Caymanas tips

first_imgBLUE DIXIE BIG AL BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANOBORDER LINE BORDER LINE EDISON EDISONROYAL GIRL #NATASHADONTPLAY NO MONEY FRIEND NATASHADONTPLAYBRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECT #MISS DOROTHY #BRAVE PROSPECT6. SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL TRADITIONAL STORM RISING POWER7. SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE8. STIR IT UP JASSUR STIR IT UP JASSUR9. #SHINE SHINE MARKOFAPRINCE MARKOFAPRINCE10. #SEEKING HOPE #CAMOUFLAGE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPE11. TRACKING THE STORM ETERNAL JOY ETERNAL JOY ETERNAL JOY#BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE #BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANO COUNTRY TRAIN ITALIANOBORDER LINE EDISON #BORDER LINE BORDER LINEXQUISITE CHOICE NO MONEY FRIEND TOUCH DE ROAD NATASHADONTPLAYDOC HOLIDAY DOC HOLIDAY # BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECTSIR LEYLAND HALL #SIR LEYLAND HALL TRADITIONAL STORM TRADITIONAL STORMSOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE BATTLE SONGYOGA YOGA STIR IT UP YOGASHINE MARKOFAPRINCE MARKOFAPRINCE SHINECAMOUFLAGE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM #TRACKING THE STORMBLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIECOUNTRY TRAIN ITALIANO COUNTRY TRAIN #ITALIANOEDISON BORDER LINE EDISON #EDISON#NATASHADONTPLAY XQUISITE CHOICE ROYAL GIRL ROYAL GIRLBRAVE PROSPECT #BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECT BRAVE PROSPECTSIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALL SIR LEYLAND HALLSOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLEYOGA YOGA STIR IT UP YOGASHINE SHINE #MARKOFAPRINCE SHINE#SEEKING HOPE #SEEKING HOPE #SEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORM ETERNAL JOY#BLUE DIXIE BLUE DIXIEITALIANO ITALIANOBORDER LINE EDISONROYAL GIRL GENUINE FRIENDLIGHT BRIGADE #BRAVE PROSPECTFLYING ACTION TRADITIONAL STORMSOUND OF MIRACLE #SOUND OF MIRACLESTIR IT UP STIR IT UP#SHINE SHINESEEKING HOPE SEEKING HOPETRACKING THE STORM TRACKING THE STORMlast_img read more

Tivoli drub Waterhouse, 4-0

first_img three-goal debut Tivoli Gardens continued their resurgence in the Red Stripe Premier League football competition, when they drubbed Waterhouse 4-0 at the Edward Seaga Sports Complex yesterday. The home side was led by a double strike by Miguel Ricketts in the 20th and 36 minutes. Veteran Jermaine ‘Teddy’ Johnson opened the scoring in the 15th minute, and substitute Rodico Wellington (74th) completed the rout. It was a game dominated by Tivoli, as Waterhouse’s back-line of Oshane Roberts, Nicholy Finlayson, Omar Walcott, Shamari Dyer, and goalkeeper Richard McCallum were no match for their opponents. Tivoli led 3-0 at the break, then cruised to a comfortable victory that lifted them to eight points from six games. Waterhouse dropped in the relegation zone, on four points. Ricketts, who transferred from York United in St Thomas during the summer, pushed his tally to three goals in his debut RSPL season. “I’m overwhelmed with the goals today and happy about the support from teammates,” Ricketts told The Gleaner. “We started the season slow, but we’re getting into the running now. We will continue training hard,” he reasoned. Coach of Tivoli Gardens Christopher Bender was happy with his team’s performance. “Miguel has come in quietly, in terms of personality and doing the work,” Bender said about his striker. “We always dominated the games previously, but in our last two we’ve won, so that speaks well for the team moving forward,” he added. Meanwhile, coach of Water-house Calvert Fitzgerald says it’s always a worry for the coach when the team is not winning consistently. “We played poorly and paid the price. We did not play with a lot of ambition today. We have to just go back and make some adjustments moving ahead,” Fitzgerald pointed out. When quizzed about his safety in the job, he responded: “In coaching, if you’re not getting the results, you can get sacked, and that is a part of the job.”last_img read more

