UGArden’s Herb Garden

first_imgOn a cool, foggy morning in February, students and volunteers work together to tend the UGArden medicinal herb garden. While it’s grown over the last seven years, the garden is just a few rows of a field at the edge of the University of Georgia’s student-run farm, UGArden. But it’s become an integral part of UGArden and a refuge for students who want to learn more about the benefits of medicinal plants and escape from the stresses of class and work.The garden is run by herbalist Noelle Fuller, who received her bachelor’s degree in nutrition science and her master’s degree in horticulture, both from UGA.The garden serves as a growing and harvesting location for many herbal remedies and teas that are sold on the property and at the UGA Tate Student Center marketplace. Proceeds go back to UGArden, which is meant to be a teaching tool and a retreat from the stress of school for students.In December, UGArden launched a line of herbal teas ranging from Immuni-Tea, which supports the immune system, to Nourished Heart Tea, with calming and soothing properties. Besides tea, UGArden students and volunteers use the garden’s herbs to produce herbal salve, lavender oil and lavender herbal soap.As a graduate student, Fuller joined her love of nutrition and horticulture by studying holy basil, an herb known to have stress-reducing properties.Fuller’s scientific approach to herbalism gives her insights that she’s eager to share with her interns and volunteers, many of whom are learning about herbs for the first time.“Really why we’re here is for education and empowerment,” Fuller said.While sales help to support the garden’s expenses, the volunteers who tend to the garden every week really keep it going.Each week, Fuller and four herb garden interns work in the garden from 8-11 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Zoe Sabatini, a 20-year-old undergraduate psychology student, joined UGArden as a volunteer and found out about the herb garden internship, which piqued her interest.“It’s so nice to have time during the day,” Sabatini said. “Even though you’re doing work, it’s so calming and freeing.”This time of year, Fuller and her interns propagate new plants by cutting pieces from existing plants in the ground and putting them in water to create new plants.They’ll sell the baby plants at the herb garden’s spring plant sale this spring, where the public can learn more about medicinal gardening and purchase some of their own medicinal plants.Fuller’s team also makes videos of the work they do in the garden to post to their YouTube channel in an attempt to keep the public engaged and involved in their program.Ultimately, she sees her job as empowering people — her interns and others — to take care of themselves by incorporating medicinal herbs into their lives.“It’s great to have hands-on education, so to me, that’s why I’m here and that’s why I love what I do,” Fuller said.For more information about the program and sales of the garden’s products, visit ugarden.uga.edu/medicinal-teas/. Follow UGArden on Facebook to stay updated about events, like the medicinal garden’s spring plant sale. Follow Noelle on YouTube at www.youtube.com/channel/UC0rufIE89uMT6r_2fyjIKMQ to see her videos of working in the herb garden.To learn more about herbs and how to cultivate them, UGArden offers workshops where you can get hands-on experience. Visit squareup.com/store/ugarden to learn more.last_img read more

