Antiguan businessman is new CFU general secretary

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC):An Antiguan businessman, Neil Cochrane, is the new general secretary of the Caribbean Football Union (CFU), a CFU release said on Wednesday.Cochrane has been appointed to replace Anguilla’s Damien Hughes, who had announced his intention to leave the position since last year.The CFU statement announcing the appointment said Cochrane has a wealth of experience in management, having spent the last 13 years as a marketing manager.”We have to understand and have dialogue with the associations to understand their strengths and their weaknesses and to see how we can improve and enhance their weaknesses and further develop their strengths, so that when they have their leagues in St Lucia, or in Guadeloupe, or in Haiti they are all of a particular standard. We have to make sure they are all tapping into as many resources as possible to fund the various programmes that they have.”Relocation comingAlready, the new general secretary has announced plans to reduce the CFU staff in Jamaica as well as rent a smaller office there.He also revealed that some aspects of the daily operations of the CFU will be relocated to Antigua.”There will be some reduction in staff in Jamaica and the size in the current facility that we rent,” he said.”And then there will be the establishment of an office here in Antigua with some support staff and in particular the media. The PR machinery will be placed in Antigua.”In his first interview in the new role, Cochrane said while he intends to open-up dialogue with the membership, first on his agenda is transforming the CFU into a financially viable organisation.”The majority of the funding for the Caribbean Football Union comes through CONCACAF, and at the end of the day, the monies are not necessarily close to what the CFU requires to execute all of its programmes,” said Cochrane.”So, therefore, we have an obligation to do our endeavour best to increase and improve the revenue machinery of the Caribbean Football Union so that the member associations and can be supported stronger.”last_img read more

Technique key for hurdles success – Williams

first_imgPractice is the key ingredient for success, says women’s 100m hurdles World champion, Danielle Williams.Twenty-two-year-old Williams, the World University Games champion, surprised the world and herself when she beat the field to win the gold medal at the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships in Beijing, China, last month.Speaking to the IAAF’s Spike Magazine, Williams said practising her art helped improve her technique, which is key to staying focused under pressure.”Practice brings out consistency, and being consistent allows you to perform more reliably under pressure.”If you don’t have a reliable technique, things will fall down under pressure. The most important part of becoming a good sprint hurdler is to hurdle. I am lucky, in that I did hurdling from such a young age, and it did come easily to me; but the higher up you go, the more important it is to practise hurdling to make those important gains,” Williams said.The Jamaica national champion, who is conditioned by Johnson C. Smith University head coach and head coach of Jamaica’s team in Beijing, Lennox Graham, added that desire for one’s craft also plays a huge role in success.”If you don’t have that desire to do your sport, you will not be motivated to go out there and train hard. I am not only an athlete, but a genuine fan of the sport. My interest in athletics began when I used to watch my older sister, Shermaine, train on an evening. My desire really comes from being very competitive, and this desire has allowed me to train hard and do my best.”Williams’ sister, Shermaine, who won a silver medal in the event at the 2008 World Junior Championships in Bydgoszcz, Poland, finished seventh in Beijing.”I’ve worked hard on improving my technique, and I feel like these improvements have made a big difference,” Williams concluded.last_img read more

