Pre-Tech Precision Machining Hires New Human Resource Administrator

first_imgPre-Tech Precision Machining Hires New Human Resource AdministratorAugust 30, 2006 Williston, VT Pre-Tech Precision Machining, is pleased to announce the addition of Heather E. Streeter as Human Resource Administrator. Ms. Streeter was most recently the Branch Manager at Manpower in South Burlington and previously worked for the Department of Labor (formerly the Department of Employment & Training) as an Employer Resource Consultant. Ms. Streeter was also the Executive Director of the St. Albans Area Chamber of Commerce. She has served on numerous committees and boards and is a member of both the Franklin County and Burlington Business & Professional Women. In 2002, Ms. Streeter received the Presidents Alumni Leadership Award from Champlain College, Burlington, VT.Pre-Tech Precision Machining, an employee owned company, manufactures precision-machined metal and plastic components, serving the biomedical, computer and aerospace industries. Pre-Techs philosophy is straightforward and direct: We develop strong, two-way business relationships with our customers and we treat each customer as a partner. We seek to understand business needs, budgets, and schedules, and then we produce precisely manufactured components that meet and exceed their specifications. We manufacture quality parts on time and at a reasonable price. Our business philosophy has served us well since we opened our doors in 1985. Through those years, we have found that doing business with a customer should represent a partnership, a philosophy that has played a major role in building a solid business relationship with large and small companies alike. Our customers are loyal and we hold them to our highest regard.#30#last_img read more

Statement from Vermont Agriculture Secretary Allbee regarding nationwide egg recall

first_imgEnsuring a safe food supply is our top priority here at the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. Accordingly, we protect consumers by maintaining aggressive food safety programs on both the retail and farm levels.‘According to FDA reports, the eggs implicated in this nationwide recall were produced in Iowa. We trust those statements to be true, however to err on the side of caution, our staff of food safety inspectors remain on the lookout for recalled eggs at the retail level. To date, none of the recalled eggs have been found in Vermont, nor have any human cases of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) been reported to the Vermont Department of Health been linked to the recalled eggs.‘As a result of the pro-active work done on Vermont egg farms, coupled with food safety measures taken at the retail level, there have been no human cases of SE related to Vermont produced eggs reported. The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets is committed to this effort to ensure a safe and wholesome product.’Eggs, like meat, poultry, milk, and other foods, are safe when handled properly. Shell eggs are safest when stored in the refrigerator, individually and thoroughly cooked, and promptly consumed. Eggs should be kept refrigerated until they are used.Cooking reduces the number of bacteria present in an egg; however, an egg with a runny yolk still poses a greater risk than a completely cooked egg. Undercooked egg whites and yolks have been associated with outbreaks of SE infections. Both should be consumed promptly and not be kept warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.What are the specific actions I can take to reduce my risk of a SE infection?1. Keep eggs refrigerated.2. Discard cracked or dirty eggs.3. Wash hands, cooking utensils, and food preparation surfaces with soap and water after contact with raw eggs.4. Eggs should be cooked until both the white and the yolk are firm, to a temperature of at least 140 degrees, and eaten promptly after cooking.5. Do not keep eggs warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.6. Refrigerate unused or leftover egg-containing foods promptly.7. Avoid eating raw eggs, especially by young children, elderly persons, and persons with weakened immune systems or debilitating illness.For additional information contact: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/SalmonellaEggs/(link is external)Source: Vt DOAlast_img read more

Vermont foliage report: Early color tinges hillsides

first_imgThe stage is set for a beautiful foliage season as early fall color begins to emerge across Vermont’s higher elevations and low-lying areas.With the current forecast calling for cool nights through the weekend and the combination of adequate soil moisture and healthy green leaves, Vermont foresters are predicting an excellent fall season. In the early stages of fall foliage, the best color can generally be found in higher elevations, the northern sections of the state, and in low-lying areas where red maples are the early sentinels of the seasonal change.‘The cool nights that are in the forecast may pop a little more color our way by the end of the week,’ says Ginger Anderson, Chief of Forest Management for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. Early morning temperatures are forecasted to dip into the upper 30s this week.Forest health aerial surveys over the North East Kingdom revealed that color in the red maple is developing well, particularly in the wetlands, Anderson said.  In general, higher elevations will offer the most panoramic views of emerging color across the valleys, and many swamp or marsh areas will offer some of the most vivid and varied early season change. ‘I am also seeing scattered bits of other color, mostly weather and/or fungal related but overall leaf cover is good and I am anticipating a good color season in my little area,’ said Lamoille Country Forester  Raymond Toolan.To the south, Bennington Country Forester Chris Stone reports that ‘The beginnings for the foliage in Bennington County are now mostly found among the red maples that occupy the wetlands along Route 9 as you pass over the Green Mountains between Wilmington and Bennington, and to a lesser extent in the wetlands along Route 7 between Bennington and Manchester.’Best Bets:  Route 108 through Smugglers’ Notch between Stowe and Cambridge is showing early color, as is Routes 242 and 100 near Jay Peak, Routes 116 and 5A in the Lake Willoughby area.The higher elevations of the Worcester Range and Mount Elmore along Route 12 north of Montpelier are tinged with early color, as are views from Interstate 89 between Barre and Bolton.Note:  Road Conditions Updates ‘ Repairs in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene are proceeding as quickly as possible on the state’s key east-west roads.  Travel time may be delayed as roads open to traffic while construction is continuing in work zones. Travelers will encounter gravel surfaces and occasional one-way traffic on sections of these roads.  Detailed reports on the status of all affected roads and bridges are updated twice daily on:  www.aot.state.vt.us(link is external)The Vermont Hospitality Council advises making advance reservations, especially for weekends, because the most popular lodgings may fill early in late September and the first two weekends in October.  Some innkeepers may require a minimum two-night stay, especially on busy weekends.   Vermont tourism officials encourage visitors to take advantage of midweek specials during the foliage season as part of its statewide ‘Midweek Peek’ promotion.Also available on the website are several tools for planning a Vermont Fall Foliage tour: Fall Foliage ForecasterLodging Availability ForecasterScenic DrivesFall Travel Tips For more information, visit www.VermontVacation.com(link is external).last_img read more