Sorry Sharks fans, keeping Erik Karlsson in San Jose is going to be hard

first_img(CLICK HERE, if you are unable to view this photo gallery on your mobile device.)MONTREAL — Erik Karlsson is going to be hard to keep in San Jose, adding to the pressure the Sharks are under this season to finally win the Stanley Cup.When Sharks GM Doug Wilson acquired Karlsson on the eve of training camp, conventional wisdom suggested the Sharks would have the inside lane in the race to sign the two-time Norris Trophy winner when his contract expires after this season. NHL players who move …last_img

Greg Papa in, Radnich out: ‘It’s like replacing Johnny Carson’

first_imgThe new KNBR lineup: Do you love it or hate it?Love it — Change is goodHate it — Bring back Radnich and/or FitzDon’t care — I listen to 95.7 The GameI’m in a wait-and-see modeVoteView Results Take Our PollBay Area sportscaster Greg Papa made his mid-morning debut on KNBR (680-AM) Tuesday and started off by acknowledging Gary Radnich, the longtime station fixture he’s replacing.“Gary is the godfather of Bay Area sports-talk radio,” Papa told listeners. “… This is a little daunting. It’s a little …last_img

Eskom Expo for Young Scientists builds South Africa’s science capital

first_img16 October 2014Seesaws that pump water; lighting a city using solar power; improving crickets’ protein content to make food bars; these mind-blowing ideas were all conceived by young South African scientists and presented at the annual Eskom Expo for Young Scientists where “students have a chance to show others their projects about their own scientific investigations’.The expo was held from 8 to 10 October in Gauteng’s Boksburg. Endorsed by the Department of Public Enterprises, the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Science and Technology, the Young Scientists Expo invites some 17 700 pupils from across the country to compete for a ticket to the International Science Fair. The competition is stiff, with just the top 822 selected to represent their regions at national level.According to Parthy Chetty, the expo’s executive director, “South Africa wants to establish itself as a hub of science research and excellence. In order to do that South Africa needs to be producing outstanding scientists, researchers and technicians and attract top talent from around the world. By hosting young scientists from Africa we are exposing them to the exciting world of science in South Africa and we are starting to make that vision a reality.”The expo aims to support and showcase female scientists and young scientists from across the continent; this year it attracted 477 female participants, versus 345 male participants, with entrants coming from Namibia, Swaziland, Lesotho and Botswana. The students discussed their work with judges, teachers and students from other schools, expanding their horizons through broadening their science knowledge and growing peer networks.Naledi Pandor, minister for the department of science and technology, was at the event. She told the pupils to not limit their ambitions, but to “dream as widely as you can. There are immense challenges that confront South Africa but you can be part of resolving those challenges.’Eskom Chairman Zola Tsotsi presented the awards at the expo with Pandor; he said: “At Eskom we value the important role of education, as part of the solution we have invested in training and education to drive growth. Our country relies on innovation to break the shackles of poverty and to create wealth and the learners here today have the power to create a better life for the poor.”Eskom is South Africa’s electricity utility.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