JC drub Clan Carthy

first_imgBilled as champions versus football minnows, title holders Jamaica College (JC) showed no mercy with Clan Carthy High, as they controlled, and bossed the game from start to finish, and strode to an easy 4-0 win in their ISSA/FLOW Manning Cup match, at the Jamaica College football field on Old Hope Road, yesterday.Leading forward Ronaldo Brown stepped up with a brace in the 24th and 86th minutes.Brown’s double puts him at three, so far, and he looks set to go past 20 for the season.Prior to that, Khori Edmond sent JC ahead in the 22nd minute. Captain Allando Brown proved his reliability and versatility as a centre back to head home their third goal in the 27th minute.”It is an amazing feeling to score two goals today,” Brown said, while noting that he idolises Junior Flemmings, who led JC’s scoring charge last season.”I idolise Flemmings, and coach has called on me to step up and get goals like he did for our school. We are a championship team, and I am trying to build my legacy without being under pressure of living up to his name,” (Flemmings’) Brown assured.The start of the game was delayed for close to an hour due to rain, but the home still went at their rivals from the first whistle.Coach Miguel Coley said: “We were happy that we could win the game with a clean sheet. The killer instinct is not there yet, but that’s something that we have to instil. When you get teams like this, you want as many goals as possible; 10 if possible,” he told The Gleaner.”Going forward, we are looking better and better, and that will be good for us,” he continued, adding “we have a good team, just that the killer instinct needs to be there.”Meanwhile, Clan Carthy coach Mallawe Blake said his players didn’t follow instructions.”We had chalkboard work at school and we knew that we couldn’t give JC too much space to play but the game just went away from us.”We just have to regroup and face St Catherine at home on Friday,” he assessed.YESTERDAY’S RESULTSGroup AJamaica College 4, Clan Carthy 0Calabar 4, Tivoli 0Group DHoly Trinity 1, Charlie Smith 2St Mary’s College 3, Penwood 1Group EWolmer’s 2, Bridgeport 0St Jago 8, Kingston High 1Group GKingston College 6 Campion 0Camperdown 2, JosÈ MartÌ 0TODAY’S GAMESPapine vs DunoonHydel vs CumberlandGreater Portmore vs Haile SelassieKingston Technical vs ElthamInnswood vs St George’s CollegeArdenne vs Denham TownAscot vs Spanish TownJonathan Grant vs ExcelsiorNorman Manley vs Vauxhalllast_img read more

Clarendon College on the hunt

first_imgWestern Bureau:Reigning daCosta Cup champions Clarendon College return to action this afternoon with a Group H game against Thompson Town High with three points on their minds.On 7 points, the Paul ‘Tegat’ Davis-coached Clarendon College will be hoping that top-of-the-table companions Lennon High either lose or get held to a draw in their game against Edwin Allen (6 pts).Clarendon has been enjoying some amount of rest having last played on September 19, and will be confident when facing a home team that is second from bottom in the group standings on 3 points.St Elizabeth Technical (STETHS) will have their toughest test of the campaign so far when they host Group E leaders Lacovia High at their Santa Cruz field.Lacovia on ten points, lead ahead of B.B. Coke also on ten points with STETHS, last year’s beaten finalists in third on 8 points, but their 6-0 victory over Newell on Thursday will provide a much needed confidence boost for the Omar Wedderburn-coached team.Wedderburn told The Gleaner that his team, although suffering a few setbacks, are still one of the teams to contend with and are still on course to topping the group.”It’s one game at a time for us, and although we have not been getting the kind of results we all desire, we are still in line to top the group,” said Wedderburn.Other Group E matches include Newell versus B.B. Coke, while Munro College take on Maggotty High in a crucial game.Spot Valley versus Muschett High could produce fireworks. The Group C leaders, on four and three points respectively are set to meet at the Muschett home field, while Herbert Morrison should get the better of a William Knibb side that is struggling for consistency.Third-place Herbert Morrison will take form in that match with William Knibb and the Falmouth-based school are on a single point after two matches and need a victory to kick-start their season.Today’s matchesGroup AIrwin vs Green PondGroup BGreen Island vs CambridgeRusea’s vs. Merlene OtteyGroup CHerbert Morrison vs William KnibbMuschett vs Spot ValleyGroup DMannings vs Godfrey StewartMaud McLeod vs Little LondonGroup ESTETHS vs LacoviaNewell vs B.B. CokeMunro vs MaggottyGroup FManchester vs Cross KeysDeCarteret vs BelairWinston Jones vs Mile GullyGroup GHolmwood vs SpaldingKnox vs AlstonBellefield vs ChristianaGroup HThompson Town vs Clarendon CollegeLennon vs Edwin AllenGroup ISteer Town vs Marcus GarveyCedric Titus vs Ocho RiosYork Castle vs Brown’s TownGroup JSt Mary Tech vs IslingtonBrimmervale vs TackyAnnotto Bay vs St Mary HighGroup KBog Walk vs CharlemontMcGrath vs EwartonTacius Golding vs DinthillGroup LPort Antonio vs TitchfieldBuff Bay vs Fair ProspectGroup MGlenmuir vs DenighPorus vs Garvey MaceoGroup NVere Tech vs Foga RoadKemps Hill vs CentralGroup OPaul Bogle vs Morant BayRobert Lightbourne vs St Thomas Techlast_img read more

