Booking com and Airbnb have introduced options for longer stays in accommodation facilities

first_imgAirbnb targets digital nomads and sets trends that follow Booking.com Airbnb points out that more than six million active entries on the platform accept monthly stays, and more than half of those entries offer discounts for extended trips. Although Airbnb did not provide specific figures, they claim that guest bookings for a monthly stay have “increased significantly” in recent months. Photo by AirBnb Under the new feature, the weekly tariff plan requires a minimum stay of seven nights, while the monthly tariff plan requires a minimum stay of 28 nights. // BOOKING.COM CLOSES FIVE OFFICES WORLDWIDE, ONE IN CROATIA In early September, Airbnb reported that bookings for monthly stays had “increased significantly” since the start of the pandemic, citing growing interest in the concepts of “working from anywhere” i.e. digital nomads. Photo: Daria Shevtsova, Pexels.com Long-term rentals and digital nomads are in trend. center_img There are two trends, one caused by the coronavirus pandemic, where many companies have shifted their business to work from home while others have sought safer places, outside big cities and thus digitally relocated their businesses, as well as another trend that has become even more important during the covid and acceleration, thanks to the digitalization of business and the IT industry – of course they are digital nomads. Although practically every type of real estate meets the requirements for price plans for longer stays, this move is largely designed to strengthen the business of houses and apartments on Booking.com, and especially communication to focus on long-term rent. In response to the growing demand for long-term stays, Booking.com now allows property owners to offer weekly and monthly rates. Booking.com’s move follows Airbnb’s move, which back in April focused on long-term rentals and digital nomads, with the aim of taking advantage of accommodation trends for longer stays. Airbnb and Booking.com are a great example of positive competition pushing each other and racing over who will be faster, better, more efficient. And thus they are pushing the whole market forward. To make it easier for digital nomads to find the types of stays they are looking for, Airbnb has updated its homepage in most countries to highlight ways people can discover long-term rental stays nearby. – We make the search easier, and we also help the hosts to understand this type of stay and how to use it while again making it easier for the guests to find the right accommodation for their needs., point out from Airbnb. last_img read more

A mom shares her concerns about 4/20 and cannabis culture

first_imgI’m a mom. I’m sick of this in-your-face cannabis cultureLos Angeles Times 17 April 2020Family First Comment: “once your kid has a problem with drugs, the ubiquity of pots shops and how cool they look and their pervasive promotion across the city can feel disturbing. It’s as if the schools and public health professionals and parents are giving kids one message and the billboards that litter the city are giving them another. Which seems cooler to a 16-year-old? Earnest mom talks or rainbow billboards? When I was a kid, I know which one I would have chosen.”#saynopetodopeVoteNO.nzOur daughter got into college on the East Coast and packed up her winter clothes and some hard-won life lessons and is thriving now. But her story could easily have gone in a different direction. I don’t know if pot is a “gateway drug,” but you don’t have to watch the film “Beautiful Boy” biting back tears to know that from a little problem can grow life-changing trouble before you, the parent, even know the seed has been planted.A few months ago, our 16-year-old was found with a vape pen. I was furious. I was so furious I stayed quiet the entire 30-minute ride home from his high school. He sat next to me in the passenger seat. “Mom, I’m sorry,” he said. “It was a stupid thing to do.” I looked at him and said, “I don’t want to say anything I will regret, so I am not going to talk right now.” I had a pit in my stomach thinking, “Not this again.”As we got into our neighborhood, we drove by a billboard that featured a woman with pink and yellow rainbow hair and silver eyebrows, with a large, bubble-lettered sign that read “Kushy Punch.”If I was 16 and everybody was vaping strawberry nicotine or Red Sundae cannabis or whatever Kushy Punch is, I’m sure I’d want to do it too. I grew up in the 1980s and we smoked pot in high school. I got it mostly from friends and my parents didn’t pay much attention — it was the ’80s. But the marijuana wasn’t particularly potent. We didn’t smoke it through USB ports. It wasn’t promoted on every corner or by every social media influencer (we didn’t have social media or influencers back then). It was a simpler time. But maybe every generation thinks that.I didn’t want to ruin Amy’s cannabis shopping spree. And I don’t think dispensaries are the root of the teen weed issue. But once your kid has a problem with drugs, the ubiquity of pots shops and how cool they look and their pervasive promotion across the city can feel disturbing. It’s as if the schools and public health professionals and parents are giving kids one message and the billboards that litter the city are giving them another. Which seems cooler to a 16-year-old? Earnest mom talks or rainbow billboards? When I was a kid, I know which one I would have chosen.READ MORE: https://www.latimes.com/lifestyle/story/2020-04-17/4-20-marijuana-cannabis-cultureColorado mum Jo worked in youth drug prevention educating young people about the risk behaviours, and also worked in drug testing.Jo has a warning for New Zealand parents based on her own harrowing experience of marijuana within her family, and also the effect of legalisation of recreational marijuana in her home state of Colorado.Read more: www.saynopetodope.nzlast_img read more