DaVinci Resolve: THE Total Guide to the Best Free Video Editor

first_imgFind out everything you need to get started in DaVinci Resolve with this complete, six-part video guide to the best free video editor on the market.I don’t know about you, but I haven’t had a chance to master DaVinci Resolve yet. There are a lot of small details and techniques about Resolve that I’ve picked up from various videos over the years, but I haven’t been able to just sit down and take the time to learn the thing.DaVinci Resolve has always amazed me — what was once the industry-leading color grading software that only a small group of filmmaking professionals could use (or afford) became the industry’s best free editing software, and it is still the industry-leading color correction software.Image via Blackmagic Design.Yes, that’s right, DaVinci Resolve is a completely free download, and if you don’t have a copy of it on your machine, click here: DaVinci Resolve Download. (You’ll find the download link at the bottom of the page).It can be daunting to learn an entirely new NLE. Luckily, Lewis McGregor has our backs. Lewis is a certified Blackmagic trainer. So, just for you, he made a six-part video series that teaches you everything you need to know to get started. After you watch this series, you’ll be using the industry-standard color correction and editing software in no time.How to Organize and Import Media In ResolveOne of the first snags I always hit when I hop into Resolve is that I don’t really know the right way to get my media organized and into a bin. I’m so very used to the Premiere workflows — and previously Final Cut, from way back, which was relatively similar.Resolve is a bit different, but as McGregor shows us in this first episode, it’s not as different as it might initially seem. Creating a project and getting all of your media is very straightforward. There is a lot you can do with metadata and proxies, but it can also be simpler than that. It just depends on how you intend to use the software.After this video, I felt empowered to hop into Resolve and get started immediately.How to Use The Edit Page In ResolveAs someone who previously only used Resolve for color correcting a completed edit, I always had a little bit of trouble navigating the Edit Page.In this episode, Lewis explains everything about the Edit Page from a layout standpoint — and how to get everything in an interface that makes sense to you. He also covers the various parts of the page and what their purposes are.How to Edit Your Video In DaVinci ResolveNow we’re getting down to the nitty gritty. In this episode, we learn about the various tools for editing and fine-tuning directly on the timeline.In Resolve, it’s easy to find all of your favorite editing tools — trim tools, roll edit, ripple edit, slip edit, slide edit, and (of course) markers and flags.Once you get comfortable with the selection methods and the various edits, you’re pretty much on your way to doing everything you need editing-wise in Resolve.How to Edit Audio In DaVinci ResolveAudio is always one of the first reasons I don’t switch NLEs. Editing and controlling audio is a very nuanced process, and I feel like it’s one of the hardest things for an editor to master. You get used to doing it a specific way, and you start getting good results with your program of choice.In this episode, Lewis shows us how to edit audio in Resolve easily and effectively. As you’ll learn, Resolve actually offers one of the best sets of audio editing features of any NLE — the Fairlight audio page.After watching this video, you’ll be able to find all of the audio tools you need in Resolve — like the track mixer, EQ settings, pan mixer, etc.How to Render or Export In DaVinci ResolveNow that your edit is done, you need to know how to export it.In this episode, Lewis walks us through the Delivery Page. This is where you’ll find all of your rendering options. Resolve has included handy presets for various social platforms (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), which stay up to date with the respective platform’s suggestions.Aside from that, the render settings and options are exactly what you’re used to in any other editing software.How to Set Up Basic User Settings In DaVinci ResolveResolve gives you a lot of control when it comes to GPU usage and memory settings. There are also a lot of settings for playback and audio input and output. As you are probably used to with other editors you’ve used, these settings are all among the basic user settings.In this episode, Lewis covers all of these various settings. This way, you can put everything you’ve learned to good use — with all of the right settings for your machine.How to Color Correct and Color Grade in DaVinci ResolveAs an added bonus, we didn’t forget the thing we all know DaVinci Resolve for the most — color grading! In this video tutorial from RocketStock, Lewis shows us the ropes with the color side of Resolve. Check it out!Looking for even more information on DaVinci Resolve? Check out these articles and tutorials.Using the Track Select Forward Tool in DaVinci Resolve 15Color Grading Tips: The Ins and Outs of Correcting for a Pink SkyColor Grading: Working with the Hue vs. Curves in DaVinci ResolveRevive Your Footage With Resolve 15’s Automatic Dirt Repair and Dust Buster ToolsHow to Use the Shared Node Feature in DaVinci ResolveQuick Tip: How To Use Optimized Media In DaVinci ResolveRemove Unwanted Shot Features With Resolve 15’s Patch ReplacerGet To Know DaVinci Resolve 15’s Super Scale FeatureYour Guide to Working with Project Files in DaVinci Resolvelast_img read more

Vertebra, cervical (neck)

first_imgThese are the seven bones of the neck, called the cervical vertebra. The top bone, seen on the right of this picture, is called the atlas, and is where the head attaches to the neck. The second bone is called the axis, upon which the head and atlas rotate. The vertebra are numbered from one to seven from the atlas down, and are referred to as C1, C2, C3, etc.Review Date:4/16/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img

