threats, and opportunities facing an organization,” Dean Stamoulis, the leader of Russell Reynolds Associates, wrote in Harvard Business Review.While it might seem like it sometimes, successful leaders don’t exactly have a psychic power that enables them to make the best decisions — but they do know how to examine many different sources of information and make clear, largely independent decisions they can proudly stand behind. The best leaders navigate the complex demands of their roles with a heightened decisiveness that sets them apart from the pack.3) They are humble, always learning, and master collaborators.This might conflict with the conventional view of the chief executive as an extroverted and wildly independent commander, but the Russell Reynolds Associates study found that these leadership qualities were related to favorable organizational results.The best leaders are more than capable of acting independently, but they are self-aware enough to know that they can’t possibly know or do everything. To compensate for the gaps in their knowledge, they aren’t afraid to turn to advisors and employees to seek new ideas and points of view. They are constantly in pursuit of the best new ideas, and they don’t care if those ideas come from themselves or from someone else.Coupled with this open mindedness is a desire to always be absorbing new information, honing new skills, and bettering their own abilities through constant learning. The best leaders are not content to operate solely on what they currently know — they recognize that the demands of their position are always changing, and they need to better themselves to keep their organizations successful.So what does constant learning look like? It’s more than just reading new books and listening to podcasts. The most successful leaders learn from the people around them by engaging with projects at every level and surrounding themselves with people who aren’t afraid to challenge even their most closely held ideas.It’s this consistent intellectual immersion that keep leaders on their toes, forcing them to reevaluate, defend, and question what they know.What traits do you look for in a leader?last_img read more

TCU Beats Baylor, Bedlam is for the Big 12 Title

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. How about that? Ribbit, ribbit, ribbit. TCU beat Baylor in double overtime in a driving rainstorm and everything is coming up Bedlam. The Frogs’ win means whichever team wins Bedlam will be the 11-1 Big 12 champion.Baylor and TCU couldn’t score on the last 32 (not a typo!) drives of regulation but Baylor scored a TD to start OT. Then TCU came back with two straight that got me off the couch and pumping both my fists. Then Baylor got it back, had a 4th down and couldn’t convert.Here’s the stop that ended it.Here’s the 4th down stop that ended Baylor’s Championship hopes and gave TCU the win. https://t.co/sKCnUFpOfS— ESPN CollegeFootball (@ESPNCFB) November 28, 2015 The game was as sloppy as Big 12 games get (which is to say it was exactly like a Big 10 or SEC game). I’m not sure how TCU held on but I’m pretty sure some Bedlam sorcery was involved.https://twitter.com/kelbeyonce_15/status/670472360932147200The TCU win sets up, yep, the biggest game in the history of Oklahoma football (the state, not the school). I am jacked up. If you aren’t, watch this.The biggest football game in Oklahoma history is tomorrow. What a time to be alive.— Andrew Carter (@Andrew__Carter) November 28, 2015Oh yeah, and Part 1 of the “get OSU into the College Football Playoff” has been completed.Bring on Bedlam.last_img read more

Roundtable: How do we Feel About the Mike Gundy Coaching Rumors?

