Retrograding Digital Footage with the Editors of Documentary Now!

first_imgWant to get your DSLR video to look like vintage 16mm black and white? Let’s explore how to retrograde digital footage with the editors of the mockumentary IFC show Documentary Now!There are plenty of reasons for retrograding footage to make it look like it was shot forty years ago and on film. One of those reasons might be because you’re an editor for IFC’s mockumentary television show Documentary Now! starring Bill Hader and Fred Armisen. Another reason might be because you think it looks cool.Regardless of your reason, background, or editing prowess, if you’re curious, it’s actually a pretty fun problem to solve (and surprisingly not that difficult). Here’s a sneak peek into how the Documentary Now! team works.If you’re interested in retrograding your footage, whether in Adobe’s Creative Cloud or organically, here are some techniques to consider.Old Movie Effects in Premiere ProLike the Documentary Now! team shows, you can do some basic retrograding in Adobe’s Creative Cloud, including in their flagship program Premiere Pro. Evan – Creative Tuts gives a breakdown on how to add background scratches and tone tints to manipulate your footage to look like it was filmed on an old-timey video camera. It’s a quick technique for punching up flashbacks or faking old footage.Vintage Effects in After EffectsIf you’re looking for a little more control to stylize your retrograde, working in After Effects will probably be your best bet. Luckily, one of our PremiumBeat contributors has created a tutorial that shows you how to build a couple of different vintage looks into your project. You can view the video above and follow the links in the bio to download the free assets and presets to help you along your way.Vintage Presents in Final Cut ProAlong with presets for After Effects and Premiere Pro, there are also resources available for creating similar retrograded looks in Apple’s Final Cut Pro. This Shutterstock tutorial shows how to install and use ten free presets to quickly upload and retrograde your footage for a variety of vintage and retro looks.Bonus Overlays and PresetsIf you’re still looking for some more assets and presets to overlay on your footage, here are a few more free PremiumBeat assets and tutorials (like the 1980s style logo reveal above). Hopefully, with a little creative inspiration and a good base of resources, you can retrograde your digital footage to mirror the same styles as those seen in the classic clips from Documentary Now!5 Free Camera Overlays20 Free After Effects Color Presets14 Free Lumetri Color Grading Presets Have any other tips or tricks for retrograding footage? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

How to Produce Results Faster

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now There are two strategies for producing results faster. One of these strategies is highly effective and certain to produce results. The other strategy doesn’t provide either the result or the certainty, even if it is more attractive to many.The Promise of Hard WorkThe proven way to produce any result faster is to do the work that produces that results consistently over time. Just doing the work by itself does not speed up the results, especially when work is done poorly and sporadically. Success in any endeavor is more like an auditor who measures your effort to determine when you have paid the price to have what you want. Anything done poorly is discounted, and anything done occasionally isn’t noticed.Many find the price they would have to pay for faster results is higher than expected, and they seek a way to have they want without having to pay the price. They look for shortcuts that allow them to buy success.Success in Seven Minutes and Other LiesThere are people who will sell you the idea that you can have the results you want now without having to do the work, and without having to stack up small, incremental gains over time. There are some who are easily seduced by the idea that there is a way they can get what they want without the effort, the struggle, and the time. They desperately want to believe the lie that they can have what they want in seven minutes.When the quick fix doesn’t work, instead of committing to doing the work, they move on to the next promise of instant results. At some point, they give up on wanting the result altogether.Faster Now Means Starting a Long Time AgoIt’s difficult to sell the promise of disciplined effort over time. It’s especially challenging when contrasted against the promise of instant results now with no effort required.If what you want is important, producing results faster now would require that you started sometime in the past and sustained the effort over time. This is not a possibility, unless you have a time machine (which is more likely than the effectiveness of any “instant results” solution). The second-best option is to do the work now, and to do it so consistently, that you start stacking up the results you want.Are you doing the work? Are you consistent in the quality and the frequency of your effort?last_img read more

5 Tricks for Generating Traffic When Nobody’s at Work

first_imgAre you doing anything this weekend to generate traffic to your website? If you’re a B2B marketer, chances are you’ve probably asked yourself at some point: How do I keep marketing effectively when nobody is in the office? You want to continue to drive traffic and leads, but you don’t know exactly how.The wrong thing to do is assume that nobody is listening on holidays or during weekends. Depending on your audience, this could actually be a good time for a new blog post, video release, or email. Data from a recent Xobni survey shows that people are still wired into work during time off: 68% of working adults say they check email while they aren’t working, and 27% of those people will check email more than once.Here are some tips on how you can use this knowledge to the advantage of your marketing program.Be Creative in Your CommunicationsTry something a little zany, and see what happens. Marketing on a day off can sometimes work in your favor because there’s less clutter in people’s inboxes and social media feeds. It could also make your job a lot harder because people don’t want to be bothered. This means you’ve gotta step it up!The email below is a great example of what we’re talking about. Aside from witty copy, the sender has an extra special offer:The result of a creative message like this is not only traffic and leads to your site, but it’s also an entertained email recipient. The readers of this email probably felt lucky even though they were working on holiday. And if your readers feel lucky to be getting an email from you on a day off, that’s a wonderful thing! Think of creative ways you can stand out in your audience’s social media feeds and inboxes during off-times or holidays by playing with witty language and special offers. Test and Measure Your Marketing TacticsIf you’re going to try out some out-of-the-box communication tactics, you’re going to want to walk away from the experience with some lessons learned. The best way to do this is to take a scientific approach through which you can use testing and data to drive future decisions.An excellent example of a company that tried this is Brewer’s Market. The test was featured on subscription site WhichTestWon.com as an example of how to test during the holidays. The goal was to determine which copy was most appealing to gift-buyers. The company did an A/B split test on its homepage and found that its control page performed 61% better than the treatment page from December 16th to the 23rd. The article concludes with an excellent insight: Although in hindsight, it makes sense to adjust your copy length and benefits for your seasonal visitors’ perspective, the idea was a huge point of contention between the site’s execs, some of whom “hated” the winning version… before they saw the results data. Now, their 2012 design plans include tweaked homepage versions for all major holidays from Valentine’s Day on.While this an example of how a business used A/B testing to optimize their homepage for the holiday season, holidays and off-hours are also a safe time to conduct tests in general, due to a reduction in traffic and attention. You’ll just want to make sure you’re still generating enough traffic to make your tests statistically significant.Don’t Quit on Content Just because it’s the weekend or a holiday doesn’t mean your audience will completely stay away from the internet (in fact, we’ve heard of some people even using work as an excuse to take a break from a lot of family time). Maybe your audience just prefers to use Twitter more on the weekends. The only way to find out is to try using a variety of channels and analyze what works best for your individual audience. QuickenLoans, for example, recently used its blog during the quietest week of the holiday season to drive traffic to their site. The company posted a series of timely articles, from what to do with unwanted gift cards, to how to handle post-holiday returns, to fireplace alternatives that will keep you cozy and New Year’s Eve safety tips. The takeaway here is that you shouldn’t stop publishing content when people are out of the office. Instead, you should adjust your content so that it’s timely and promoted using the channels your audience uses during their time off. Use Data to Make Informed DecisionsIf you know a certain segment of your audience is more likely to be working on Sundays (young and hungry entrepreneurs perhaps), you can use that knowledge to drive your decisions and create targeted, relevant content directed toward that segment. Likewise, if you know a certain demographic is going to be annoyed by certain messaging over the holidays, you can avoid a bad situation. The Xobni survey found that younger adults between the ages of 18 to 44 were most likely to feel annoyed or frustrated about receiving work-related emails during the holidays.You can learn more about your audience’s preferences by observing which demographics convert on certain days. If your landing page forms ask the right demographic questions, you can export your lead data, along with the conversion dates, and do tons of great analysis like figuring out exactly who converts on Saturday mornings? Knowing that will help you identify the kinds of people you should hit with your Saturday morning email send, for example.Show Your Brand’s PersonalityHolidays and weekends are the perfect time to lighten things up, have a little fun, and show off the part of your brand’s personality that makes it relatable to your audience. Google is known for doing this and doing it well. Its most recent treat was an interactive Google logo that played “Jingle Bells.” This past Halloween, HubSpot released a video of our very own flash mob, complete with zombies and gore, to the soundtrack of Michael Jackson’s hit, “Thriller.” Not only did we have a blast making the video, but we also managed to give our audience a Halloween treat and show off our brand’s unique personality.Have you had any success with marketing during the holidays or off hours? What worked (or didn’t work) for you? Topics: Inbound Marketing Originally published Jan 27, 2012 6:30:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