Caymanas tips

first_imgBLUE DIXIE BIG AL BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANOBORDER LINE BORDER LINE EDISON EDISONROYAL GIRL #NATASHADONTPLAY NO MONEY FRIEND NATASHADONTPLAYBRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECT #MISS DOROTHY #BRAVE PROSPECT6. SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL TRADITIONAL STORM RISING POWER7. SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE8. STIR IT UP JASSUR STIR IT UP JASSUR9. #SHINE SHINE MARKOFAPRINCE MARKOFAPRINCE10. #SEEKING HOPE #CAMOUFLAGE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPE11. TRACKING THE STORM ETERNAL JOY ETERNAL JOY ETERNAL JOY#BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE #BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANO COUNTRY TRAIN ITALIANOBORDER LINE EDISON #BORDER LINE BORDER LINEXQUISITE CHOICE NO MONEY FRIEND TOUCH DE ROAD NATASHADONTPLAYDOC HOLIDAY DOC HOLIDAY # BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECTSIR LEYLAND HALL #SIR LEYLAND HALL TRADITIONAL STORM TRADITIONAL STORMSOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE BATTLE SONGYOGA YOGA STIR IT UP YOGASHINE MARKOFAPRINCE MARKOFAPRINCE SHINECAMOUFLAGE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM #TRACKING THE STORMBLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIECOUNTRY TRAIN ITALIANO COUNTRY TRAIN #ITALIANOEDISON BORDER LINE EDISON #EDISON#NATASHADONTPLAY XQUISITE CHOICE ROYAL GIRL ROYAL GIRLBRAVE PROSPECT #BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECTSIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALLSOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLEYOGA YOGA STIR IT UP YOGASHINE SHINE #MARKOFAPRINCE SHINE#SEEKING HOPE #SEEKING HOPE #SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM ETERNAL JOY#BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANOBORDER LINE EDISONROYAL GIRL GENUINE FRIENDLIGHT BRIGADE #BRAVE PROSPECTFLYING ACTION TRADITIONAL STORMSOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLESTIR IT UP STIR IT UP#SHINE SHINESEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORMlast_img read more

Tivoli drub Waterhouse, 4-0

first_img three-goal debut Tivoli Gardens continued their resurgence in the Red Stripe Premier League football competition, when they drubbed Waterhouse 4-0 at the Edward Seaga Sports Complex yesterday. The home side was led by a double strike by Miguel Ricketts in the 20th and 36 minutes. Veteran Jermaine ‘Teddy’ Johnson opened the scoring in the 15th minute, and substitute Rodico Wellington (74th) completed the rout. It was a game dominated by Tivoli, as Waterhouse’s back-line of Oshane Roberts, Nicholy Finlayson, Omar Walcott, Shamari Dyer, and goalkeeper Richard McCallum were no match for their opponents. Tivoli led 3-0 at the break, then cruised to a comfortable victory that lifted them to eight points from six games. Waterhouse dropped in the relegation zone, on four points. Ricketts, who transferred from York United in St Thomas during the summer, pushed his tally to three goals in his debut RSPL season. “I’m overwhelmed with the goals today and happy about the support from teammates,” Ricketts told The Gleaner. “We started the season slow, but we’re getting into the running now. We will continue training hard,” he reasoned. Coach of Tivoli Gardens Christopher Bender was happy with his team’s performance. “Miguel has come in quietly, in terms of personality and doing the work,” Bender said about his striker. “We always dominated the games previously, but in our last two we’ve won, so that speaks well for the team moving forward,” he added. Meanwhile, coach of Water-house Calvert Fitzgerald says it’s always a worry for the coach when the team is not winning consistently. “We played poorly and paid the price. We did not play with a lot of ambition today. We have to just go back and make some adjustments moving ahead,” Fitzgerald pointed out. When quizzed about his safety in the job, he responded: “In coaching, if you’re not getting the results, you can get sacked, and that is a part of the job.”last_img read more