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. The PFB team discussed our feelings on the coaching rumors surrounding Mike Gundy, our thoughts on what’s going on behind the scenes, and more.Boone (me): Why do you think his name popped up in coaching rumors?Cox (contributor): Because he wanted it to.Caleb (intern):  Wait, he’s still around?Sam (hoops guru): Money talks. Gundy Badger deserves a raise, even if this is an awful time to bring it up after Bedlam :grimacing:Cox: I think the constant frustration/passive-aggressive turmoil between he and T. Boone and Holder is just going to be something that we are all going to have to live with.Southwell (uniform expert): Gundy Hundy. Athletic directors want a winnerCox: Agreed. Makes sense financially, even if it doesn’t for fans/football/whatever. I think the timing with this Bedlam fiasco is just coincidental.Caleb: Also, who doesn’t want a coach willing to rock a mullet? Besides like Harvard and Yale and all them fancy-types. And they aren’t worth Gundy’s time anyways.Thomas (X’s and O’s): I think if bedlam didn’t go the way it did , his name wouldn’t have been thrown out so much.Caleb: I think he truly is one of the better coaches in the nation, but the “bedlam curse” is hanging over him and it’s probably annoying. He doesn’t necessarily have a problem (ok maybe he does), but it’s probably just more of a hastle than anything. If you can get buckets of cash elsewhere without annoyance…..Sam: I don’t believe Baylor ever had a legitimate shot at himBoone: This happens to a lot of coaches, though. Holgerson’s name popped up for the Houston job — then got an extension and raise several days later. Is he doing what coaches do to get a raise or is it something more?Thomas: Yeah sometimes I get the sense that he’s using it as leverageSam: I have no doubt Gundy is frustrated with Holder/Boone though.. and that played a partCox: I’m sure it’s to get a raise and to make a point.Caleb: It’s tough to say if it’s a bluff for a raise or true interest. I would say the jobs connected are the best indicators, so Baylor seems like a bluff, but something like Oregon or equivalent could be an issue if it were real#Sources say Holder is considering trading Gundy to Oregon for a return of the grey unisCox: it’s a win-win for him… why not talk to them? raise here or more money there.Caleb: @kylecox that’s a good point. I mean, what is his downside to talking to others? Is OSU going to call his bluff and fire their winningest coach ever? Over rumors of him talking to other schools? Really?Cox: he’s got all the dominos and has earned them.Boone: I just feel like its a 100 percent leverage play. The downside, to Caleb’s point, is that he could be fired. It wouldn’t be smart — but I think OSU is tired of him playing the game.Sam: Holder and T Boone aren’t in control and they hate it. Caleb is rightSouthwell: Boone: He hasn’t earned a right to act this way, at least IMO. Do you see Bob Stoops pushing OU’s hand in public every year? What about Nick Saban? Their pay is different, but I don’t think he’s above it. No one is untouchable.Thomas: I just want a coach who’s going to coach wth kahunesIs that too much to askCox: Not saying I agree with it. He could talk to 15 schools and it doesn’t get out unless he wants it to… I was speaking in terms that he is pretty much untouchable at OSU. If they fired him, it would not only be a huge mistake it would make them look ridiculous.Caleb: I think the atheltic department is probably very frustrated with his actions/attitude. I would guess they’ve been hesitant to even consider firing the golden child for years, but with the rising expectations of Cowboy fans and the growing list of quality coaches, as well as the solid footing the program is on as a whole now, I would think they are no longer considering him completely off-limits. Especialy if they think fans are frustrated with the bedlam recordBoone: One final question “to get you out of here on this” (shoutout K-Port): Would you be OK if Gundy moved on this offseason, either by termination or from walking away?Thomas: I would quickly get over itEspecially if we got monkenBut no way holder hires that fireball of a coach because he couldn’t control himBoone: To me: I think I would be OK with it. Depending on who we could get in his place. I am on the #Fuente2Stilly train if it were to happen.Sam: Depends on the replacement- if we get a Fedora, Fuente? I think we’d be just fine. I don’t want no scrubs.Caleb: Totally depends on who we could get. Quality coach comes in and it’s a lot easier to look to the future, but it’s a HUGE gamble for Holder. Like, Dwarfs-Travis -Ford-Extension gamble…Cox: It all depends on who comes in… Look at Texas. The grass is not always greener and it’s a lot harder to win in Stillwater than in Austin. Who really knows if any of those guys will do any better? Charlie Strong was the hottest coach in the country four years ago.Southwell: It would be a weird time to leave. He’s got a really good shot at going to the CFB Playoff next year. To do that for your alma mater is even better. Legendary status.So I don’t think I would be ok with that. I’d feel let down. I would get behind whoever replaces him, but I’d want Gundy over all of the other coaches mentioned.Cox: agreed. this part of coaching isn’t fun but he’s not the only coach that does it. I’m sure UNC fans don’t love Fedora’s name in everyone’s mouth.last_img read more

