Clarendon College on the hunt

first_imgWestern Bureau:Reigning daCosta Cup champions Clarendon College return to action this afternoon with a Group H game against Thompson Town High with three points on their minds.On 7 points, the Paul ‘Tegat’ Davis-coached Clarendon College will be hoping that top-of-the-table companions Lennon High either lose or get held to a draw in their game against Edwin Allen (6 pts).Clarendon has been enjoying some amount of rest having last played on September 19, and will be confident when facing a home team that is second from bottom in the group standings on 3 points.St Elizabeth Technical (STETHS) will have their toughest test of the campaign so far when they host Group E leaders Lacovia High at their Santa Cruz field.Lacovia on ten points, lead ahead of B.B. Coke also on ten points with STETHS, last year’s beaten finalists in third on 8 points, but their 6-0 victory over Newell on Thursday will provide a much needed confidence boost for the Omar Wedderburn-coached team.Wedderburn told The Gleaner that his team, although suffering a few setbacks, are still one of the teams to contend with and are still on course to topping the group.”It’s one game at a time for us, and although we have not been getting the kind of results we all desire, we are still in line to top the group,” said Wedderburn.Other Group E matches include Newell versus B.B. Coke, while Munro College take on Maggotty High in a crucial game.Spot Valley versus Muschett High could produce fireworks. The Group C leaders, on four and three points respectively are set to meet at the Muschett home field, while Herbert Morrison should get the better of a William Knibb side that is struggling for consistency.Third-place Herbert Morrison will take form in that match with William Knibb and the Falmouth-based school are on a single point after two matches and need a victory to kick-start their season.Today’s matchesGroup AIrwin vs Green PondGroup BGreen Island vs CambridgeRusea’s vs. Merlene OtteyGroup CHerbert Morrison vs William KnibbMuschett vs Spot ValleyGroup DMannings vs Godfrey StewartMaud McLeod vs Little LondonGroup ESTETHS vs LacoviaNewell vs B.B. CokeMunro vs MaggottyGroup FManchester vs Cross KeysDeCarteret vs BelairWinston Jones vs Mile GullyGroup GHolmwood vs SpaldingKnox vs AlstonBellefield vs ChristianaGroup HThompson Town vs Clarendon CollegeLennon vs Edwin AllenGroup ISteer Town vs Marcus GarveyCedric Titus vs Ocho RiosYork Castle vs Brown’s TownGroup JSt Mary Tech vs IslingtonBrimmervale vs TackyAnnotto Bay vs St Mary HighGroup KBog Walk vs CharlemontMcGrath vs EwartonTacius Golding vs DinthillGroup LPort Antonio vs TitchfieldBuff Bay vs Fair ProspectGroup MGlenmuir vs DenighPorus vs Garvey MaceoGroup NVere Tech vs Foga RoadKemps Hill vs CentralGroup OPaul Bogle vs Morant BayRobert Lightbourne vs St Thomas Techlast_img read more