40 Ways to Get Banned From the Top 5 Social Networks

first_img Social Media Fails Originally published Sep 17, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: It may feel like a fustercluck, but there are actually some rules and regulations that go along with participating in social media. Not the kind that ban people from uploading pictures of their meals (PB&J no crust today guys! #omgsohungry), but the ones that help alleviate things like spamming, bad content, and a poor community experience. You know, the things that help make social media a nice place to be.It’s not a perfect system the social networks have worked out, but it’s important for marketers to know — because believe it or not, lots of marketers are breaking these rules and don’t even know it. And it breaks our hearts to see marketers giving an honest go of social media get banned from the networks … and then not even know why the heck it happened.This post will review the policies the most popular social networks have set up — some more stringent than others — that we think you should be aware of. And we tried to put them in plain English, too, devoid of confusing and boring legal babble. If you’re accidentally breaking any of these rules, at least now you can put the kibosh on your illicit activities before it’s too late!How Marketers Can Get Banned From PinterestIf you’re curious how the newest social network on the block works, we encourage you to read its Terms & Privacy page in full. But for a quick reality check, here are the guidelines marketers should remember when pinning to ensure they stay in Pinterest’s good graces:1) Grabbing another company’s account name. When you open an account on Pinterest, you’re indicating that you are authorized to act on behalf of that company. So if you’re not an employee of that company, you’re not authorized. And if you get caught, you’re not allowed on Pinterest anymore, either.2) Pinning copyrighted content. Any content you post cannot infringe on the rights of the content creator. Make sure it’s either content you’ve created yourself, or content you have a license to share. That means if you’re posting an image from your blog post, that better be copyright-free!3) Automating your Pinterest content. Marketers can’t use an automated service to post content to their pinboards, repin or like other pinners’ content, or create links. All the rewards you reap from Pinterest, in other words, have to come from your own hard work! Note: If you pin a ton of content from one URL all in one sitting — let’s say you just published a blog post with a ton of great images, for example — you may be prompted by Pinterest to verify that you’re not a bot. Just fill it in and keep on keepin’ on.4) Scraping content from Pinterest. On a similar note, you can’t use automation to scrape content from Pinterest. Whether you wanted to use it in blog posts, on your Facebook page, to get a list of links — whatever — you can’t do it. Again, any information or content gathered has to be done manually.5) Scraping for contacts. Any contacts you get from Pinterest have to be opt-ins; as in, they have to come to your site and fill out a form saying they want to hear more from you. Scraping Pinterest for pinners’ personal information so you can market to them later is strictly prohibited.6) Spamming posts. Just like you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of blogs, you shouldn’t be spamming the comments sections of pins.7) Putting links in the wrong place. Pinterest wants you to include links in your pins so pinners can follow the links to get more information on a pin. But they only want it in the right place. When you pin an image, click ‘Edit,’ where you’ll find a field labeled ‘Link.’ Put your link anywhere else and you may get banned.8) Don’t get banned. If you’ve been banned once, you’re banned for life. Or as Pinterest puts it, “the Service is not available to any users previously removed from the service by Pinterest.” So, tread lightly.How Marketers Can Get Banned From LinkedInLinkedIn’s rules aren’t as stringent as the ones we’ve seen on other social networks — perhaps the B2B playground hasn’t gotten quite so out of hand. You can read LinkedIn’s User Agreement in full, or just browse these highlights that jump out for marketers:1) Connecting with people you don’t know. Seriously! You have to actually know the people you connect with on LinkedIn, or they can boot ya right off!2) Posting copyrighted content to forums. Whether it’s your LinkedIn Group, LinkedIn Company Page, or on LinkedIn Answers, you can’t publish information that violates others’ intellectual property rights. This one won’t get you banned, but LinkedIn can remove the content and close your group or page. Additionally, LinkedIn will terminate the accounts of users who have been “deemed to be repeat infringers under the United States Copyright Act.” You know who you are.3) Using LinkedIn messages as an ESP. LinkedIn messages are not to be used for mass emailing. This constitutes a misuse of service, and can get you kicked off the network.4) Putting links and email addresses where they don’t belong. You get to fill out your profile however you want, as long as it’s accurate. So if you put, say, a link to your blog in, oh I don’t know, the ‘Name’ field … you’re gonna get shut down pretty fast.5) Selling your LinkedIn presence. Built up a pretty big LinkedIn Group? It might be an asset, but you can’t sell it or monetize it in any way if you want to stay on the social network.6) Using bots to get connections, followers, or members. Just like Pinterest and some other social networks we’re about to cover in this blog post, LinkedIn wants you to grow your reach organically.7) Impersonating another company. Another familiar refrain, brands can’t create a fake profile for a competitor to mess around on. You’ll look stupider doing that than they will, anyway.How Marketers Can Get Banned From TwitterThe full list of Twitter “rules” can be found here: The Twitter Rules. Aptly named, eh? Here are the ones that are most likely to apply to marketers so you don’t get banned by that sweet little tweety bird:1) Impersonating others. If you’re impersonating others in an attempt to mislead other Twitter users, Twitter will not be happy. That means no pretending to be a competitor — that’s a low blow move, anyway.2) Snagging trademarked usernames. Another sketchy move is trying to grab your competitor’s username. If they’ve trademarked the name, Twitter will reclaim it from you on their behalf. Twitter will also suspend you if you’re using trademarked logos on your profile.3) Squatting on handles. Ow, that sounds uncomfortable. This means you can’t grab a Twitter username and not use it. Well, you can, but Twitter will just grab it right back if it remains inactive after 6 months. On a related note, you can’t grab a username for the purposes of selling it.4) Buying or selling Twitter usernames. There can be no transactions made around Twitter usernames at all. The penalty is possible permanent suspension from Twitter — for buyers and sellers.5) Giving yourself an unearned Twitter badge. Twitter has little badges for Promoted Products and Verified Accounts. If you use one of these badges anywhere on your profile — including your profile picture or background image — your profile will be suspended.6) Posting the same thing over and over. If you’re trying to get a tweet visibility, you can’t do it by tweeting it like a maniac, particularly if it’s duplicate content tweeted at specific users. Same goes for links — Twitter will penalize you if they see you tweeting the same link over, and over, and over … and over.7) Following people like a bot would. That means you shouldn’t use a bot to manage your following and unfollowing, nor should you act like a bot when manually following and unfollowing people. Aggressive follow and unfollow behavior — particularly seeing a large amount of people followed and/or unfollowed in a short period of time — will signal to Twitter that something’s amiss.8) Getting followers in sketchy ways. Specifically, those “get followers fast!” schemes. It may get you permanently banned from Twitter.9) Hijacking a hashtag or Trending Topic. If there’s a #hashtag or trending topic blowing up Twitter and you want in on the action, you can’t try to hijack it with unrelated content about your brand. If you do, you could feel the wrath of the mighty blue bird mighty soon.10) Posting links with no context. If your updates are just a slew of links with no personal content to give them context, you’ll not only annoy your followers, but Twitter will also want you off their network.11) Getting ratted out. Sometimes the Twitter community self-polices. If a large number of people are blocking you, or your account has received a lot of SPAM complaints, Twitter will boot you. So play nice out there.How Marketers Can Get Banned From Google+If you’re using Google+, there are a couple surprises in here that you might not have considered. You can read their Google+ Policies & Principles in full here, or catch the biggies below:1) Creating fake pages. Yes, it’s prohibited here, too. Big shock. Moving on.2) Running contests. Ooooh, that’s a new one! You cannot run contests, sweepstakes, offers, or coupons directly on your Google+ page, but you can display a link to those promotions that leads people offsite.3) Aggressive Circling. That’s a … weird phrase. But much like you can’t aggressively follow and unfollow people on Twitter without getting flagged, you can’t Circle a ton of people on Google+ without punishment.4) Altering or adding +1 buttons where they don’t belong. Similar to the Twitter badge rule, you can’t, say, superimpose the Google +1 button on an ad. It’s a misleading way to garner clicks.5) Keyword stuffing. Yes, it can happen here, too! Because Google+ is so closely tied with organic search, the penalties are just as stiff. If you’re trying to rank for a keyword, stuffing it into every Google+ update is not the way to do it.6) Marketing regulated products. If you’re marketing in a regulated industry, such as alcohol, tobacco, medical devices, fireworks, pharmeceuticals, etc., you cannot use Google+ to market those topics.7) Letting your page go dormant. If your Google+ account is dormant for more than 9 months, Google can snatch it right back from ya.How Marketers Can Get Banned From FacebookWe’ve all probably participated in our fair share of complaining about leaving Facebook. But could they force marketers to leave? Maybe, if they start doing any of these things that violate the Facebook Page Guidelines:1) Creating fake accounts. As Forrest Gump said, “That’s all I have to say about that.”2) Using bots or scrapers. Well, almost. Facebook says you can’t use them “without our prior permission.” Which basically means no using bots or scrapers … if you had permission, you’d know it.3) Posting copyrighted content. You’ve heard this one a bunch of times in this blog post, and if you do it a bunch of times on Facebook, they have the right to disable your account.4) Naming your page in goofy ways. Facebook has some pretty stringent naming requirements! Your page name cannot consist of solely generic terms, like “pizza,” must use proper grammar and capitalization, may not be in all caps, and may not include character symbols.5) Collecting user data incorrectly. What does that mean, exactly? It means you have to clearly state that it’s your business, not Facebook, collecting their information, and you will obtain their consent before using their data in any way.6) Including calls-to-action in your cover photo. This includes promotions or discounts, requests to ‘Like’ or share your photo, contact information for your business, or generic CTAs like “Tell a Friend.”7) Running contest or promotions outside of a Facebook app. If you want to run a contest or promotion on Facebook, you can only do it through one of their apps — either a Canvas Page or a Facebook App. You also can’t base participation on a requirement that a user take any action with your brand page, such as uploading a photo to your Timeline, or “Liking” a wall post. The only actions that are allowed as a condition of participation are “Liking” a page, connecting to your app, or checking in to a Place. You can’t use any Facebook mechanism, like the ‘Like’ button, in order to vote or register for the promo, either. Finally, you can’t notify winners through Facebook. So basically … you have to jump through a whole lotta hoops if you want to run a promotion or contest on Facebook.Have you unwittingly broken any of these social media rules? Have we missed any that you think marketers should know about?Image credit: emilyrides Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Why Search Volume Doesn’t Matter as Much as You Think