Lindelof accepts competition in Man Utd ‘dream’

first_imgManchester United Lindelof accepts Man Utd competition as he lives the ‘dream’ Chris Burton 17:15 5/3/2018 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Victor Lindelof Manchester United Getty Images Manchester United Premier League Crystal Palace v Manchester United Crystal Palace The Swedish defender has endured a testing debut campaign in England, but believes he is adapting to the demands of life at a global superpower Victor Lindelof admits to living “a dream” at Manchester United and is accepting of competition for places at “one of the biggest clubs in the world”.The Sweden international defender moved to Old Trafford in the summer of 2017, with life at Benfica traded in for that at the Theatre of Dreams.Adjusting to the demands of a Premier League stage has not been easy, with Jose Mourinho having eased the 23-year-old into his plans following a testing opening to his debut campaign. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Williams case shows Solskjaer isn’t holding Man Utd’s youngsters back – he’s protecting them Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Lindelof has, however, improved as the season has progressed and is happy with his development at a club he always hoped would give him a chance.He told Sky Sports ahead of a possible outing against Crystal Palace on Monday: “Coming here to play at this great club has been a dream for me since I was a kid, so yeah – I enjoy it every day.”I wake up every day and I’m very happy I get to come here and do what I love. I don’t take anything for granted, I work hard every day.”I’m just trying to do my best every day, work hard and improve. When you’re given the chance to play, it’s always nice to be out there and help the team, and I’m just happy to be out there doing that.”We have world-class players in every position and I think that’s very important to have. This club is one of the biggest clubs in the world, so you’re obviously going to have that.”Lindelof has made 23 appearances this season, although only eight of those have been Premier League starts.He admits that the English top-flight has been something of an eye-opener for him, with the standard considerably higher than that he experienced while impressing in Portugal.”Every game is difficult here,” Lindelof added, with United looking to wrap up a runner-up finish this season.”Every opponent is going to work hard, fight for 90 minutes to try to get three points, and that’s what makes the Premier League such a good league, the level of competition. It was a bit different in Portugal, we had only a few big games during the season.”We want to win as many games as possible and of course, you always want to come first. But if not, second is there, and that’s what we have to work for.”We’re improving as a team every day. It’s important for us to play a lot of games, and just keep going.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

Firmino hopes for all-English Champions league tie

first_imgLiverpool Liverpool’s Firmino hoping for all-English Champions League quarter-final tie Goal 08:11 8/3/2018 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Roberto Firmino Liverpool Swansea Liverpool UEFA Champions League Liverpool v Porto Porto While team-mate Emre Can hopes to avoid playing another English team, the Brazilian believes such a clash would benefit the Reds Emre Can said on Tuesday that he would prefer for Liverpool to avoid another English side in the Champions League quarter-finals, but team-mate Roberto Firmino feels exactly the opposite. “I prefer to not play an English team, but I don’t care who,” Can said after his Liverpool side advanced to the last eight of Europe’s top for the first time since 2009. But his Brazilian team-mate feels like a clash against another Premier League side could be just the draw the Reds want to continue their advancement in the competition.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Williams case shows Solskjaer isn’t holding Man Utd’s youngsters back – he’s protecting them Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp With as many as four Premier League teams on pace to be in the quarter-finals, two Premier League sides being paired is a distinct possibility, and Firmino believes that Liverpool’s record against the top sides in the English top flight would bode well.“Yes, we’d like a draw against an English club,” he said. “Why not? We have shown in the past few seasons we can beat all the English clubs. “Our record is good against them. We feel we have played well against the top English clubs and shown we can beat them.”While drawing an English club would possibly give Jurgen Klopp’s side a mental boost, Firmino believes that his side making the last eight has given his team plenty of confidence to face whichever team they draw. “We are not concerned who we get. We don’t mind. We are not afraid. I don’t think we have anything to fear from any side now. “If you are in the draw (at this stage) then you can not be afraid of anyone. We feel we can beat any side on our day, and we don’t mind who we get. I think we are a team who will cause problems to others.“Of course they are good teams. They are all good teams (left in the draw). But I don’t think it matters to us (who we get).”We are a good team, we can play against the big Spanish teams and we feel we can be a match for them. You have to play against the big teams.”Liverpool and Manchester City have both confirmed their places in the last eight, though Tottenham fell short on Wednesday, losing out to Juventus 2-1 in the second leg. Manchester United and Chelsea could also still qualify, with Jose Mourinho’s side having worked out a 0-0 away draw in the first leg and Antonio Conte’s club level at 1-1 with Barcelona ahead of the return leg at the Camp Nou.  Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