Food Showcase

first_imgMore than 100 Georgia 4-H’ers from across the state participated in the Georgia 4-H Food Showcase on Nov. 9 at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga.The showcase, part of the Georgia 4-H Healthy Living Program, is a competition that focuses on the basics of healthy living, nutrition, food safety and preparation. Each contest provides a creative and specific list of objectives that develop leadership skills, proficient and efficient communication, nutritional knowledge for meal planning, food preparation skills and the opportunity for 4-H’ers to compete in an exciting and relevant event.“The Georgia 4-H Food Showcase is an opportunity for youth to display the skills that they have spent a long time practicing,” said Courtney Brown, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist assigned to 4-H and youth programs. “The food preparation and presentation skills that the youth develop as they prepare for Food Showcase enhance their home-cooking experience and nutrition knowledge which may also help them move towards a career in family and consumer science, nutrition or culinary arts.”The Georgia 4-H Food Showcase includes four contests. The Food Challenge contest includes both Junior (sixth-eighth grade) and Senior (ninth-12th grade) team competitions. This portion of the contest challenges 4-H’ers to create a dish using only a predetermined set of ingredients and winners are judged on preparation and presentation.Chicken Barbecue and Turkey Barbecue contests are individual Senior events.  The Egg Preparation Demonstration contest is an individual event for Juniors and Seniors. Combined skills in an oral presentation, cooking and sensory evaluation structures how the winners are placed in the Chicken and Turkey Barbecue contests. Egg Preparation challenges participants to factor appearance, subject matter and creativity when presenting an egg-based disThe senior state winner from each contest will receive Georgia Master 4-H’er status and be honored at Georgia State 4-H Congress in July in Atlanta, Ga.This year’s winners of the 2019 Georgia 4-H Food Showcase are:Food Challenge:Senior First Place Team: Dianah Anderson, Tandria Burke and Christiana Smith – Dougherty CountySenior Second Place Team: Israel Farrow, Laura Harriss and Quadriyah Williams – Cobb CountySenior Third Place Team: Alyssa Goldman, Kaylie Goldman, Tiger Rupers and Parker Varnadoe – Madison CountyJunior First Place Team: Savannah Keller, Alvaro Mena, Jackson Sims and Shaniya Smith – Chatham CountyJunior Second Place Team: Chloe Boatright, Susan Carter and Rachel Hughes – Appling CountyJunior Third Place Team: Spencer Lawrence, Aliya McCoy, Tisey Powell and Faith Ann Rogers – Emanuel CountyChicken Barbecue:First Place: Kaylee Collins – Spalding CountySecond Place: Isabella Elwood – Morgan CountyThird Place: Jonathan Woolf – Liberty CountyTurkey Barbecue:First Place: Gabriel Whitlock – Spalding CountySecond Place: Jaden Randall – Bryan CountyThird Place: Evelyn Day – Houston CountyEgg Preparation:Senior First Place: Amare Woods – Tift CountySenior Second Place: Lily Thomas – Putnam CountySenior Third Place: Veronica Lee – Bleckley CountyJunior First Place: Leala Hutchens – Bleckley CountyJunior Second Place: Clair Knapp – Spalding CountyJunior Third Place: Maggie Powell – Bleckley CountyThe 2019 Georgia 4-H Food Showcase is made possible by the following generous sponsors: Food Challenge: Georgia Grown and Rhea Bentley; Chicken Barbecue: Mr. and Mrs. Ken Jones, Sam Massey and Abit Massey; Turkey Barbecue: Mr. and Mrs. Ed Graham; Egg Preparation: Georgia 4-H Clover Café.Georgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 175,000 people annually through the UGA Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org or contact your UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

Pre-Tech Precision Machining Hires New Human Resource Administrator

first_imgPre-Tech Precision Machining Hires New Human Resource AdministratorAugust 30, 2006 Williston, VT Pre-Tech Precision Machining, is pleased to announce the addition of Heather E. Streeter as Human Resource Administrator. Ms. Streeter was most recently the Branch Manager at Manpower in South Burlington and previously worked for the Department of Labor (formerly the Department of Employment & Training) as an Employer Resource Consultant. Ms. Streeter was also the Executive Director of the St. Albans Area Chamber of Commerce. She has served on numerous committees and boards and is a member of both the Franklin County and Burlington Business & Professional Women. In 2002, Ms. Streeter received the Presidents Alumni Leadership Award from Champlain College, Burlington, VT.Pre-Tech Precision Machining, an employee owned company, manufactures precision-machined metal and plastic components, serving the biomedical, computer and aerospace industries. Pre-Techs philosophy is straightforward and direct: We develop strong, two-way business relationships with our customers and we treat each customer as a partner. We seek to understand business needs, budgets, and schedules, and then we produce precisely manufactured components that meet and exceed their specifications. We manufacture quality parts on time and at a reasonable price. Our business philosophy has served us well since we opened our doors in 1985. Through those years, we have found that doing business with a customer should represent a partnership, a philosophy that has played a major role in building a solid business relationship with large and small companies alike. Our customers are loyal and we hold them to our highest regard.#30#last_img read more