first_img Measuring SEO Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Search volume calculates the numbers of times a keyword is searched for in a particular search engine. Previously, it was the marketer’s go-to metric to figure out what keywords would be the best to optimize around.However, as we (and search engines) have become smarter about how we optimize for SEO, that has all started to change. Why? Because these days, the emphasis should be more on quality and conversions than volume alone.4 Things That Matter More Than Search VolumeIt’s not that search volume doesn’t matter at all. Search volume is a good sign that there are people out there looking for help on a particular subject matter. But here’s what matters a lot more than a ton of search volume for a particular keyword or phrase:1) Conversion RatesIf you have 1,000 people come to your site off a keyword for which your content ranks, but only 2 people convert, does it really matter that you had 1,000 people come to your site? The purpose of SEO is much more than just attracting people to your content. It’s about attracting people to your content who find it relevant to their interests and needs. Let’s say you’re a B2B business selling analytics software for marketers. There are two approaches that you can take. You can try to create content about analytics in general, or you can make your content a bit more specific to marketing analytics. In the first case, you may attract more people who are interested in all kinds of analytics: marketing analytics, sales analytics, etc. (That is, if you can rank for the head term.) In the second case, you would attract people who are more relevant to your buyer persona.Which situation is more likely to yield actual customers? If you said the latter, I agree with you.2) FeasibilityWhen you’re creating your SEO plan, one of the first things you need to do is keyword research. But instead of basing this process on search volume, think about how likely you are to actually rank for and convert on the keywords you’re selecting.How much content are you going to create around those topics? How much content do you already have on those topics? How are you ranking now for related terms? Create your plan not just around what keywords make the most sense for your business to rank for — but how you can invest in the time and resources it takes to have a strong SEO strategy in place.3) User ExperienceFun Fact: Did you know that if someone comes to your site through a search engine and bounces to another site soon after, it doesn’t actually help your SEO?If the 1,000 people I mentioned before come to your site — but then realize your content isn’t helpful, interesting, easy to read, etc. — you’re not really doing much to help your SEO. Search engines are smart enough now to recognize and reward the sites that produce good content. And it makes sense that they’d care about this — they want to deliver the best possible search experience for their users. Think about these questions the next time you’re creating content. What does your site visitor do once they’re on your site? Are they engaged with your content? Do they click around? Do they look at various content offers you’ve created? These are all important questions to ask about your visitors that matter far more than going after keywords of a certain search volume.4) Writing for Your Buyer PersonaAbove all, your number one rule when optimizing for SEO is creating content for your buyer personas. If you can create content that will get a lot of people to your website — but they aren’t necessarily part of your target audience — it doesn’t help you grow your business. Whether you’re working on a large marketing campaign or simply writing a blog post, you always need to have your buyer persona in mind. What problems do they face? What are they trying to accomplish? What could help them do their jobs effectively or more efficiently? Your buyer personas are the key to improving your conversion rates.Like I said earlier, it’s not that search volume is the new dark horse of SEO. It’s not. But you should use it more to guide your SEO strategy than define it. The most important things to focus on are choosing topics that you can write to at a sustainable volume, improving your site conversion rates, and writing quality content that addresses the needs and interests of your buyer personas. Originally published Apr 11, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