JC passion burns – Coley

first_imgJC also face a must-win game against their Heroes Circle-based rivals in the Manning Cup next week, and Coley seems eager to face the challenges ahead, likening each game to a final.”We have a final against Wolmer’s, two finals back to back, it’s gonna be difficult, but in terms of how we play the football, we just have to take our chances,” Coley said ahead of today’s clash.”It’s gonna be interesting, we have played them two times since year, we have won one and lost one. we are the defending champions and we are gonna go out there and fight with that team spirit. That passion and that desire for Jamaica College will be very important. We have the passion and are playing good football, we just have to take our chances,” he assessed.JC come into today’s game fresh off a 3-0 win over Vauxhall. In this competition, however, they previously clipped Vere Technical 2-1 in their round of 16 game, then stopped fellow Manning Cup team Excelsior 2-0 in the quarter-finals last week.last_img read more

Bolt among World Athlete of the Year finalists

first_imgJamaican sprinting superstar Usain Bolt and the American pair of Ashton Eaton and Christian Taylor are the three men’s finalists for the 2015 IAAF World Athlete of the Year award. Bolt successfully defended his 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles at the IAAF World Championships in Beijing in August and clocked a world-leading time of 19.55 when winning the 200m. Meanwhile, Eaton won his second successive gold medal at the World Championships, setting a decathlon world record of 9045 points. Within his series, the US athlete set a world decathlon best of 45.00 for 400m. Taylor won the triple jump title in Beijing with a North American record of 18.21m, the second-best jump in history. The US jumper also won the Diamond Race title in his event. Last month the IAAF Family, which includes top athletes and agents, IAAF officials and selected media representatives from around the world, was asked to select nine men and nine women from each of the following categories: sprints, hurdles, middle and long distance, road running, race walking, jumps, throws, combined events and multi-terrain. The top-voted athletes in each category formed the long list, from which an international panel of 10 experts selected the three finalists.last_img read more