Amgen’s cycle of Fresno-slapping must stop

first_imgI don’t have the faintest idea why my former hometown – technically, I grew up 10 miles south in a hamlet called Fowler but I’ve never been able to extricate Fresno from the deepest recesses of my heart and soul – has been cruelly shunned for the second straight year, but I must sheepishly confide that I’m not exactly a connoisseur of cycling. Indeed, my knowledge of it is quite limited, since it’s not exactly a pursuit that ever has ranked high on my priority list. The only time I ever bothered to use a bicycle on a regular basis was to ride it from my home to my elementary school, which, to put it mildly, was so long ago that memory of the experience has become hopelessly clouded. I do know that a lot of guys get kicked out of the sport for using illegal substances. I do know that Lance Armstrong won all sorts of Tour de France titles – I think it was seven in a row – and that he, too, has been relentlessly shadowed by dark accusations. I do know that cyclists are a different breed with their garish apparel that looks as though it has been designed by those who once served as haberdashers for Bozo the Clown. I do know that there is almost a tribal attitude among its practitioners, who savor training together, as well as breakfasting together after early morning workouts and also have a haughty disregard for joggers who happen to share their pathways. I do know Amgen is the world’s largest biotechnology company, and that its title sponsorship has been a source of, eh, increased blood pressure among critics because it happens to be the company that pioneered the genetically engineered form of EPOGEN, the recombinant form of erythropoietin that stimulates the body’s production of red blood cells. Popularly known as EPO, it has proved to be a successful remedy for those cancer and kidney patients suffering from anemia. But it also the past 16 years has proved to be a successful additive for a variety of athletes, especially cyclists and long-distance runners who have illegally used it to increase their oxygen uptake. There are those who feel having Amgen as a title sponsor for a major cycling event is roughly tantamount to, say, Jack Daniel’s serving as a title sponsor at an Alcoholics Anonymous convention. That might be a slightly extreme view, although it seems as though a good portion of those cycling in recent years have wound up being suspended, including last year’s Tour De France victor, Floyd Landis, who is appealing that drug test he took that came up positive moments after his stirring win. Landis won’t be in Long Beach this weekend, but there will be a lot of other guys who are quite skilled in pedaling a bicycle at extraordinary speeds, as they will do 10 laps around the 7.75-mile course here that starts at Ocean and Shoreline Drive and winds around Belmont Shore. There figures to be a Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach ambiance to the proceedings, especially in the restaurants up, down and around Pine Avenue on Saturday evening when all sorts of festivities are going to be staged in the area. Of course, a bicycle race doesn’t quite have the same riveting mystique of an Indy car race where the drivers hit nearly 200 mph on the straightaways and where more than 100,000 patrons can line the Long Beach circuit, but it still should have intriguing drama, especially as one awaits the results of the winner’s post-race drug test. Still, one can’t help but shed a tear of despair for beleaguered Fresno, Paris by the Sierras that continues for some unfathomable reason to be ignored by those sporting mandarins lacking the sophisticated discernment to detect its bejeweled persona. Doug Krikorian can be reached at doug.krikorian@presstelegram.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Of course, I’m talking about Fresno, the stunning metropolis that holds the sacred distinction of being located right in the middle of the fertile San Joaquin Valley in an area where perhaps more grapes are grown and more fast-food outlets are located per square block for the ravenously hungry, diet-disdaining populace than any locale in the world. So, while the cyclists go merrily through their stages – doing the Stockton-to-San Jose destination today – poor Fresno finds itself stuck in its eternal oblivion despite its multitude of offerings such as, well, a vast array of upscale strip malls, a modern baseball stadium for its Pacific Coast League team and a bewhiskered gentleman named Pat Hill who looks more like a Grand Ol’ Opry performer than a football coach, which he happens to be for the local university team that I believe racked up four big victories for him last fall. center_img Billed as an event in which the participants are able to navigate through some of the treasured garden spots of the state, the Amgen Tour of California, not to be confused with the Geologic Walking Tour of Building Stones of Downtown Baltimore, has committed a serious oversight in its eight-stage, 640-mile race that climaxes Sunday in Long Beach. While including such pearls of culture enhancement as San Francisco, Sausalito, Sacramento, San Luis Obispo, Solvang, Santa Barbara and our fair city in this titillating affair, those who administrate it somehow once again have snubbed one of the more alluring venues on this planet for reasons that confound those fortunate enough to reside in such a place of exotic beauty. last_img read more

Intrepid Connections partnership perfection

first_imgJacquie Burnside is eager to bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to her new role as GM of Intrepid Connections, a joint venture between Australian Pacific Touring (APT) and Intrepid Travel. Intrepid Connections partnered this year in a 50/50 joint split over the connections products Intrepid Travel had already been selling, combining more than 80 years of business experience. According to Ms Burnside, the partnership was a logical step in the relationship between both companies. “Intrepid and APT were already part-owners of Kimberly Wild Expeditions, so this joint venture was a perfect opportunity to expand our operations together,” she told e-Travel Blackboard. Ms Burnside has a storied history with Intrepid Travel and is confident her experience will aid in developing her new position as general manager. “I’m very much a generalist. “If you don’t have that broad understanding of the environment you work in and the people you work for, then it’s going to be tough to get a handle on the business,” Ms Burnside said. Intrepid Connections released their first brochure, Australia and New Zealand, in September 2010, expanding on their product range. “We wanted to present to new distributors as a wholly Australian operator and not rely solely on our already-developed Northern Territory market. “The new brochure and range reflects this stance,” Ms Burnside said. Smaller, more organised group trips are very popular throughout Asia and Intrepid Connections is attempting to foster this market in Australia and New Zealand. “We offer these types of holiday – seekers considerable depth in terms of interaction, knowledgeable guides and information. “Access is what sets us apart from our competitors; operating centres throughout the Kimberly and Northern Territory allows us to receive up-to-date information, ahead of time, which is a huge advantage for our customers,” Ms Burnside said. According to Intrepid Connections new GM, 2011 will be a year of consolidation. “We’re aiming to consolidate our efforts and bring our trade partners up to speed with our new non-territorial products and market developments.“There is noticeable growth within the Asian sector and we’re focusing on how to tap into these new and emerging markets over the next few years, while still providing value for money experiences to our customers,” Ms Burnside said. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: P.Tlast_img read more