What Is a Trust Seal, and Does Your Landing Page Need One? [FAQs]

first_img Landing Page Design Originally published May 19, 2014 2:30:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 So you’re reading up on creating your first landing page, and everything seems like a no-brainer. Great headline? Check. Form that’s the proper length? Check. Customized “submit” button? Check, check, check. Then you see “trust seals.” You stop. You’re not sure what that means or if you need to include them on your landing page.The other suggestions seem simple — this one’s out of left field. So what do you do? Here’s what you need to know about trust seals (sometimes referred to as trust “symbols”) before slapping one on your landing page.What’s a Trust Seal?Turns out you’ve seen lots and lots of trust seals before, but you never realized you could use them in your marketing. Remember the last time gave over your credit card information on a website? Somewhere near the form fields where you put in your credit card information will usually feature one of these images:These are trust seals. They are there to help reassure you that your sensitive information is secure with the company and/or website you’re giving it to. In theory, once you see these on any landing page, you should feel much more secure giving over your information and converting on the form.But that’s not always what happens. Sometimes it might be successful … and other times, it might not. So you’ve got to figure out whether you should use one on your site or not. When Should I Use One?The best answer to this question is you don’t know if it’ll work until you try it. You’ve got to run A/B tests on your own landing pages to figure it out because your business is different from every other one that’s run this before. (Don’t know how to run an A/B test? We’ve got some simple instructions here.) If you wanted to get an idea of what you could expect out of the test before you run it, think about what kind of information you’re asking people to give up in the form. Is it sensitive information like credit card numbers, home phone numbers, or social security numbers? I’d venture a guess that a trust seal could work wonders. Are you just asking for an email, and nothing else? Adding a trust symbol could be overkill — people might wonder what you would’ve done if there weren’t a trust seal. Moral of the story? Trust seals can be great on your landing pages — or they can flop. It’s up to you to figure it out from here. 😉 Image credits: Arrested Development Wiki, Baymard Institute Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more

The Biggest SEO Blunders of All Time

first_img Originally published Jun 19, 2014 6:30:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 SEO inception: Google punishes itself for using black hat tactics?There’s only one company out there that can bring Google, the almighty ruler of internet search, to its knees. And that company, of course, is Google.Back in 2012, the Google Chrome homepage received a two-month penalty after it was discovered the site was benefiting from paid links.Two years prior, the company got itself in hot water — with itself — for cloaking content on its AdWords help pages.For more instances of Google punishing Google for SEO infractions, check out this great post from Search Engine Land.And there you have it, some of the biggest SEO missteps in recent history. Remember: If you want to stay in the clear with your site, just avoid making these common SEO mistakes. Got any SEO horror stories you’d like to share? Sound off in the comments below! Topics: BMW feels the Google kiss of death for using doorway pages, receives a “0” PageRankThe year was 2006, and German car company BMW’s German website (BMW.de) was mopping it up in the search rankings with important keywords like “used car.”As it turns out, the company had been using doorway pages to artificially inflate their inbound links and rank higher for competitive keywords. A doorway page, also known as a bridge or portal page, is a webpage that’s created solely for the purpose of redirecting visitors to a parent page. In BMW’s case, this page was BMW.de.Even back in 2006, Google wasn’t messing around. BMW.de was promptly blacklisted, receiving a PageRank of 0 as a consequence of the infraction.Toys R Us pays $5.1 million for Toys.com domain name, forgets to set up 301 redirectsToys R Us really, really wanted to dominate the word “toys’ in search, so much so that they paid top dollar for the eponymous domain name, toys.com, back in 2010.While the plan was to score some serious SEO cred for having such a searched-for term — toys — right in their domain name, the crew handling the project made a big, big mistake: when they launched the new site, they failed to redirect their old URLs. As a result, Google re-indexed the site, so instead of seeing their search ranking for “toys” climb, the Toys R’ Us team watched it take a nose dive.In this case, there was no ill SEO-intent on the part of the company. They didn’t use any black hat tactics — they just messed up. Big time.Want to make sure the same thing doesn’t happen to you? When making big changes to your site, keep track of everything in a workbook.Overstock.com trades discounts for links, loses $1.05 billion in revenue after Google takes noticeRap Genius was by no means the first company to construct a scheme for generating rank-boosting links. Back in 2011, it was discovered that online retailer Overstock.com was encouraging colleges and universities to embed links on their websites in exchange for faculty and student discounts on Overstock.com merchandise.As far as terrible, sleazy, no-good, rotten link-building schemes go, this one was actually pretty clever. The “.edu” designation that most academic websites carry gives those sites some extra authoritativeness in the eyes of Google. So if you can get a bunch of these sites to link to your site using the keywords you want to target, you’ll be more likely to rank for those keywords.The problem, of course, is that trading discounts for links doesn’t help make information on the web any more organized. In fact, it muddles it all up (why would all these academic institutions link to product pages for bunk beds and lawn furniture?).Google, of course, penalized Overstock.com big time. These penalties were part of the reason why Overstock.com’s revenue dropped by $1.05 billion in 2011.J. C. Penney sees ranking for “living room furniture” drop from #1 to #68 in a matter of hours after Google penaltyAnother retail company, another link-building scheme. In this case, it’s theorized that J. C. Penney, or the SEO firm that worked for them, bought the company into a paid link network.As a result of participating in the network, the retailer received such an astronomical amount of inbound links — which targeted very specific keyword phrases — that the J. C. Penney site was ranking first for, well, almost everything. This came across as suspicious to some, including journalist David Segal.For the full scoop, you’ll definitely want to check out his New York Times piece on the subject, “The Dirty Little Secrets of Search.” For the abridged version, I think one of the most fascinating aspects of this case was how fast Google was able to take action and drop J. C. Penney’s search rankings. Within hours, they were ranking in the high 60s and 70s for search terms that they used to rank first for (including “living room furniture” and “Samsonite carry on luggage”).So for those of you who’ve ever thought about dabbling in paid link-building networks, take heed. Google knows what’s up, and will bring the pain if it needs to.Rap Genius loses 80% of its traffic after Google uncovers link-building scheme We all know that getting backlinks (a.k.a. inbound links) from trusted websites is a great way to give your website’s search rankings a boost. However, as the lyrics website Rap Genius would discover, the method you use to generate those backlinks is of considerable importance. If your website is attracting links because you regularly create stellar content and people in your industry love you and they always share and link to your stuff, then guess what? You’re golden! Google will give you a pat on the back.However, if you’re attracting links by regularly sending out spammy emails that instruct people to link to specific pages of yours, Google’s going to bring the heat.Rap Genius went so far as to develop a network of bloggers who received publicity for their posts in exchange for including links to specific song lyrics on the Rap Genius site. This “affiliate program,” as Rap Genius called it, didn’t fly with Google, especially since the lyrics the blogs linked to rarely aligned with the actual content of the posts.As a result of this scheme, Google delivered a punishing blow to Rap Genius’s search rankings, and — for a short while — the company lost 80% of its daily organic traffic.Fortunately for Rap Genius, Google is willing to forgive. After publicly admitting that their SEO tactics were whack, and deconstructing their link-building network, Rap Genius was allowed back on Google’s search results pages.center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Marketers … we’re always looking for ways to make our metrics skyrocket up and to the right. We love our tips, tricks, hacks, “insider” secrets, and yes, we even love our performance-enhancing drugs (sips coffee).Where were we?Right … it seems we’re all so obsessed with improving and optimizing and driving results, that we’re sometimes tempted to break the rules. In the world of SEO, we call that using black hat tactics. And of course, we all think these black hat tactics are unfair or unethical and we never, ever use them.But here’s the thing: If black hat SEO can give your numbers a big boost and get you the results you need, why not go for it? I mean, what’s the worst that could happen?Spoiler alert: The worst that could happen is Google lands a direct hit on your search rankings with a flying roundhouse kick, your PageRank drops to 0, and you eventually get featured in a blog post (like this one) that’s filled with examples of companies that broke the rules and paid the price.Remember, as that influential marketing guy wrote in that famous book of his, “The Dark Side of the Force is the pathway to many abilities some consider to be … unnatural.”Actually, that’s from Star Wars. But the message is still relevant: You might hit your numbers using black hat tactics but, inevitably, Google’s going to notice that you’re doing something “unnatural.” And Google ain’t afraid to lay down the law.(Pssst. Want to make sure your website is squeaky clean? Check out our new guide, 10 SEO Mistakes to Avoid During Your Next Website Redesign.)The SEO Hall of Shame SEO Mistakeslast_img read more