Statement from Vermont Agriculture Secretary Allbee regarding nationwide egg recall

first_imgEnsuring a safe food supply is our top priority here at the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. Accordingly, we protect consumers by maintaining aggressive food safety programs on both the retail and farm levels.‘According to FDA reports, the eggs implicated in this nationwide recall were produced in Iowa. We trust those statements to be true, however to err on the side of caution, our staff of food safety inspectors remain on the lookout for recalled eggs at the retail level. To date, none of the recalled eggs have been found in Vermont, nor have any human cases of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) been reported to the Vermont Department of Health been linked to the recalled eggs.‘As a result of the pro-active work done on Vermont egg farms, coupled with food safety measures taken at the retail level, there have been no human cases of SE related to Vermont produced eggs reported. The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets is committed to this effort to ensure a safe and wholesome product.’Eggs, like meat, poultry, milk, and other foods, are safe when handled properly. Shell eggs are safest when stored in the refrigerator, individually and thoroughly cooked, and promptly consumed. Eggs should be kept refrigerated until they are used.Cooking reduces the number of bacteria present in an egg; however, an egg with a runny yolk still poses a greater risk than a completely cooked egg. Undercooked egg whites and yolks have been associated with outbreaks of SE infections. Both should be consumed promptly and not be kept warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.What are the specific actions I can take to reduce my risk of a SE infection?1. Keep eggs refrigerated.2. Discard cracked or dirty eggs.3. Wash hands, cooking utensils, and food preparation surfaces with soap and water after contact with raw eggs.4. Eggs should be cooked until both the white and the yolk are firm, to a temperature of at least 140 degrees, and eaten promptly after cooking.5. Do not keep eggs warm or at room temperature for more than 2 hours.6. Refrigerate unused or leftover egg-containing foods promptly.7. Avoid eating raw eggs, especially by young children, elderly persons, and persons with weakened immune systems or debilitating illness.For additional information contact: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/SalmonellaEggs/(link is external)Source: Vt DOAlast_img read more

Vermont foliage report: Early color tinges hillsides

first_imgThe stage is set for a beautiful foliage season as early fall color begins to emerge across Vermont’s higher elevations and low-lying areas.With the current forecast calling for cool nights through the weekend and the combination of adequate soil moisture and healthy green leaves, Vermont foresters are predicting an excellent fall season. In the early stages of fall foliage, the best color can generally be found in higher elevations, the northern sections of the state, and in low-lying areas where red maples are the early sentinels of the seasonal change.‘The cool nights that are in the forecast may pop a little more color our way by the end of the week,’ says Ginger Anderson, Chief of Forest Management for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. Early morning temperatures are forecasted to dip into the upper 30s this week.Forest health aerial surveys over the North East Kingdom revealed that color in the red maple is developing well, particularly in the wetlands, Anderson said.  In general, higher elevations will offer the most panoramic views of emerging color across the valleys, and many swamp or marsh areas will offer some of the most vivid and varied early season change. ‘I am also seeing scattered bits of other color, mostly weather and/or fungal related but overall leaf cover is good and I am anticipating a good color season in my little area,’ said Lamoille Country Forester  Raymond Toolan.To the south, Bennington Country Forester Chris Stone reports that ‘The beginnings for the foliage in Bennington County are now mostly found among the red maples that occupy the wetlands along Route 9 as you pass over the Green Mountains between Wilmington and Bennington, and to a lesser extent in the wetlands along Route 7 between Bennington and Manchester.’Best Bets:  Route 108 through Smugglers’ Notch between Stowe and Cambridge is showing early color, as is Routes 242 and 100 near Jay Peak, Routes 116 and 5A in the Lake Willoughby area.The higher elevations of the Worcester Range and Mount Elmore along Route 12 north of Montpelier are tinged with early color, as are views from Interstate 89 between Barre and Bolton.Note:  Road Conditions Updates ‘ Repairs in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene are proceeding as quickly as possible on the state’s key east-west roads.  Travel time may be delayed as roads open to traffic while construction is continuing in work zones. Travelers will encounter gravel surfaces and occasional one-way traffic on sections of these roads.  Detailed reports on the status of all affected roads and bridges are updated twice daily on:  www.aot.state.vt.us(link is external)The Vermont Hospitality Council advises making advance reservations, especially for weekends, because the most popular lodgings may fill early in late September and the first two weekends in October.  Some innkeepers may require a minimum two-night stay, especially on busy weekends.   Vermont tourism officials encourage visitors to take advantage of midweek specials during the foliage season as part of its statewide ‘Midweek Peek’ promotion.Also available on the website are several tools for planning a Vermont Fall Foliage tour: Fall Foliage ForecasterLodging Availability ForecasterScenic DrivesFall Travel Tips For more information, visit www.VermontVacation.com(link is external).last_img read more