Preparing to reach the mountain top

first_imgWhen I was a boy, one of the things I used to hear but never listened to, was this: “The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.”In my childhood days, batsmen like Frank Worrell, Everton Weekes, and Clyde Walcott were my cricket heroes. To me, they were talented batsmen, pure and simple.Even later on, when my heroes became batsmen like Rohan Kanhai and Garry Sobers, it never dawned on me that they all had to work for hours to hone their skills.It was not until I became a man, when I witnessed the likes not only of Viv Richards, Clive Lloyd, and Brian Lara, but also that of Alvin Kallicharran, Larry Gomes, and Augustine Logie, that I understood the importance of hard work, training and practice to the fulfilment of one’s talent and the satisfaction of reaching the top.All those enthralling skills – the flowing runs, the elegant offside and on-side drives, the rapier-like cuts, the savage but thrilling hooks and pulls – that attracted thousands upon thousands of people to cricket grounds around the world, and the stamina to bat as if forever, like Shivnarine Chanderpaul, were the result of plenty sweat and aching, but well-drilled muscles, muscles that in the end reacted instinctively to anything and everything thrown at them on the cricket field.Training and practice, I realised then, make perfect.NOTHING LIKE TRAININGI also realised then, the more I read, the more I travelled, and the more I talked to some of the great players, that there was nothing like practice, and nothing like training.I learnt that in the general scheme of things, talent, what is usually called talent, is of less importance.What you put in is what you get out.Sport, success in sport, is one of the most published things about mankind. One of the least published things, however, is what makes a man a success.Look at any sport, look at the great practitioners, look at champions like Muhammad Ali, Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, and Usain Bolt, look at their habits, and they all have one thing in common practice and training, every day, and for hours, many hours each day.Sometimes, however, I wonder if this is the same for the present set of West Indies players, and for those from Jamaica, Barbados, Guyana, and Trinidad and Tobago and others who aspire to play for the West Indies.In fact, I stopped wondering years ago. I know now, based on what I have seen and based on what I have found out after asking questions, that most of them do not train or practise half as much as they should.The players with the basic ‘talent’ to play for the West Indies do not train and practise as hard and as often as they should, and the reason is either that that they cannot be bothered with the work, or they feel that they are good enough already and do not need to work.To them, training and practice mean going to the nets for a few minutes per day, stroking a few deliveries around, smashing a few deliveries out of the ground, and walking away after a few minutes. And most times, this is done in the presence of the coach, and it is done based on the demands of the team.The bowlers usually jog up to the wicket and wheel their arms over a few times, the fast bowlers included. No one ever trains to really get fit, or to really keep fit, and no one ever practises to improve his attacking play or his defensive play, his accuracy and control, and his fielding and his catching.Most times, even whenever they fail, even whenever the team fails, and whenever they lose in three days, it is the same reaction. Sometimes, most times whenever they lose early, it is no practice or training on the days scheduled as match days, according to some players.The West Indies ‘big guns’ usually do whatever they want to do, and whenever they want do it.A West Indies player lives off one or two or three successes for a long time. He plays as if a little success will last him forever.NO RIGHT TO SUCCEEDA West Indies player, or a territorial player, must know, and must be told, that no one has any God-given right to succeed; that although no one can succeed all the time, he must never succumb to complacency; that like the reporter, he is as good as last copy; and that every time he goes out to bat, or to bowl, or to field, he must challenge himself to be the best.The game, the fans, and his team expect nothing less. That’s his job, and that’s his road to success, to greatness.The West Indies fans must support the players despite the players’ poor performance, and the West Indies Board must do its best to support the players.One of the problems with the development of the players, however, is the coaching, or the lack of proper coaching, available.The West Indies have a lot of ‘coaches’ but most of them are not real coaches. They are, to call a spade a spade, nothing but organisers, admittedly, good organisers.They simply set the time to train and to practise, see that the props are in place, organise who to do what and when, position themselves at the bowler’s end, and direct traffic from there, sometimes telling the bowlers to keep the ball up or the batsmen to play in the ‘V’, and sometimes not to cut against the spin.There is no attempt to do anything else, to talk to the bowlers and to the batsmen, to correct mistakes, their technical mistakes, to show them what they may be doing wrong, and to try and prepare them for the next outing.No wonder West Indian players perform badly, making the same mistakes match after match, year after year.It seems as if the exercise of finding a coach is only to find something for the former players to do, and not to find the former players who are really interested in coaching or who can do a good job as coaches.Practice and training make perfect. Thank God for players like Easton McMorris, Sam Morgan, Desmond Lewis, and James Adams, and for one like Chanderpaul. They used to train and practise day after day, and till the cows come home.Maybe the West Indies and territorial players will change their attitude and their habits now that they are professionals, and now that the young West Indians in Bangladesh showed them how to play the game, how to win, and how, it is said, they should prepare themselves.Hopefully, they will behave like professionals, and that they will now train and practise, train and practise to reach the top.last_img read more

Jamaicans ready for Badminton test

first_imgMany-time national champion Gareth Henry will be expected to lead Jamaica’s charge for success against their international counterparts at next week’s Jamaica International Badminton Tournament. The stage has been set for some intense action inside the National Indoor Sports Centre from March 17-20 with competition in men’s and women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles, and mixed doubles categories. Jamaica’s 26- member contingent will be represented by a blend of youth and experience, headed by top male and female players Henry and Katherine Wynter, respectively. The 26-member team will have representation in all events. The country’s number one doubles pair of Gareth Henry and Garron Palmer will be looking to reign supreme, while the junior pair, Samuel Ricketts and Sean Wilson, will be a strong duo. Mixed doubles The Jamaicans will also see mixed doubles representation among the brother-and-sister pair of Gareth Henry and Geordine Henry as well as Garron Palmer and Mikaylia Haldane. Meanwhile, the women’s doubles is also expected to be fruitful for the Jamaicans, with leading pair Katherine Wynter and Ruth Williams tipped to go through to the finals. Next week’s tourney will reward successful competitors with Rio 2016 Olympics qualifying points and US$6,000 in prize money. Five top 100 ranked international players will also be in action. Twenty-one countries will participate: Jamaica, Austria, Italy, Mexico, Slovakia, Belgium, India, Barbados, Nigeria, Canada, Cuba, Chineese Taipei, Greece, Czech Republic, Peru, Portugal, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Lithuania, Australia, and Finland.last_img read more