7 Clever Email Campaigns That Get Customers Buying Again

first_img Ecommerce Sales If you have a great product, customers will probably want to buy from you again. But that doesn’t mean they’ll always remember to. People are busy; no matter how much they love you, sometimes it’s just hard to keep in touch, you know? Which is why email remarketing campaigns are great ideas for those who have purchased (or almost purchased) from you in the past!What’s an email remarketing campaign, you ask? Pretty much what it sounds like … you send an email marketing campaign to a lead or customer in your database that encourages them to purchase from you again.Click here to download our free beginner’s guide to email marketing.And ecommerce businesses that don’t leverage remarketing campaigns are missing a huge revenue opportunity — according to Practical eCommerce, only 5% of new customers that make a purchase with a company return to the site, and only 3% make a second purchase. Them’s not good odds.But they can get better when you leverage email remarketing campaigns. Practical eCommerce also found that customers who have recently made a purchase on your site are more than twice as likely to return to your site and complete a purchase when they receive remarketing emails. Now those are numbers I can get behind.So to get you started with email remarketing, we’ve gathered some creative ideas for you to consider for your own email remarketing campaigns, all from real brands that are excelling with their own programs. Take a look, and get some inspiration so you can generate more revenue out of a contact database that already loves you!1) Abandoned Shopping CartWe’ll start with the most common email campaign used to recall customers to your website — the abandoned shopping cart email. Take a look at how HubSpot customer Shar Music gets in touch with customers who have almost completed a purchase on their website, but abandon their shopping cart at the last minute.This is just one in a series of three emails that Shar Music sends to an abandoned shopping cart customer to encourage them to return to the site and complete their purchase. A key takeaway of this abandoned shopping cart email is how easy they’ve made it for the recipient to understand the purpose of the email, and to act on it. The design isn’t fancy; it doesn’t need to be. It simply asks, “Can we help you with anything?” in bold letters that stand out from the rest of the email, and provides a large call-to-action button at the end that makes it easy for the recipient to return to their shopping cart and complete their purchase.If abandoned shopping cart emails aren’t part of your email remarketing strategy yet, they’re some seriously low-hanging fruit; just make sure to follow up with an abandoned shopping cart customer quickly. An MIT study via SeeWhy showed that 90% of ecommerce leads go cold within one hour, but when remarketed to, spend 55% more!2) Wishlist SaleAlways a fantastic email remarketer (their campaigns will appear in this post a few times), ModCloth has leveraged its “Wishlist” feature to remarket to their customers. You know the wishlist — many ecommerce sites let you bookmark items that you really like, but perhaps aren’t ready to purchase. It’s common for customers to do this when they’re researching options from multiple businesses, or when they see something they would like to get, but certainly don’t need. Until they get this remarketing email, of course:When customers are comparison shopping or unwilling to complete the purchase of something they like, price is often a factor. This remarketing campaign is genius because it addresses that purchase blocker by alerting me that something I wish I could have is now on sale. If I wasn’t willing to buy it for its original price, maybe I’d be interested to “Grab It Now” for the sale price. Brilliant!3) Last Chance to PurchaseJust like ModCloth lets you know when something on your wishlist is on sale, they have a remarketing campaign that alerts you when something on your wishlist is almost out of stock. Sometimes a sale can be enough to incite a customer to purchase; but maybe the urgency of an item selling out is enough for those items that are so popular you don’t even need to put them on sale!Emails like these are not only great because they encourage a purchase, but they also do so in a way that actually comes off as customer