High-Heel-A-Thon supports hospital

first_imgJunior Libbie Gilliland sprinted 50 yards in her favorite pair of high heels Monday night. Gilliland, sporting the black heels decorated with silver bells and pearls, took first place in the second annual High-Heel-A-Thon sponsored by the Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon. The proceeds from the race benefit the Riley Hospital for Children, which has 19 locations throughout Indiana. Gilliland said the race is an innovative way to support the hospital’s work. “I did the High-Heel-A-Thon because I have medical conditions,” Gilliland said. “Even though I go to a hospital in the Chicago area, Riley Hospital still holds the same concept. It’s a great way for me to give back.” Dance Marathon president senior Becca Guerin said the High-Heel-A-Thon contributes to the overall goal of the marathon that will be hosted later in the year. Each high-heeled runner paid a $5 entry fee. “The people who ultimately benefit from our fundraisers like the High-Heel-A-Thon are the patients and families of Riley’s Children Hospital,” Guerin said. “It is gratifying to know that the funds we raise will make a direct impact at Riley.” The College hopes to increase its overall contribution to the hospital this year. Last year, the marathon raised over $63,000 for Riley Children’s Hospital, Guerin said. “This year, our monetary goal is to increase last year’s total by 20 percent,” she said. Juniors Kate Kellogg and Liz Kraig, co-executives for Dance Marathon fundraising, planned the race. “It’s a fun event to get the campus excited about Dance Marathon,” Kellogg said. “The idea is just to create awareness throughout the year. The High-Heel-A-Thon works perfectly in the ‘classy and fabulous’ atmosphere of Saint Mary’s.” Junior Nora Quirk finished second and junior Sarah Feeley took third. Students who attended to watch the event were aware of the impact made at Riley Children’s Hospital. Junior Christina Barra said many members of the College support the Dance Marathon in some way. “Dance Marathon is a great cause,” Barra said. “It’s great to see all the support from the Saint Mary’s community.”last_img read more

‘Thorough’ probe sought on NAIA plane crash that killed 8

first_imgInvestigators gather around burnt Lion Air plane at Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila late night on Sunday. Eight persons, including two foreign nationals, were perished in the crash. EPA MANILA – Malacañang on Monday called fora “thorough” investigation of the accident involving a medical evacuation planethat burst into flames during takeoff at the Ninoy Aquino International Airporton Sunday. Eight persons, including two foreignnationals, were perished in the crash, the Manila International AirportAuthority (MIAA) said. However, despite its airworthiness,Mendoza said that they are looking into the possibility of grounding Lionair’swhole fleet, as it also operated another medical evacuation aircraft whichcrashed in Calamba last September 2019. MIAA General Manager Ed Monreal said thepassengers were on a medical evacuation mission on board Agusta WW24 aircraftto Haneda, Japan when the incident took place at around 8 p.m. The MIAA said the accident happened atthe end of the runway 06/24 as the aircraft was taking off. Its fire and rescueteam was immediately dispatched to extinguish the flames that engulfed theplane but unable to save the passengers. Monreal, however, did not reveal thereason for the medical evacuation mission to Japan. The investigation wereunderway but initial findings by the Civil Aviation Authority of thePhilippines (CAAP) said that the aircraft reportedly encountered a technicalproblem. “There must be a thorough investigationof the incident and the concerned government agencies must undertake measuresto secure the safety of private aircraft as well as their passengers and crew,”Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo said. CAAP Deputy Director General Don Mendozasaid the aircraft, operated by Lionair, is airworthy as it came from Iloilo onSaturday to deliver medical supplies. The licenses of the pilot are current. The passengers of the aircrafts were sixFilipinos – three flight crew, a flight medic, a doctor and a nurse – aCanadian national (the patient) and American national (companion of thepatient). “Right now the initial step that we arelooking into is grounding the whole fleet. It’s quite alarming, but we arelooking into the records of this unfortunate event that happened to Lionair,”Mendoza said./PNlast_img read more

How Trevor Cooney is helping Syracuse score, without scoring himself

first_img Published on November 24, 2015 at 6:32 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+ Before the season, Trevor Cooney was confident that a roster full of shooters would give him more opportunities to score.“I definitely think I, personally, can only benefit from us having more shooters this year,” Cooney said at Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Media Day on Oct. 28. “The shots I am going to take are going to be better and the whole floor will be opened up for everybody to make more things happen. I think it will allow me to score more honestly.”But through Syracuse’s first three games, teams have stayed glued to Cooney on the perimeter despite the Orange’s other threats. In turn, he’s created for his teammates more than they’ve created for him. Heading into SU’s (3-0) 2:30 p.m. date with Charlotte (1-2) in the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament on Wednesday, the fifth-year senior has made just six of 20 3-pointers and is averaging a misleading 13 points per game.His scoring average is boosted by an 18-point game against St. Bonaventure in which he shot 8-of-11 from the free-throw line. As for scoring from the perimeter, Cooney’s opportunities have been limited and he’s been most effective going to the rim.“In years past I haven’t attacked the rim and I just settled with just passing the ball around,” Cooney said after Syracuse beat Elon, 66-55, on Saturday. “I’m happy to be aggressive and attacking, and it’s created a lot more for this team which is good.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the offseason, Cooney worked on his ball-handling with SU assistant coach Gerry McNamara. The drills were aimed at making Cooney, known as a spot-up a shooter, a more versatile scorer. He’s said that he feels much more comfortable putting the basketball on the floor.That was evident against Elon, when Cooney regularly attacked the rim in the second half. He missed his only 3-point attempt in the first half on a contested look, and his penetration helped the Orange score 10 points in the paint in the last 20 minutes. Cooney also saw a lapse in perimeter pressure on a Michael Gbinije drive, and knocked down an open 3.“Him getting to the rack, it opens things up for the bigs and the other guards,” Gbinije, SU’s starting point guard, said. “Teams aren’t expecting him to do that, they’re chasing him off the line and he’s going in there and that’s going to benefit us.”After Syracuse beat the Phoenix, head coach Jim Boeheim said the team isn’t getting Cooney enough good looks. And while that may be true so far this season, this year’s Orange is reliant on Cooney and more likely to benefit from the attention he draws.When teams blanketed him last year, it created opportunities for Ron Patterson, Kaleb Joseph and a timid Tyler Roberson. But when Elon switched on every first-half down screen Syracuse gave Cooney, Roberson found mismatches and open space, and finished with a career-high 20 points.In the coming games, teams that pressure Cooney will also hand jump shots to Gbinije and freshman Malachi Richardson. Then he can drive to the basket and the offense will open up more.“I would hope guys guard me the same way as they did last year,” Cooney added in October, “and that will create even more things for other people.”So far that’s what’s happened. It hasn’t led to more points on his stat lines, but will have unseen effects on others. Commentslast_img read more