Powell eager for javelin attention

first_imgJamaica’s reigning men’s national javelin record holder Orrin Powell wants the country to take notice of his talent as he seeks to become one of few Caribbean men to represent their country successfully in the event.The 24-year-old final-year student at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport improved the national record to 75m earlier this season.Powell has been working with coach Marlon Gayle, who is also a lecturer at the Spanish Town-based institution since 2012.Gayle told The Gleaner that his charge wants eight metres to make the Olympic-qualifying mark, and he is confident Powell will be able to make the standard.The athlete, however, feels that he has a lot more to learn on a technical level and hopes to use each stage as a building block to throw even further.”Javelin is not really a Jamaican sport and something they prepare the youngsters for from a tender age, but since 2009, I started throwing.”I didn’t compete at Champs. I used to throw shot put, discus, and so on, and do long jump, ’cause I was well-rounded, but I wasn’t a name at Champs,” Powell told The Gleaner.”I actually started throwing Javelin at G.C. Foster College in 2012, and I have made some significant improvements. In one year, I moved from 51m to 70.3m,” he said.HARD WORK, DEDICATIONPowell said with hard work and dedication he moved from 70 to 75 metres, adding: “I am hoping to be the second Caribbean athlete to throw over 80 metres like Keshorn Walcott (Trinidad and Tobago).”Walcott is the London 2012 Olympic gold medallist in the event.According to Powell, there has been next to little feedback since breaking the national record.”No one has approached me in terms of making certain steps forward or to say that’s good,” he reasoned.The athlete, while keeping an eye on the qualifying standard for the Olympic Games in Brazil this Summer, says his main focus is ensuring that he will be readyin time for next year’s World Championships in London.last_img read more

Foster’s Fairplay | Coaches deserve better

first_imgThe Rio Olympics athletes celebration and awards package was announced by Minister of Culture, Gender Affairs, Entertainment and Sports Olivia Grange last week. It was rolled out as a three-day event, most appropriately slotted into the National Heroes weekend and would have its climax in western Jamaica, of which the Jamaica National 5K Run/Walk was a constituent. The first affair – a reception for the athletes – hosted by the prime minister, happened on the lawns of Jamaica House last Friday. Then the actual presentation of tributes and prize monies took place at the Rio Sports Gala on Saturday at the National Indoor Sports Centre. The culmination of the celebratory activities took place at the Melia Braco Village in Trelawny. One is not sure how coincidental this is, as the athletes function mirrors the prestige of the Merritone Reunion weekend’s 26th anniversary, taking place simultaneously at the resort venue, formerly known as the Grand Lido. Also announced at the press conference was the Government’s intention to recognise and pay homage to four of the country’s most outstanding athletes in recent times by commissioning statues in their honour. Those named for this lifetime tribute were Veronica Campbell-Brown, Asafa Powell, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and the worldwide acknowledged legend in his time, Usain Bolt. There was an outcry from certain quarters that triple world record-holder Powell was not deserving of this accolade. Looking at his lack of success by not having a single gold medal at global events after a multiplicity of making final rounds, the youngest of a family of sprinters was even called a failure. Another situation coming out of the minister’s address was the cash incentives afforded all participants in the Rio spectrum, which included the often disrespected Paralympians. The range of amounts presented was from US$10,000 for individual gold medallists through to US$2,500 each to those who merely made the team, but not a final, to the lowest on the cash rung, an amount of US$1000 to coaches and officials. Foster’s Fairplay will not dignify the suggestion that Powell should not have a lasting monument to his performances by dwelling on it. Not to so reward him should be considered the closest thing to track and field vulgarity, if such a distasteful word can be borrowed from other less-than-decent exploits. To even contemplate omitting the man whose pioneering role in the nation’s sprinting prowess is so significant and seminal in charting the way to 9:58 (Bolt’s current world record) is in stark conflict with sanity. Where this column has a real issue with the minister is the bottom-of-the-ladder allotment to the coaches – a meagre US$1,000. It is indicative of a perception that those professionals do not really matter. Officials, for the most part, if not all, have their nine-to-five. They do not – and there is opening for dissent here – seek to remunerate themselves for the time they take off to represent their country. Coaches are different. This is what they do, at home or on overseas assignments. Untold and unrewarded are the sacrifices they make to hone that primary-school-recruited talent and nurture and escort it to national focus and attention, that can lead to the professional level. At that stage, that unfortunate coach and the important developmental role played are sometimes forgotten, as the new players and the now well-tuned athlete reaps all the benefits. Thankfully, the hitherto sidelined coaches are now ‘smelling the roses’. They share the high-school training facilities with adult coaching sessions as they seek to have a slice of the bigger cake. In all this, Foster’s Fairplay is not speaking to the Rio contingent of coaches, a portion of whom have already seen the light and have stepped up a notch. The argument is an overall assessment of the thinking from above, that it is an arena where athletes alone rule supreme and those who prepare them to get the ultimate recognition are of little or no moment. Perish that thought. Coaches deserve and must get greater respect. A paltry US$1,000 cannot cut it. Feedback: Email lauriefoster2012@gmail.com REAL ISSUElast_img read more