service. You’re doing your customers a favor in this email — getting in touch with them to let them know something they like won’t be available soon. Personal service, meet 2012 ecommerce — we think you two might have a lot in common.4) Repetitive BehaviorTarget people’s past buying behaviors to get in touch with them right at (or ideally, a little bit before) the moment they’ll need to make a purchase. This is a great email remarketing technique for businesses that deal with monthly, quarterly, or yearly purchases — like an online contact lens retailer, for example. Since they know when you last bought contacts, in what amount, and how long that amount will last, they can perfectly time an email remarketing campaign to hit at your time of need.But there are a few other creative applications for this type of remarketing campaign, too. Just take a look at how 1-800-Flowers targets holidays for which their products are a great fit in their 2012 Mother’s Day campaign. Even though I didn’t buy flowers from them at Mother’s Day last year (calm down, I used another vendor — I’m not an animal!), I’ve purchased with them for other holidays. So it’s smart of them to recognize Mother’s Day as an opportunity for me to buy flowers from them instead of another competitor, since they know I’m likely to buy flowers from them for other holidays.You can also do a mash-up of the two concepts we just discussed, like Pottery Barn did below. They took a more subjective look at customer buying behavior, and matched it up with the time of year to come up with this remarketing campaign. Since I purchased items from their outdoor collection last spring, I might be interested in doing so again this year. Share your creative ideas for email remarketing campaigns in the comments!Image credit: gordontarpley (Tip: If you do have an algorithm running, you can use your purchase confirmation email — an email that typically has a very high open rate — as an opportunity to include these recommendations.)6) All Your Friends Love It!We’ve already talked about the importance of social proof and user-generated content in your marketing; why not include it in your next email remarketing campaign? Send an email like ModCloth’s below (I told you they’d make multiple appearances today) that shows what others are saying about products you might like based on your past purchase history. These testimonials come from the product review section of their website, but you could also pull from customers’ tweets and Facebook status updates that praise your product — I’ve received an email from these folks that does just that in the past, too!7) Back in StockFinally, consider sending an email alert for the products your customers wanted, but couldn’t quite get their hands on, like you see below. There are two ways to approach this particular email remarketing campaign, both of which hinge on the fact that you keep out-of-stock products on your website.The first is to add a module to your website for products that are out of stock that lets customers put in their email address, and ask to be alerted when a product’s inventory is restocked. The other method, which can be combined with the previous one, is to alert customers who had an item on their wishlist but didn’t complete the purchase before an item sold out. In this instance, you know a customer loved an item, but just didn’t get to checkout in time; a remarketing campaign that let them know their much-coveted item is available would be another great way to deliver some seriously personal service! 5) Add-On and Related Item SuggestionsYou know when you go to Amazon.com and they have a whole list of items they think you might like based on the product page you’re viewing? Some of them are add-on items (products that would make the one you’re looking at function better); and some are related items (products that other shoppers who purchased an item tend to like).You might not have an algorithm running like Amazon does to tell you these things (or maybe you do!) but you can still take your product knowledge and apply it to an email remarketing campaign that recommends buyers purchase add-on and related items. Take a look at how Buy.com did it below.center_img Topics: Originally published Apr 27, 2012 1:27:00 PM, updated November 30 2018 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Which Format Is Right for Your Next Blog Post?