Notebook: Jelani Woods on Offensive Involvement, and OL Reshuffles

first_imgSTILLWATER — This season of Cowboy football has brought plenty of talking points.From Chuba Hubbard’s rampant pace, a young but promising gunslinger, an experienced offensive line and an inexperienced defensive line, things certainly aren’t boring.Members of the Oklahoma State football team met with the media after practice Tuesday before the Cowboys bout with Kansas State this weekend. Here are a few of the topics that were discussed.Woods Not Concerned with Lack of Targets to this PointJelani Woods has been a fan-favorite since his move from quarterback to tight end, but he hasn’t appeared much on the stat sheet in his redshirt sophomore season.Until Saturday, when Woods made his first two catches of the season. Woods’ two snags were good for 22 yards against Texas. Although Woods is just getting in on the passing game this season, he has been impressive in his progression as a blocker.On Tuesday, Woods said it was fun to get involved in the passing game, but it isn’t all that he’s after.“I was pretty happy about it, but it really didn’t mean too much to me,” Woods said. “I got a lot of opportunities, just different teams play different coverages. So, of course I’m not going to get it always, so I’m not really upset about that or anything.”Woods was also involved in the controversial fake field-goal attempt. It didn’t work, but Woods touched on the topic a bit Thursday.“I was pretty excited on the inside because I was like, ‘It’s time to make a play,’” Woods said. “I was pretty excited. I’ve watched multiple times just to see what I could do better the make that play work.”Tuihalamaka Making StridesSamuela Tuihalamaka is leading OSU’s interior defensive linemen in tackles four games in, and most of those have come in the past two weeks.A redshirt freshman from Riverside, California, Tuihalamaka had only two tackles entering the Tulsa game, but he’s had 10 total tackles in the past two games. His 12 tackles this season rank ninth on the team and is second among all defensive linemen. However, Brock Martin is the only other D-lineman ahead of Tuihalamaka, and Martin sometimes lines up as a linebacker.“I kinda got a grip of it,” Tuihalamaka said. “I had guidance from the older guys like Cam Murray, Brendon Evers, Brock, Michael Scott, all them guys that played and a couple other guys back then like Enoch (Smith), Darrion (Daniels), all them guys. They kinda showed me the ropes a little bit.”Marcus Keyes Talks Offensive Line ShuffleDylan Galloway left the Texas game with an injury, and it forced some reshuffling for the Cowboys up front.Teven Jenkins filled Galloway’s spot at left tackle. Bryce Bray moved from right guard to right tackle. Then Ry Schneider came in and filled Bray’s open guard spot. Galloway’s status heading into Saturday is unknown.“Dylan, he’s doing his treatment; he’s going to try to come back as fast as possible,” Marcus Keyes said. “We’re going to do better as an offensive line to get everybody rolling.”The Texas game wasn’t an outstanding performance for OSU’s O-line. Star running back Chuba Hubbard couldn’t find many of the lanes he has found in recent weeks, as on 37 attempts, Hubbard averaged only 3.3 yards per carry.“We just need to finish our blocks more,” Keyes said. “That’s all we need to do. We just need to come off and finish, don’t let people cross our face. That’s all.” While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Global Voices for Maternal Health: An Innovative Crowd-Sourcing Project to Launch at Women Deliver!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 20, 2010July 21, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) On June 7th, 2010, the University of Oxford will be launching ‘Global Voices for Maternal Health’, a crowd-sourcing project to give maternal health care providers around the world a direct global voice in identifying and solving the barriers to providing evidence-based maternal health care. This ground-breaking project is supported by the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. To view other projects supported by the MHTF, click here.Global Voices for Maternal Health will have two elements:●     an online survey (in 9 languages) of over 10,000 maternal health care providers in developing countries about the barriers preventing the implementation of safe, effective and affordable treatments for complications related to pregnancy in their settings.●     an online discussion forum for health care providers, program managers and policy makers who are seeking new and innovative solutions for overcoming barriers to providing evidence-based maternal health care.The website will give new weight and force to the views of people who are actually delivering medical care, providing them with a stronger voice to determine where the global community’s future efforts should be focused.Visit www.globalvoices.org.uk to find out more and take part in the project.Please help us to spread the word about the project and reach people working on the ground. For information on how to help, please contact global.voices@obs-gyn.ox.ac.uk.Share this:last_img read more

Take the Survey–and Help the Maternal and Newborn Health Community Better Understand Clean Birth Kits