Brathwaite in top 20 after third Test heroics

first_imgDUBAI, UAE (CMC):Opener Kraigg Brathwaite’s monumental performance in the third Test against Pakistan has seen him vault into the top 20 of the International Cricket Council Test player rankings.The 23-year-old right-hander jumped 13 places to a career-best 19th spot in the latest batting rankings released yesterday to be the only West Indies batsman in the top 20.Brathwaite became the first opener to remain undefeated in both innings in a Test with 142 and 60, respectively, as West Indies beat Pakistan by five wickets in Sharjah for their only victory of the limited overs and Test series.The Windies vice-captain was joined by wicketkeeper-batsman Shane Dowrich, who moved up 27 spots to a career-best 58th, following his outstanding performance in both inningsDowrich made 47 in the first innings and an unbeaten 60 in the second, and it was his aggressive batting as part of an 87-run, unbroken sixth-wicket partnership that saw West Indies complete a successful run chase early on the final day.Roston Chase, who scored a half-century in the first innings, has risen four places to 82nd in the rankings.Australian Steve Smith, meanwhile, remains on top of the batting rankings, with South African Hashim Amla and New Zealander Kane Williamson moving up one place each to second and third, respectively.In the bowling rankings, leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo has also enjoyed a measure of success, jumping seven places to a career-best 29th spot after taking seven wickets in the third Test.His captain, Jason Holder, also tasted upward movement, leaping 12 spots to 47th following his maiden five-wicket haul in the second innings in Sharjah.The top three in the rankings remain unchanged, with off-spinner Ravi Ashwin topping the pile, with South African Dale Steyn second and Englishman James Anderson third.last_img read more