JC passion burns – Coley

first_imgJC also face a must-win game against their Heroes Circle-based rivals in the Manning Cup next week, and Coley seems eager to face the challenges ahead, likening each game to a final.”We have a final against Wolmer’s, two finals back to back, it’s gonna be difficult, but in terms of how we play the football, we just have to take our chances,” Coley said ahead of today’s clash.”It’s gonna be interesting, we have played them two times since year, we have won one and lost one. we are the defending champions and we are gonna go out there and fight with that team spirit. That passion and that desire for Jamaica College will be very important. We have the passion and are playing good football, we just have to take our chances,” he assessed.JC come into today’s game fresh off a 3-0 win over Vauxhall. In this competition, however, they previously clipped Vere Technical 2-1 in their round of 16 game, then stopped fellow Manning Cup team Excelsior 2-0 in the quarter-finals last week.last_img read more

Bolt among World Athlete of the Year finalists

first_imgJamaican sprinting superstar Usain Bolt and the American pair of Ashton Eaton and Christian Taylor are the three men’s finalists for the 2015 IAAF World Athlete of the Year award. Bolt successfully defended his 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles at the IAAF World Championships in Beijing in August and clocked a world-leading time of 19.55 when winning the 200m. Meanwhile, Eaton won his second successive gold medal at the World Championships, setting a decathlon world record of 9045 points. Within his series, the US athlete set a world decathlon best of 45.00 for 400m. Taylor won the triple jump title in Beijing with a North American record of 18.21m, the second-best jump in history. The US jumper also won the Diamond Race title in his event. Last month the IAAF Family, which includes top athletes and agents, IAAF officials and selected media representatives from around the world, was asked to select nine men and nine women from each of the following categories: sprints, hurdles, middle and long distance, road running, race walking, jumps, throws, combined events and multi-terrain. The top-voted athletes in each category formed the long list, from which an international panel of 10 experts selected the three finalists.last_img read more