first_imgChoices are hard.And when it comes to choosing the right format for your next blog post, there’s quite the smorgasbord to choose from. Perhaps how-to posts are your forte. Or maybe you just can’t resist the list. But just because you have a signature format, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily right for the topic you’re blogging about.Aah … decisions, decisions. It’s okay though! We’re here to help you through it. So in this post, I’m going to break down some of the most popular blog post types and formats to help you determine which one is right for the blog idea you’ve got milling around in that head of yours.That said, keep in mind that some posts may even straddle two or more formats. I’ve written thought leadership posts that could also probably be classified as list posts. And if I’d added a SlideShare to them? They would’ve straddled three! The point is to recognize that there isn’t just one type of blog post you can create — and some formats are much more suitable for certain ideas than others. Another thing to consider is that a lot of times, it will all boil down to the angle you take on a topic. For example, if I wanted to write a post about social media, there is probably a different angle I could take that would work for each of the following formats. It will all depend on the angle I decide to take.Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post Templates13 Popular Blog Post Types & Formats to Choose From1) The How-To PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that tell your readers how to do something. This is one of the most common blog post formats for business bloggers. It makes perfect sense, considering how-to posts are inherently educational and great for generating traffic from organic search. Use how-to posts when your topic has to do with educating your audience about how to do something they might not know how to do.Oftentimes, how-to posts can also be strengthened by supporting visual components for concepts that lend themselves to visual explanations, like an instructional video (see third example below), or a visual aid (see second example below). For more information about how to write an awesome how-to post, check out the first example below (how meta, right?).Download a Free How-To Blog Post Template HereExamples:How to Write Stellar How-To Posts for Your Business BlogHow to Map Lead Nurturing Content to Each Stage in the Sales CycleHow to Create a Facebook Business Page in 5 Simple Steps [With Video!]2) The ListicleIn a Nutshell: Posts featuring content presented in a list format. Another very popular blog post format, the list post (commonly referred to as a “listicle”), is characterized by content organized in a list. List posts are easily recognizable by their titles, since they usually include a number in headline, and they’re great formats for beginner bloggers since they’re very formulaic. Unfortunately, it’s for this reason that listicles have gotten a bad rap, and are often perceived as low quality pieces of content … probably because there are indeed a lot of crappy list posts out there.But when done right, lists posts are great for posts that seek to aggregate tips, tactics, or ideas under a certain topic, and they can result in high-quality content. Plus, people love ’em! To learn about how to create a high-quality list post, check out this post. (Bonus: It also happens to be a great example of a list post in and of itself, in addition to the few below.)Download a Free Listicle Blog Post Template HereExamples:30 Terrible Pieces of Social Media Advice You Should Ignore12 Automated Workflows You’ll Kick Yourself for Not Using12 Things You Should Be Using Your Blog For (Besides Blogging)3) The Curated Post In a Nutshell: Posts that highlight and curate other content around a certain theme.Another post that has historically (yet undeservingly) gotten a bad rap is the curated post. Although it’s sometimes perceived as lazy and unoriginal, curated content can actually be extremely helpful to readers, since the research component of them can be very time consuming, and the end result is a compilation of helpful resources all in one place.The curated post is ideal for aggregating content such as industry examples, statistics, quotations, and videos — among other things. It’s also great for building relationships with the other bloggers and businesses you highlight within your curated content.Examples:15 Phenomenal TED Talks You Need to Watch Today10 Brands That Jumped on Instagram Video (And Rocked It)15 Examples of Brilliant Homepage Design4) The Thought Leadership Post In a Nutshell: Posts that make you think.One of the more difficult types of posts to write, thought leadership-style posts usually take the form of pontification about things like where the industry is headed or industry trends that seem to be emerging and what they mean.For this reason, they’re not really the type of post you can just decide to write at the drop of a hat, like, “I’m going to write a thought leadership post today!” Rather, they’re usually the result of thoughtful examination of things you’ve noticed or have been thinking about over time, and they tend to be speculative and sometimes controversial in nature. They also tend to spark some great discussions!Examples:What the Future Holds for Business BloggingHow Social Media Capitalism Will Affect Your Future Marketing StrategyWhat the Death of Google Reader REALLY Means5) The Fun PostIn a Nutshell: Fun posts that are meant to entertain you.Because who doesn’t love to laugh, smile, or be amazed? Content whose main purpose is to entertain does have a place in your content mix, and it can be very refreshing to your audience — as long as it’s in moderation.These types of posts are great for publishing during holidays, the end of the day, the end of the week, and other times when your audience is burnt out, winding down, or could use a break from some of the more, um, intellectual content on the web. Just make sure you stay true to the focus of your blog overall by ensuring the concept of your fun post has a relevant tie-in. For more on the benefits of entertaining content, here’s why you should publish content for entertainment value alone every once in a while.Examples:Random Thoughts From Marketers Like You13 Hilarious Examples of Truly Awful Stock Photography16 Marketing Pick-Up Lines to Snag Your Next Hot Date6) The ‘What’ PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that explain a concept.The ‘what’ post is perfect