Tony Becca | Finally, a woman close to the top

first_imgFor some time now, cricket has been a man’s game, and it has been so since at least the start of the Test game 140 years ago.Although women have been involved as supporters of the game for such a long time, their involvement was confined to ‘bowling’, under-arm style, to their younger brothers in the backyard or as members of the tea brigade,When it came to women’s participation and administration, however, the game was considered foreign to their nature and, therefore, out of bounds to them.Gradually, however, women around the world, in places like England and Australia, but excepting one like Pakistan, began to play the game, and like most things, it spread like wild fire until it got to other places such as India and South Africa.In Jamaica and the West Indies, however, it took its own sweet time, and it was not until around the 1970s that women took to the field.Before then, Ms Vera Wright became a member and committee member of Lucas Cricket Club, Lucas became popular for their tea-time refreshments, and Ms Wright became known as ‘Auntie V’ to Lucas members and their friends.She set the pace for others to follow, and those who followed included Margaret Cooke – honorary secretary at Lucas, Dorothy Hobson – committee member and now manager at Melbourne, Monica Hosue (Williams) – committee member at Melbourne, Carol Bryan – honorary secretary at Melbourne, Caroline Kelly – committee member at Melbourne, and Pat Gillings – committee member at Melbourne.Others who followed included Novelette Rickets – committee member of Manchester Cricket Association and the first woman member of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA), Pauline Anderson-White – honorary secretary of the Trelawny Cricket Association, Rose Bryan – committee member of the St Mary Cricket Association, and Diann Campbell – committee member of Melbourne and the first woman honorary secretary of the JCA.Also in action are women like Amanda Baker – committee member of the St Elizabeth Cricket Association, Pollyana Mitchell -honorary secretary of Lucas, and Sonji Watson – committee member of Kensington Cricket Club.PLAYERS IMPORTANTAs dedicated as these women may be, however, players are the most important part in the development of the game, and the 1970s also saw the start of the drive in the real growth of women’s cricket in Jamaica.Led by Monica Taylor and Sally Kennedy, women’s cricket took off almost from the word, ‘go’, with teams like Kensington, Lucas, Diamonds, and Waterwell, followed by Melbourne playing competitively and fairly regularly and putting out players like Rhona McLean, Kay Osbourne, and Joyce Miller, to Vivalyn Latty-Scott, Jean Cadogan, Yolande Geddes, Peggy Fairweather, Hobson, and Grace Williams-Alston, down to others like Marlene Needham, Jennifer Sterling, and Jacqueline Robinson.Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago, in fact, ventured out into international play before the West Indies.Those, however, were lovely days, days of regular and exciting competition among Jamaica, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and St Lucia, bringing together players like Louise Browne, Ann Browne, and Stacey Ann King from around the region, and those were the days when the West Indies hosted England and Australia, toured England and India, and, in the process, defeated one or two along the way.In terms of participation and competition, women’s cricket, especially in Jamaica, fell away for a while, but it has recently hinted of a comeback, and with Jamaicans like Stafanie Taylor, Shanel Daley, and Chedean Nation, and with West Indians such as Deandra Dottin, Anisa Mohammed, Marisa Aguilera, Hayley Matthews, Britney Cooper, Shermaine Campbell, and Shaquana Quintyne, the future seems bright and rosy.On the field, there is also Jacqueline Williams, a good female umpire who had the distinction of standing in the regional men’s four-day competition at Sabina Park recently and, by her presence, her deportment, and her skill, she has set a pace for others of her gender to follow.PROMISING HISTORYWest Indies women are the T20 champions of the world, and once they step up the participation and the competition all around the region, especially after such a promising history, nothing, it seems, can stop them in the future, and particularly now that West Indies Cricket has appointed a woman as its chief operating officer.Verlyn Faustin, the company’s secretary, is now also the chief operating officer (COO) responsible for the day-to-day operations, and mainly for control, administrative, and reporting procedures aimed at effective management on and off the field.All who love West Indies cricket applaud Faustin’s elevation and wish her well in this her added responsibility, especially as from all reports, she is more than capable.Her rise to close to the top is a good move for cricket and for women’s cricket in particular. It has given them a voice at the top where it matters most, and on top of that, she has joined other women around the world of cricket, including Ingrid Cronin-Knight and Liz Dawson, who are members of the nine-member New Zealand Cricket board, and Debbie Hockley, who is president of the board and one who call the shots for all New Zealand’s cricket.With Jimmy Adams as the new director of cricket, with Jason Holder as the captain of the men’s team, with Taylor as the captain of the women’s team, and with Faustin as the COO, West Indies cricket, men and women, is in good hands, or so it seems.last_img read more