The Step-by-Step Guide to SlideShare Marketing [Free Ebook]

first_img Topics: Originally published Jul 27, 2015 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 While many marketers are drawn to the visual nature of SlideShare (it is a popular platform for sharing visual content, after all), it’s important to remember that SlideShare marketing is both an art and a science.The art side of the equation, no doubt, is obvious: Creating a SlideShare presentation requires that you craft a compelling story, and then bring that story to life through the careful selection and arrangement of typefaces, colors, illustrations, photographs, and other elements.But then there’s the science side: Using SlideShare’s lead capture and analytics tools to enhance and analyze your presentations, so that you’re always learning and improving.In our new guide, The Step-by-Step Guide to SlideShare Marketing, you’ll find actionable instructions and advice, both for the “art stuff” (like using contrast to create visual separation between different elements) and the “science stuff” (like setting up lead capture forms and interpreting performance metrics).Not convinced that SlideShare is worth your time? Here’s the scoop: SlideShare in one of the top 100 most-visited sites in the world. And with more than 70 million users, it is a vast network that you can tap into and leverage for both lead generation and brand awareness.Whether you’re trying to get your first SlideShare marketing campaign off the ground, or you’re looking to redefine your existing SlideShare strategy, The Step-by-Step Guide to SlideShare Marketing can help.Have any SlideShare marketing tips or tricks you’d like to share? Leave a comment below! Presentations Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

We Documented Our Agency’s Mistakes Every Week for a Year. Here’s What We Learned.