for introductory-style content geared toward a beginner audience. In general, the ‘what’ post serves to introduce and explain a concept, whether it be an industry trend, tactic, or tool; and it typically highlights what it is and why you should care. Linking to or including a call-to-action for more in-depth, intermediate content (like an ebook or another blog post) about the topic at the end of the post is a great best practice for ‘what’ posts.Download a Free “What Is” Blog Post Template HereExamples:What in the Heck Is Co-Marketing?What’s the Deal With This Whole ‘Context Marketing’ Thing?What Is a Landing Page and Why Should You Care?7) The ‘Why’ Post In a Nutshell: Posts that explain why.These posts are great when you’re trying to call attention to and emphasize the importance or significance of a certain topic, whether it be a trend, a tool, or a concept in general. Given their nature, these types of posts tend to be pretty introductory as well. In these posts, it’s smart to back up your why argument with supporting examples, facts, and statistics that will help convince the reader the topic is something they should care about. Think about it as something of a persuasive article.Examples:Why Purchasing Email Lists Is Always a Bad IdeaWhy You (Yes, You) Need to Create More Landing PagesWhy You Should Consider Inbound BEFORE Your Next Site Redesign8) The Feature StoryIn a Nutshell: Posts mimicking the style of a human interest story, detailing concepts and ideas of specific market interest.This type of post is great for topics, people, or trends that are worth more in-depth, detailed research and commentary. One of the more journalistic types of blog posts, these articles tend to be hard to define in a blanket statement and more of a “you’ll know it when you see it” kind of post.Examples: The Best Marketer in Silicon Valley Is Doing Everything You’re Not Supposed to DoI’m Not You, You’re Not Me. So Why Do We Have the Same Internet?Billion Dollar Babies: Are All These Little Companies Really Worth $1 Billion?9) The FAQ Post In a Nutshell: Posts that adopt a question and answer (Q&A) format.The FAQ post is another format that’s great for beginner bloggers, considering the Q&A format is a built in template. These posts are great for addressing common questions your audience has, grouped under a specific topic.A great way to generate posts like these is to ask your sales and services departments — the people who are talking to prospective and current customers all the time — to write down any common questions they hear. You can also collect questions you get from blog and social media commentary, as well as attendee questions during webinars. These questions are great fodder for Q&A type posts, and as a result, they can become great resources for your sales and services teams as well.Examples: Answers to Your Top 7 Questions About Mastering LinkedInAnswers to Your Top 7 Questions From the Science of Inbound MarketingAnswers to Your Top 9 Questions About Using LinkedIn Ads10) The Interview Post In a Nutshell: Posts that feature quoted perspectives of a third party.Similar to Q&A formatted posts — since these posts may also be formatted as Q&As — is the interview post. Fantastic for introducing the perspective of a third party on a particular topic, interview posts are also great for developing relationships with the industry experts or influencers you interview. They also open up the opportunity for greater reach, especially if the interviewee shares the resulting post with their networks.Examples:The Future of Inbound: Shel Israel Looks Ahead to ‘The Age of Context’Being Full of Sh*t Doesn’t Work AnymoreA Chat With a Marketer Who Has to Fight for His Budget11) The SlideShare PostIn a Nutshell: Posts that feature an embedded SlideShare presentation.Posts that are built around a specific SlideShare presentation do require a little bit more time investment and design savvy than the average text-based post, but the results are usually worth it. Content that lends itself well (but isn’t limited) to SlideShare presentations include the curation of visual examples, quotes, charts, quick takeaways, and general storytelling. SlideShare-focused posts also make great social media fodder, since visual content is so shareable and social friendly (Hint: LinkedIn also owns SlideShare ;-)Examples:7 Lessons From the World’s Most Captivating Presenters [SlideShare]15 Pearls of Wisdom From the Legendary David Ogilvy [SlideShare]S%*t PR People Do That Journalists Hate [SlideShare]12) The Infographic Post In a Nutshell: Posts that feature an infographic.Similar to the SlideShare post, the infographic post is also one that is high commitment and high reward. Infographics, when done well, are very sharable and likely to generate inbound links, but you do need some design chops to pull them off — or the money to outsource their creation to a designer. Infographics are great for compiling data and statistics in a visual way. They’re also great for organizing information in a timeline format, or presenting visual tips.Download a Free Infographic Blog Post Template HereExamples:What a Real Relationship in Social Media Should Look Like [INFOGRAPHIC]20 of the Most Memorable Marketing Moments in 2012 [INFOGRAPHIC]The History of Marketing: An Exhaustive Timeline [INFOGRAPHIC]13) The NewsjackIn a Nutshell: Timely posts that capitalize on something in the news.If you’re unfamiliar with the term, newsjacking refers to the practice of leveraging the popularity of a news story to support your sales and marketing goals. It requires the careful monitoring of news, and when done correctly, a newsjack post will relevantly tie the news to your industry in a timely fashion.To identify and capitalize on newsjacking opportunities, load up your RSS reader with a combination of popular news publications and popular industry publications — anywhere you could potentially discover news relevant to what your audience cares about. Never jacked the news before? Check out these four simple newsjack formulas to follow.Download a Free Newsjacking Blog Post Template HereExamples: Facebook Finally Rolls Out Graph Search to U.S. UsersTwitter Starts Highlighting Websites That Embed TweetsFacebook Launches Video on Instagram, Giving Twitter a Run for Its Money Originally published Jul 19, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated April 09 2019 How to Write a Blog Post Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Attract More Clicks to Your Blog Posts: 11 Revealing Title Tests