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 1, 2010June 1, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Saving Newborn Lives and Johns Hopkins University are leading a group conducting a short survey on implementation experiences with Clean Birth Kits, including contents, methods of distribution, and incentives/disincentives issues. The survey also includes potential CBK “add ons.” The results will be used to summarize the evidence on the use of birth kits in various contexts, to identify knowledge gaps, and, where appropriate, to make programmatic recommendations.Please click here to participate in the survey.To learn more about the Clean Birth Kits Working Group and its members, click here.Share this:last_img read more

Pogba: It felt like we were playing in Australia

first_imgWorld Cup Paul Pogba: It felt like we were playing in Australia Josh Thomas @Joshua_Thomas97 Last updated 1 year ago 14:06 6/17/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Pogba Getty World Cup Australia France v Australia Denmark v Australia Australia v Peru France Paul Pogba The France star was impressed by Australia on and off the pitch in Kazan Just under 12,000km separate Australia and Kazan, but an estimated 10,000 Socceroos fans turned the Russian city into a fortress against France on Saturday.While they came close to seeing an upset only for the French to sneak away with a controversial 2-1 win, the Aussie fans have left some impression.France’s Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba admitting post-match that he felt like the game was a home one for the Socceroos.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Perfection from Pulisic: Chelsea’s Captain America has arrived in the Premier League Why always Raheem? ‘Unplayable’ Sterling setting a standard Man City’s other stars need to match ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar “It was intense,” Pogba said.”The Australian fans were shouting, they were even booing our players so we felt like we were playing in Australia.”Pogba struck the winning goal against Australia with his effort passing the goal-line by a matter of centimetres.It added to France’s earlier fortune when they were awarded the first ever World Cup penalty by VAR – a controversial decision to say the least.While sheepish in victory, Pogba made a special note to praise a Socceroos side who were widely dismissed heading into the game. “I guess we were lucky, but we create luck,” he said.”You can see today they (Australia) play very well, defend very well, they play altogether.”That is not a small team.”Australia will play Denmark next in their now up-hill battle to escape Group C, while France will take on Peru.last_img read more

Germany drop Ozil & Khedira for crucial Sweden game

first_imgWorld Cup Germany vs Sweden team news: Ozil and Khedira dropped for crucial game Goal Last updated 1 year ago 00:53 6/24/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(2) Mesut Ozil Germany 2018 Getty Images World Cup Germany v Sweden Sweden Germany The duo were criticised for their performances against Mexico, leading to them missing out alongside the injured Mats Hummels Mesut Ozil and Sami Khedira have been left out of the starting XI for Germany’s must-win World Cup game against Sweden.Ozil was the subject of fierce criticism for his part in the reigning champions’ opening loss to Mexico, with the likes of Stefan Effenberg and Lothar Matthaus calling for him to be dropped.And as Germany’s hopes of surviving the group stage depend on beating Saturday’s opponents, Joachim Low has opted for a big change to his team by leaving out two key players. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Perfection from Pulisic: Chelsea’s Captain America has arrived in the Premier League Why always Raheem? ‘Unplayable’ Sterling setting a standard Man City’s other stars need to match ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Ozil loses his place to Borussia Dortmund star Marco Reus, while Khedira, who was replaced 60 minutes into the loss against Mexico, is replaced by Sebastian Rudy.Mats Hummels also misses out after picking up a neck injury, allowing Antonio Rudiger to step in, while Jonas Hector replaces Marvin Plattenhardt at left-back.Sweden coach Janne Andersson, meanwhile, has left his side unchanged from the team that beat South Korea 1-0 in their first match of the tournament.TEAM NEWS 📋 Here’s how #GER line up for our Group F #WorldCup clash with #SWE 👀#DieMannschaft #ZSMMN #GERSWE pic.twitter.com/Csnj60YeGL— Germany (@DFB_Team_EN) June 23, 2018After Mexico’s win over South Korea earlier in the day, Germany need at least a draw to have a chance of progressing into the second round heading into their game against the Asian side.Germany starting XI: Neuer; Kimmich, Boateng, Rudiger, Hector; Kroos, Rudy; Muller, Reus, Draxler; Werner.Sweden starting XI: Olsen; Lustig, Lindelof, Granqvist, Augustinsson; Larsson, Ekdal, Claesson, Forsberg; Berg, Toivonen.last_img read more