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack This post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Agency Post. To read more content like this, subscribe to Agency Post.Every Friday, our team comes together for a weekly reflections meeting. It’s our “touchy-feely-kumbaya” moment where everyone has an opportunity to open up and share what’s on their mind.Primarily, we try to focus on three things: what went well, what didn’t go so well, and what we learned. We then document those lessons, and once-a-year, we review the key themes. It’s surprising– and a bit embarrassing — how often issues we discussed in March are repeated in August and again in November, but it’s all part of the learning process. This year, a few interesting themes emerged that I thought would be valuable for others to review. Here are some of the most important lessons we learned in 2015.1) Outline project unknowns as much as knowns.It’s very easy to find yourself putting together a beautiful project scope or proposal that painstakingly details every requirement the client has mentioned during your sales calls. The problem is, once the project kicks off, you’re going to find yourself dealing with many, many things the client did not explicitly state. Image purchasing, content implementation, hosting fees, etc., are all aspects of any web project not typically top-of-mind for the client. Be sure your contracts and documentation tackle as many of these project unknowns as possible. Include language that provides a means of factoring in cost/time when these little surprises sneak up, as they always do.2) Transition from managing a sales pipeline to a relationship pipeline.The idea of a sales pipeline is to track opportunities across various stages in your sales process, each with their own weighted likelihood of turning into an actual deal. Having a sales pipeline helps you determine where to invest time and energy in opportunities. The problem, however, is that most sales pipelines only look at a 30-to-90-day window. With this narrow of a view, it’s far too easy to cast “slower” opportunities to the side.We found that focusing on building relationships with companies that could be great clients, even if they’re a year away from that, is far more valuable than ignoring every prospect who doesn’t meet the perfect profile for your sales pipeline. You shouldn’t expel that much energy on these prospects, but you should set reminders to connect periodically, invite them to relevant events, and send them useful content. This can lead to huge returns beyond this month or even quarter. 3) Help define success for your customer.The reason most potential customers are speaking with you is because you’ve demonstrated a capacity for solving their problem. Embrace this truth, and control the vision for working with your customers. Focusing on identifying and addressing their needs is critical to a successful sale, but don’t let them dictate all the terms of engagement.You’ve done this “thing” far more times than they have, and it’s important that you explain what will make a project successful. If timelines are unrealistic or certain content or systems need to be finalized before you can start a project, be sure to communicate this to the client. It’s far better, and far more profitable, to set clear “rules for success” with a potential client and hold them to those boundaries. 4) Don’t overlook easy money.If your agency thrives on large project-based deals, it’s tempting to always go after the “whale” and ignore the “fish” along the way. If every new deal is six-figures, why wouldn’t you put your time and energy into those opportunities? However, when you focus 100% of your time on these big wins, you often sacrifice opportunities for “easy money.”Support retainers, appropriate technology recommendations that have a referral kickback, and one-day workshops are all value-added services you could offer existing clients. These relationships are already established so they don’t require the same effort as a new deal. Sure, the check isn’t as substantial, but if you build in a practice of upselling across all of your clients, you could see an impressive uptick in account size.5) Focus on solving problems, not just implementing solutions.It’s not uncommon to find that your team is obsessed with how to implement a specific solution within a project. Whether it stems from client interest or internal interest, once you’re fixated on making something work, it’s hard to take a step back. Taking a step back, however, is often the only way to avoid blowing the budget on a project. This step back should not be focused on re-evaluating the solution, rather re-evaluating the problem. Ask both yourself and the client what the exact problem is that you’re trying to solve and the impact of not solving it. Sometimes the solution is simply doing nothing.6) Don’t view account management and project management as the same role.Many larger agencies already have this baked into their operations, but this was a big lesson for us to learn this past year. Although they can sometimes be tackled by the same person, the responsibilities associated with account management are not the same as those associated with project management. Account managers need to focus on defending the client’s needs at all times while project managers need to focus on defending the agency’s needs at all times. This sort of conflict is healthy as it ensures both sides are properly represented in the creative process.In addition, the very metrics each role should be focused on are considerably different. Account managers are accountable for growing their book-of-business with clients while project managers are accountable for expanding the profitability of the relationship. These are two very different mindsets, and two very different roles.7) Always be selling.Once that initial contract is inked, it’s tempting to pop the champagne and call it a day. Closing a deal does not mean that the sales function is over. A client who accepts a contract simply means she believes in your plan for solving her problem; it does not guarantee that she believes in your execution of that plan. Every person involved in the project needs to realize the importance of continuing to sell ideas and solutions to identified problems. Every new deliverable is a new first impression.8) Realize the difference between makers and managers.There is a big difference between “makers” and “managers” within an agency. Makers are responsible for creating deliverables and executing the plan for a client. Managers are responsible for setting that plan and ensuring resources are appropriately allocated to enable execution. Many agencies depend on their team members to play both a maker and manager role. Effectiveness as a maker requires long, uninterrupted time where execution can take place. Effectiveness as a manager requires continued communication and performance analysis to ensure the plan is on track. Treat team members differently depending on the role they play and their responsibilities, and respect the differing work needs of each type within the structure of your agency.9) Work in time blocks.Most tasks will take as long as you allow them to. And complicating this problem is that in most agencies, we’re inundated with so many tasks from so many different accounts that things are constantly done right before they’re due. Working in a reactive pattern, where tasks are constantly being shuffled around based on the latest fire or ASAP request, only perpetuates inadvertent procrastination. Take control of your workload by carving out distinct blocks of time to tackle projects, and set the end of that block as your hard deadline.10) Repeat everything. Repeat everything.Repetition is a key ingredient for success as an agency. This includes repetition in communication, resources, and process. Repetition in communication ensures everyone is on the same page and that expectations are met. Repeat those expectations, and repeat the plan for meeting them. Repetition in resources ensures you have a game plan should someone go on vacation, get sick, or quit a project. Having redundant roles is an important safety net for any project. Finally, repetition in process ensures that you create repeatable results and start building efficiency into your delivery. The more your processes repeat, the more likely they can be automated, leading to tremendous gains in efficiency and profitability. 11) Manage against scope or timeline, not both.Bumps come up in a project. Unexpected requests or roadblocks are inevitable. Budget is often that hardest thing to revisit in a project, so consider whether scope or timeline needs to be re-evaluated as problems emerge. If timing is critical, scale back on what needs to be accomplished within a specific timeframe. If completeness is key, push out your launch date. If the client can’t choose between the two, bring up money again.12) Negotiate constantly, but wisely.Remember this: You’re negotiating throughout the entire lifespan of a project. You’re negotiating for extra resources, reduced scope, quicker turnarounds, etc. As in any negotiation, the key to success is knowing all of the terms of which you’re negotiating. It’s far easier to get what you need from a client and still make them happy if you give them something they want. When faced with a significant problem in the project, ensure you understand what’s really important to the client and what’s really important to your agency. Oftentimes, negotiating over different terms and bringing awareness to that is all it takes for everyone to walk away happy.13) Have a process, but know that the process will change.Technology, experience, resources, and many other factors will lead to evolutions in your processes over time. You’ll add new deliverables, cut out unnecessary steps, and automate some of your workload. But this sort of benefit only works when you have a process that you’re currently using. You can only measure improvement or evaluate efficiency if you have a benchmark. If you have a process for how your projects are delivered and how your agency is run, you can track and improve things going forward.14) Build in padding for inaccurate project estimates. It seems no matter how many times we’ve done a project, something always comes up that affects our original project estimate. Perhaps it’s a desire to continue improving our processes or “one-upping” our last project, but things inevitably take longer than expected. Understand this, embrace this, and add padding to be conservative. Extra time and extra money provides room to over-deliver for your clients and make them even happier with the project’s outcome.15) Remember that contractors are not employees.In a world of specialization and the need for ever-changing scale, it’s likely that your agency depends on some sort of contract-based labor force. They provide the natural capacity necessary to take on larger projects or unknown technologies. For this very reason, contractors can be one of your greatest assets.However, remember that they are not employees and should not be treated as such. Employment and tax regulation aside, professional freelancers and contractors have chosen that profession for many of the benefits that come with it: unlimited vacation, remote working, schedule independence, etc. It’s foolish to expect that contractors will make the same sacrifices or meet the same demands as an employee. As such, it’s critical that you establish clear expectations on the “softer side of your relationship in addition to the scope, time, and budget requirements you’re bound to discuss. Agree on communication schedules, deadline management, and anything else that might cause a problem for a project down-the-line.16) Show, don’t tell.As agency folk, we’re participants in the “idea economy.” We’re paid for coming up with and executing ideas that will solve our clients’ problems. Clients are our lifeblood, and they command respect in the creative process. However, we cannot assume that the ideas in our minds are the same as those perceived by our clients. Hypothetical pitches and explanations might get people excited, but it doesn’t lead to consensus around expectations.Don’t be afraid to introduce working deliverables into your process solely to serve as a means of crystallizing ideas into a form that has boundaries. Even a napkin sketch will give a client a better sense for your vision than flowery language over a bourbon-fueled dinner. If the client is excited about an idea, she should be excited to spend 5% of the total time/money to sketch out the parameters of that idea before committing to it fully.17) Promote others first.Imagine going to a party where the guy in the corner is constantly shouting about all of the awesome things he’s done. It won’t take long for you to excuse yourself from the table. The same goes for your marketing efforts. If all of your marketing is focused on promoting how “awesome” your agency is, how long will it take for your audience to leave? Focus your marketing on educating and sharing the success of others before your own. It builds trust and credibility. It also builds community as those you promote will promote your work in turn.18) Do less marketing to do better marketing.It’s easy to start the year with a huge list of marketing activities your agency will pursue to expand your footprint: blogging, events, emails, advertisements, podcast, sponsorships, etc. It all sounds great on paper, but such a diffused strategy is more likely to lead to a bunch of smaller failures than one or two major successes. Figure out what channels resonate with your target clients, align these with your voice/skillsets, and determine how you can maximize the impact with the limited resources you have at your disposal. Double-down on those few things, and ignore everything else.19) Find the source of the stress.Agency life is fueled by deadlines and tight budgets. No one has ever claimed it’s a stress-free business. But letting this stress affect us leads to poor performance, which leads to more stress. When you find yourself feeling as though every project is going wrong, the problem is unlikely that everything sucks.Take a step back, and identify what the real source of stress is. Then, create an action plan for dealing with it. Is it personal? Did you lose a deal? Is a client being pushy? Not resolving the major stressor in your life will impact other responsibilities on your plate. Tackle the real source of stress, and everything else might just be a bit easier.20) Celebrate your accomplishments.You’ve won awards, generated millions of dollars in value for your clients, and created jobs that give people the opportunity to pursue their creative passions. Running an agency can be overwhelming, but it is also incredibly rewarding. Do not let the challenges of running the business overshadow the successes along the way. Take time to step back and celebrate wins individually and as a team. Reflect on how much has been accomplished during just one year, and use that to fuel your work going forward. Topics: Agency Marketing Originally published Feb 27, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