Preparing to reach the mountain top

first_imgWhen I was a boy, one of the things I used to hear but never listened to, was this: “The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.”In my childhood days, batsmen like Frank Worrell, Everton Weekes, and Clyde Walcott were my cricket heroes. To me, they were talented batsmen, pure and simple.Even later on, when my heroes became batsmen like Rohan Kanhai and Garry Sobers, it never dawned on me that they all had to work for hours to hone their skills.It was not until I became a man, when I witnessed the likes not only of Viv Richards, Clive Lloyd, and Brian Lara, but also that of Alvin Kallicharran, Larry Gomes, and Augustine Logie, that I understood the importance of hard work, training and practice to the fulfilment of one’s talent and the satisfaction of reaching the top.All those enthralling skills – the flowing runs, the elegant offside and on-side drives, the rapier-like cuts, the savage but thrilling hooks and pulls – that attracted thousands upon thousands of people to cricket grounds around the world, and the stamina to bat as if forever, like Shivnarine Chanderpaul, were the result of plenty sweat and aching, but well-drilled muscles, muscles that in the end reacted instinctively to anything and everything thrown at them on the cricket field.Training and practice, I realised then, make perfect.NOTHING LIKE TRAININGI also realised then, the more I read, the more I travelled, and the more I talked to some of the great players, that there was nothing like practice, and nothing like training.I learnt that in the general scheme of things, talent, what is usually called talent, is of less importance.What you put in is what you get out.Sport, success in sport, is one of the most published things about mankind. One of the least published things, however, is what makes a man a success.Look at any sport, look at the great practitioners, look at champions like Muhammad Ali, Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, and Usain Bolt, look at their habits, and they all have one thing in common practice and training, every day, and for hours, many hours each day.Sometimes, however, I wonder if this is the same for the present set of West Indies players, and for those from Jamaica, Barbados, Guyana, and Trinidad and Tobago and others who aspire to play for the West Indies.In fact, I stopped wondering years ago. I know now, based on what I have seen and based on what I have found out after asking questions, that most of them do not train or practise half as much as they should.The players with the basic ‘talent’ to play for the West Indies do not train and practise as hard and as often as they should, and the reason is either that that they cannot be bothered with the work, or they feel that they are good enough already and do not need to work.To them, training and practice mean going to the nets for a few minutes per day, stroking a few deliveries around, smashing a few deliveries out of the ground, and walking away after a few minutes. And most times, this is done in the presence of the coach, and it is done based on the demands of the team.The bowlers usually jog up to the wicket and wheel their arms over a few times, the fast bowlers included. No one ever trains to really get fit, or to really keep fit, and no one ever practises to improve his attacking play or his defensive play, his accuracy and control, and his fielding and his catching.Most times, even whenever they fail, even whenever the team fails, and whenever they lose in three days, it is the same reaction. Sometimes, most times whenever they lose early, it is no practice or training on the days scheduled as match days, according to some players.The West Indies ‘big guns’ usually do whatever they want to do, and whenever they want do it.A West Indies player lives off one or two or three successes for a long time. He plays as if a little success will last him forever.NO RIGHT TO SUCCEEDA West Indies player, or a territorial player, must know, and must be told, that no one has any God-given right to succeed; that although no one can succeed all the time, he must never succumb to complacency; that like the reporter, he is as good as last copy; and that every time he goes out to bat, or to bowl, or to field, he must challenge himself to be the best.The game, the fans, and his team expect nothing less. That’s his job, and that’s his road to success, to greatness.The West Indies fans must support the players despite the players’ poor performance, and the West Indies Board must do its best to support the players.One of the problems with the development of the players, however, is the coaching, or the lack of proper coaching, available.The West Indies have a lot of ‘coaches’ but most of them are not real coaches. They are, to call a spade a spade, nothing but organisers, admittedly, good organisers.They simply set the time to train and to practise, see that the props are in place, organise who to do what and when, position themselves at the bowler’s end, and direct traffic from there, sometimes telling the bowlers to keep the ball up or the batsmen to play in the ‘V’, and sometimes not to cut against the spin.There is no attempt to do anything else, to talk to the bowlers and to the batsmen, to correct mistakes, their technical mistakes, to show them what they may be doing wrong, and to try and prepare them for the next outing.No wonder West Indian players perform badly, making the same mistakes match after match, year after year.It seems as if the exercise of finding a coach is only to find something for the former players to do, and not to find the former players who are really interested in coaching or who can do a good job as coaches.Practice and training make perfect. Thank God for players like Easton McMorris, Sam Morgan, Desmond Lewis, and James Adams, and for one like Chanderpaul. They used to train and practise day after day, and till the cows come home.Maybe the West Indies and territorial players will change their attitude and their habits now that they are professionals, and now that the young West Indians in Bangladesh showed them how to play the game, how to win, and how, it is said, they should prepare themselves.Hopefully, they will behave like professionals, and that they will now train and practise, train and practise to reach the top.last_img read more

Jamaicans ready for Badminton test

first_imgMany-time national champion Gareth Henry will be expected to lead Jamaica’s charge for success against their international counterparts at next week’s Jamaica International Badminton Tournament. The stage has been set for some intense action inside the National Indoor Sports Centre from March 17-20 with competition in men’s and women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles, and mixed doubles categories. Jamaica’s 26- member contingent will be represented by a blend of youth and experience, headed by top male and female players Henry and Katherine Wynter, respectively. The 26-member team will have representation in all events. The country’s number one doubles pair of Gareth Henry and Garron Palmer will be looking to reign supreme, while the junior pair, Samuel Ricketts and Sean Wilson, will be a strong duo. Mixed doubles The Jamaicans will also see mixed doubles representation among the brother-and-sister pair of Gareth Henry and Geordine Henry as well as Garron Palmer and Mikaylia Haldane. Meanwhile, the women’s doubles is also expected to be fruitful for the Jamaicans, with leading pair Katherine Wynter and Ruth Williams tipped to go through to the finals. Next week’s tourney will reward successful competitors with Rio 2016 Olympics qualifying points and US$6,000 in prize money. Five top 100 ranked international players will also be in action. Twenty-one countries will participate: Jamaica, Austria, Italy, Mexico, Slovakia, Belgium, India, Barbados, Nigeria, Canada, Cuba, Chineese Taipei, Greece, Czech Republic, Peru, Portugal, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Lithuania, Australia, and Finland.last_img read more