first_imgEvery marketer in their right mind knows that in order to drive more traffic to your blog, you need to come up with blog post titles that are actually enticing. But that’s easier said than done. If only we had some data to show us how to scientifically create blog post titles that will attract more clicks …Well luckily, I’m about to share with you that exact data. I recently wrote a post on how to use content discovery platforms to amplify your reach, in which I share tips on using these platforms to share your blog content on other relevant sites across the web. Having experimented with this over the past several months, I’ve been able to collect data on the clickthrough rates of different title variations for the same blog posts. (What a great way to do A/B testing on your blog post titles!)So, let’s dive into the insights from this data, and see how you can use it to construct your most clickable blog post titles yet.Which Blog Post Title Won?1) Question vs. No QuestionVariation A: What Does Google’s Hummingbird Update Mean For E-Commerce Business?Variation B: What the New Hummingbird SEO Algorithm Means for Your Ecommerce BusinessThe Winner: Variation A (.07% vs. .01% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Frame your blog post title as a question to make it more intriguing.2) Broader vs. More Specific TopicVariation A: A Fool-Proof Formula for Easily Creating Compelling ContentVariation B: A Fool-Proof Formula for Easily Writing Amazing Blog PostsThe Winner: Variation A (.09% vs. .07% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Use broader topic descriptions to position your blog post as relevant to a wider audience.3) Common vs. Unique AdjectivesVariation A: 8 Excellent Reasons to Redesign Your WebsiteVariation B: 8 Tell-Tale Signs Your Website May Need a RedesignThe Winner: Variation B (.05% vs. .04% CTR, trend)Takeaway: Use adjectives that aren’t used as frequently in other blog posts to make your title stand out more.4) “You”-focused vs. “Me”-focused LanguageVariation A: 10 Things Marketers Need to Know About Inbound Marketing in EuropeVariation B: 10 Inbound Marketing Techniques that Make Us Sit Up and Take Note The Winner: Variation A (.06% vs. .02% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Craft your title language to be about the reader and what is interesting to them, not you.5) Asking a Question vs. Offering Exclusive InfoVariation A: What’s Next for Content Marketing Trends in Europe?Variation B: Survey of Europe’s Content Marketers Reveals Surprising Trends for 2014 The Winner: Variation B (.18% vs. .10% CTR, trend)Takeaway: Hint at the chance to access new and/or exclusive information, using words like “surprising” and “reveal” to position your content as exciting and unique.6) Stating Your Offer at the Beginning vs. at the EndVariation A: 5 Infographics to Teach You How to Easily Create Infographics in PowerPoint Variation B: Easy Ways to Create Killer PowerPoint Infographics (Free Templates) The Winner: Variation A (.09% vs. .07% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: If your blog post is meant to highlight a specific piece of content, make it clear what that content is up front, rather than putting it toward the middle or end of your post title.7) Number vs. No NumberVariation A: The Simple Template for a Thorough Content Style GuideVariation B: 7 Steps to Creating a Thorough Style GuideThe Winner: Variation B (.02% vs. .00% CTR, trend)Takeaway: Begin your blog post title with a number to help make the post’s content more actionable and its length clear to the reader. This will also reassure your readers that they can scan through your list post quickly if needed.8) Common vs. Unique Descriptions of Your ContentVariation A: A Comprehensive Guide to Writing a Compelling Blog PostVariation B: A Fool-Proof Formula for Easily Creating Compelling ContentThe Winner: Variation B (.09% vs. .01% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Position your blog post as having a unique content format — there are “guides” and “checklists” all over the internet, but how many “fool-proof formulas” have you encountered?9) Fun vs. Serious ToneVariation A: 160 MORE Free Stock Photos You Seriously Need to Download NowVariation B: 75 Free Stock Photos for You to Use (and Tips for Customizing Them in PowerPoint)The Winner: Variation A (.11% vs. .05% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Don’t take yourself too seriously. Your post titles will be more enticing with a fun, light tone than a bland, serious one.10) Emphasizing Content vs. Value PropositionVariation A: 55 Free, Downloadable Templates for Visual Content CreationVariation B: 55 Free Templates to Make Visual Content Creation Quick & PainlessThe Winner: Variation A (.13% vs. .05% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: Sometimes including more words in your post title to enhance your value proposition can actually distract your readers from what it is you’re offering them. When in doubt, keep it simple.11) Clear vs. Vague TopicVariation A: Why Purchasing Email Lists Is Always a Bad IdeaVariation B: What’s the Quickest Way to Destroy Your Credibility as a Marketer? The Winner: Variation A (.03% vs. .01% CTR, statistically significant)Takeaway: While using a broad title can attract a larger audience, going too broad can have the opposite effect by being too vague and not piquing interest. Make it clear enough what your post is about that your readers know what they’re getting.I hope that seeing some of this data will not only inspire you to find unique ways to position your blog post titles to make them more clickable, but that it will also encourage you to try out different types of titles on your own blog to see what works best for your readers. Keep that creativity flowing!What types of blog post titles have worked well for you? Have you found any trends or patterns? Let me know in the comments! Originally published Apr 8, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack How to Write a Blog Post Topics:last_img read more