How Stressed Are You Right Now? [Flowchart]

first_imgIn small doses, stress can actually be an important part of our lives. It can motivate us and make us more productive. And, once it’s over, we might come out of that stressful situation all the better for it.Too much stress, though, can be detrimental to your health, happiness, productivity, and relationships.So what’s that healthy balance between being too stressed, and being not stressed enough? Is your current stress level manageable and healthy?To help you figure out where you are on the stress scale (and what you can do about it), the folks over at Pound Place created the flowchart below. Start with the question at the top, and then follow the arrows to work your way to the bottom, where you’ll find out whether your stress is at a manageable level. 94Save94SaveSo … how stressed are you? Share your thoughts with us in the comments.  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Apr 8, 2016 7:00:00 AM, updated April 20 2017 Work Life Balance Topics:last_img read more

What Do Agency Employees Really Want? [Survey]

first_img Agency Talent How do agency employees view the importance of work, play, and balancing the two?What expectations do they have from their agency employers, and how do they view their own responsibilities?How do they compare the pros and cons of working in an agency versus in a client-side organization?How did they first choose to work in an agency, and how likely would they be to recommend an agency career to others?Which features and benefits of an agency career are most important to them?Do millennial employees actually feel differently about work than other age groups?How can agency owners better understand their employees and offer them features and benefits they will value? Employees are the lifeblood of the agency business, and maintaining a productive and engaged workforce is one of the most challenging aspects of running an agency. But it can be hard for owners to understand the attitudes and goals of an increasingly diverse workforce, and employees may find it difficult to give honest feedback anonymously.To find out how the attitudes of agency employees shape their goals and opinions about agency work, HubSpot is partnering in a new Agency Employee Attitudes Survey.The survey is anonymous, and should take less than 15 minutes to complete. Respondents who participate by September 15th can enter to win a $250 Amazon.com gift card.TAKE THE AGENCY EMPLOYEE SURVEYThe results of this study will be presented at INBOUND 2016 in November.The Agency Employee Attitudes Survey explores topics such as: All participants can get free access to the results, which will be shared for the first time at HubSpot’s INBOUND Conference in November 2016. Topics: Originally published Aug 31, 2016 5:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

The Marketer’s Guide to Facebook Live [Free Guide]

first_imgAt a conference in June, a Facebook VP said that in five years time the platform would be “all video.” That’s a bold statement, but it’s not unbelievable if you’ve scrolled through your News Feed lately.And one of the biggest drivers behind the growing prevalence of video is Facebook Live, which only was introduced in April of this year, but has since become a major distribution channel for both publishers and brands. Mashable has promised to stream 35 hours of live video per month, and The New York Times is streaming four live broadcasts every day, according to Advertising Age. These in-the-moment, authentic videos are capturing the attention of Facebook users, and it’s time to take advantage of the feature for your own brand. Going live on Facebook isn’t complicated — the platform has made it so anyone can stream with their mobile device and access to the internet. But there are a few best practices for live streaming, promoting your event, and driving engagement that will ensure your broadcast impresses your audience and drives new fans to your brand. Learn how to start broadcasting with our new online guide — The Guide to Facebook Live. In this guide, you’ll get:Tips on setting up your next live streamInspiration on the types of content to broadcastStrategies for driving viewers to your Live eventClick here to download your copy of The Guide to Facebook Live today. Facebook Marketing Originally published Oct 6, 2016 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Demi Lovato Brings Mental Health Front And Center During Tour

first_img Twitter The GRAMMY nominee is raising awareness for mental health while on tour through her CAST on Tour program, which kicked off Feb. 26 in San DiegoRenée FabianGRAMMYs Feb 27, 2018 – 2:24 pm As she embarks on her Tell Me You Love Me tour in support of her 2017 album of the same name, Demi Lovato isn’t just sharing her inspirational music with fans around the world, she’s making a difference by raising awareness for mental health.For the second consecutive tour, the GRAMMY nominee is again bringing along CAST on Tour, an initiative of the mental health advocacy organization CAST Foundation. She previously teamed with the recovery center during last year’s co-headlining Future Now tour with Nick Jonas.The pre-show sessions will allow Lovato and Mike Bayer, founder/CEO of CAST Centers and chairman of the CAST Foundation, to discuss mental health awareness while giving space to attendees to share their own personal experiences with mental illness.The initiative kicked off Feb. 26 in San Diego, where Lovato invited student survivors of the recent school shooting in Parkland, Fla., to attend the session. Lovato also brought the students — Julius Castillo, Mackenzie Marie Chapman, Samantha Megan Deitsch, Maia Hebron, Eden Hebron, and Sarah Stricker — onstage during her performance later in the evening, in addition to inviting the audience to donate toward mental health resources for the students impacted by the school shooting through a CAST Foundation text donation.Tonight is the night! We also have #CASTontour back!! Make sure you guys are following @castcenters and @castontour on Instagram for a chance to join us and see who is speaking — Demi Lovato (@ddlovato) February 26, 2018CAST on Tour will follow Lovato for 20 tour dates, including stops Las Vegas, Phoenix, Dallas, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Philadelphia, among others, concluding on March 31 in Tampa, Fla. Lovato’s world tour, with special guests DJ Khaled and Kehlani, will continue around the globe through June 27.”Bringing CAST on Tour was very important to me because I want to be able to reach and inspire my fans. Tonight was our first night of the tour and it was incredibly special,” Lovato said in a statement. “I was able to bring out and meet a few of the students that had to experience the shooting in Florida on the 14th. It was such an honor to meet them and hear their courageous stories. I want to make sure their voices are being heard and we can provide them with the mental health and post-trauma care they need.”Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Email Facebook Demi Lovato Advocates For Mental Health On Tour demi-lovato-brings-mental-health-front-and-center-during-tour Demi Lovato Brings Mental Health Front And Center During Tour News last_img read more

Simbu to join hands with Singam director Hari

first_imgSimbu in Vantha Rajavathaan Varuven.PR HandoutSimbu has returned to Chennai from London last week to attend his younger brother Kuralarasan’s wedding. The actor looks fit and fine in his new get-up for his upcoming movie Maanadu, directed by Venkat Prabhu.The actor, after witnessing a downhill in his career for a few years, bounced back with Mani Ratnam’s Chekka Chivantha Vaanam. Although his next film Vantha Rajavathaan Varuven failed to set the box office on fire, he has been getting a lot of good offers.The latest film to come his way is from director Hari, the creator of Singam series. As per the buzz, leading producer AM Rathnam has come forward to fund the project and the initial talks have started. According to sources, nothing is firmed up at this stage and both the parties will be in a stage to talk about the project.It may be recalled that Simbu had worked with Hari in Kovil.Currently, Simbu is preparing for Venkat Prabhu’s film and lost 13 kgs in a span of 37 days. He has reportedly given nod to play the role of MR Radha in his biopic. He will be teaming up with Arvind Swami in the flick, directed by Ike.last_img read more

Youth stabbed to death over mobile phone

first_imgIllustrationA youth was stabbed to death and another was injured over a mobile phone in Sherpur upazilla of Bogra on Wednesday night.The deceased is Abbas Ali, 24, from Mohipur Jamtala village in Sherpur upazilla.Injured Md Faruk, 15, a Class-X student, was under treatment at Sherpur Upazilla Health Complex.Police have detained a youth, Niyamul Haque, 19, on suspect of his involvement with the incident. He disclosed names of five persons involved with the stabbing.Quoting Niyamul, Sherpur police station inspector Bulbul Islam said Maruf and Shakil, 19, from Mohipur had an enmity over an old mobile phone set. On Wednesday night, Maruf’s friend Abbas had an altercation with Shakil over the phone set.At a stage of the altercation, Shakil’s friend Al Amin stabbed Abbas and Maruf indiscriminately in Bottola Bazar area of Mohipur village, leaving them injured critically.Locals rushed Abbas to Shaheed Ziaur Rahman Medical College Hospital where physicians declared him dead on arrival.Family of the deceased said they would file a murder case.Sherpur police station office-in-charge Khan Md Erfan said police were trying to arrest other suspects.last_img read more

Want to Cheat the System Call Yourself a Tech Company

first_img 3 min read Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now August 22, 2016 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.center_img A variety of factors contributed to Theranos’s prolonged public deception, though they’re often summed up by “tech hype.” The company’s founder, Elizabeth Holmes, was a Stanford dropout who dreamed of “making a difference in the world.” Her company was valued at nearly $10 billion. She was hailed as the “next Steve Jobs.”Blogger and media entrepreneur Anil Dash explains that Theranos successfully drummed up buzz about its faulty products “because the company, its founder and its investors all shielded themselves under the cultural cover of being a glamorous member of the ‘tech industry’ rather than a prosaic medical supplier.”Related: The 10 Best U.S. Cities for Tech JobsIt’s absurd to refer to companies that specialize in vastly disparate goods and services all under the umbrella of “tech,” Dash argues in a Medium post titled, “There is no ‘technology industry.’” If Theranos had been treated as a blood-testing company rather than a tech company, his argument follows, it would have been under far more scrutiny from day one.It’s not simply an imprecise description, Dash notes. He emphasizes that this overarching label obscures the reality that there is no such thing as the tech industry, in terms of a common set of regulations for the companies that supposedly exist within it.“Mature industries develop their own regulatory frameworks, their own systems for self-regulation, and their own standards for monitoring transgressions within the industry,” Dash writes. “Today, tech as an industry is almost completely lacking in all of these areas.”In other words, a “tech company” in pursuit of “disruption” is not exempt from the law. See: Uber and its disregard for background checks based on its self-designation as a technology company rather than a taxi service.Obviously Dash is not the first to make the argument that the tech industry is a misnomer for a nonexistent collective. In a May 2012 Slate piece, “It’s Official: There’s No Such Thing as a Tech Company,” journalist Matt Yglesias wrote of Apple and Amazon, “they’re in different lines of business, so there’s no ex ante reason to expect them to [be] valued in a similar way.”In March 2013, reporter David Yanofsky wrote in Quartz, “To stay competitive in today’s marketplaces, every company, by the current standard, could be called a tech company, which of course, is another way of saying that none of them should be.”Related: 10 Tech Companies to Watch – Entrepreneur’s Brilliant 100Yet in the third quarter of 2016, the phrase “tech industry” persists, as companies continue to incorporate technology, in the broadest most literal sense of the word, into their business operations and consumer products. Now that technology is omnipresent, it’s time to start conceiving of tech companies based on their sub-industries — transportation, information, food and beverage — and impose restrictions on them based on the specific services they provide.Every company occupies the “business” space, but society does not treat all of these companies as though they exist on the same plane. The same should be true of “tech.” Embrace the reality that your company is more than a “tech company” and establish what differentiates you from all of the tech startup bandwagoners out there. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

Googles Project Zero reveals a High severity copyonwrite security flaw found in

first_imgA Security researcher from Google’s Project Zero team recently revealed a high severity flaw in the macOS kernel that allows a copy-on-write (COW) behavior, a resource-management technique, also referred to as shadowing. The researcher informed Apple about the flaw back in November 2018, but the company is yet to fix it even after exceeding the 90-day deadline. This is the reason why the bug is now being made public with a “high severity” label. According to a post on Monorail, the issue tracking tool is for chromium-related projects, “The copy-on-write behavior works not only with anonymous memory but also with file mappings. This means that, after the destination process has started reading from the transferred memory area, memory pressure can cause the pages holding the transferred memory to be evicted from the page cache. Later, when the evicted pages are needed again, they can be reloaded from the backing filesystem.” “This means that if an attacker can mutate an on-disk file without informing the virtual management subsystem, this is a security bug. MacOS permits normal users to mount filesystem images. When a mounted filesystem image is mutated directly (e.g. by calling pwrite() on the filesystem image), this information is not propagated into the mounted filesystem”, the post further reads. According to a Google project member, “We’ve been in contact with Apple regarding this issue, and at this point no fix is available. Apple is intending to resolve this issue in a future release, and we’re working together to assess the options for a patch. We’ll update this issue tracker entry once we have more details.” A user commented on HackerNews, “Given the requirements that a secondary process should even be able to modify a file that is already open, I guess the expected behavior is that the 1st process’s version should remain cached in memory while allowing the on-disk (CoW) version to be updated? While also informing the 1st process of the update and allowing the 1st process to reload/reopen the file if it chooses to do so. If this is the intended/expected behavior, then it follows that pwrite() and other syscalls should inform the kernel and cause prevent the origional cache from being flushed.” To know more about this news, head over to the bug issue post. Read Next Drupal releases security advisory for ‘serious’ Remote Code Execution vulnerability Google’s home security system, Nest Secure’s had a hidden microphone; Google says it was an “error” Firedome’s ‘Endpoint Protection’ solution for improved IoT securitylast_img read more