The Anatomy of a Highly Shareable Infographic

first_img Infographics Originally published May 12, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 The hard truth about creating content online is the amount of time you put into it isn’t always proportional to what you get out of it. We all hope that everything we do is a grand slam resulting in traffic, leads, and reporters clamoring to talk to you. But that’s not always what happens.And while you can brush that off when you didn’t invest too much time in the content, when it’s something more resource-intensive — like an infographic — it stings a bit more.Luckily, there are few things we can do to infographics to hedge our bets a bit. So, we put together the following infographic on making highly shareable infographics — helping you rake in more views and conversion opportunities. Follow these tips, and your infographic will be much more likely to get shared. Editor’s note: We’ve included a few Easter eggs in the infographic to make it extra shareable. See if you can find them!Save 编辑触摸共享全屏此交互式图像使用ThingLink创建。在thinglink.com上查看此图像。接触图片分享图像…全屏Save Didn’t find the Easter eggs? Hover your mouse over the infographic to see them pop up. (My favorite’s in the top left corner!) We’re using a platform called Thinglink to add relevant context to the information in the infographic — and make it easy for you all to share the post. If you’re looking to maximize your shareability, you might want to try it out for yourself. Do you create infographics? What other tips do you have for making them shareable? Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

A Simple Guide to Optimizing Your Landing Pages [Infographic]

first_img Landing Page Optimization Writing and designing a valuable offer is only the first step of getting leads out of that offer — next, you’ve got to set up landing pages so you can actually get those leads. That’s why it’s so critical to make sure your landing pages are properly optimized. Every tweak you make, big or small, could have a huge impact on the number of visitors that convert to leads.So how do you actually optimize your page? Which parts should you choose to change up to get the best results (the headline, the form, the copy itself, etc.)?Never fear: This infographic from the folks at QuickSprout sets out to answer these very questions. In it, you’ll learn the nine elements of high converting landing page design, how to maximize SEO and usability, and how to test effectiveness and calculate ROI.473Save Originally published Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated August 08 2017 473SaveWant to learn more about optimizing landing pages for lead generation? Check out our free ebook on landing page optimization.center_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more