U.S. Moratorium on New Coal Leases Draws Critics and Advocates

first_imgU.S. Moratorium on New Coal Leases Draws Critics and Advocates FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Dennis Webb for the Grand Junction (Colo.) Daily Sentinel:Pro-coal advocates are working to turn out in force Thursday when the Bureau of Land Management holds a meeting in Grand Junction to gather input on possible reforms to the federal coal program.The meeting is one of six being held around the country, and supporters from Colorado and beyond are expected to show up to speak on the industry’s behalf as it struggles locally and nationally with mine layoffs and shutdowns, bankruptcies and other setbacks.Advocates for reforming the federal coal program or even ending coal mining altogether also will be attending, although one of them, Jeremy Nichols of WildEarth Guardians, said probably not in the same numbers as the industry supporters. He’s sympathetic with their desire to rally on the industry’s behalf.“The coal industry should be proud of what it’s done for this state. Nobody’s saying that we should not acknowledge the great stuff that they’ve brought over the years, but it’s time to move on,” from coal mining, he said.Nichols plans to reiterate his group’s call to leave coal in the ground due to its air-pollution and climate-change impacts, but also for the federal government to step up efforts to help coal miners and communities shift away from coal economically.“We can get behind good policies that acknowledge the need to give communities in Delta County and Craig tools to transition,” he said.The future of Peabody Energy’s Twentymile Mine between Craig and Steamboat Springs is currently up in the air following Peabody’s decision to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization and the failure of Bowie Resource Partners to be able to complete a deal to buy the mine.Meanwhile, in the North Fork Valley, Oxbow Mining has permanently closed its Elk Creek Mine, Bowie has idled its Bowie No. 2 Mine, and Arch Coal, which also is in bankruptcy reorganization, recently laid off 80 miners. Combined, the valley has seen the loss of many hundreds of mining jobs in recent years.Coal companies have faced slowdowns in national and international markets, in part due to increased competition from natural gas as a power-plant fuel source and also due to increased regulations aimed at reducing air pollutants and carbon emissions.Nichols said it’s also important for the Interior Department to get on board when it comes to helping coal communities transition to more diverse economies.“If they don’t, it’s just going to lead to I think more disaster for communities in the West,” Nichols said.Full article: Coal advocates look to unite at meetinglast_img read more

Xcel Gets Texas OK For 1.2 GW Of New Wind Power

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:Texas regulators on Friday approved Xcel Energy’s $1.6 billion, 1.2 GW wind expansion plan, about a month after New Mexico first gave its OK.Xcel will build and own two wind farms, one in each state, along with signing a power purchase agreement (PPA) with NextEra Energy Resources for 230 MW at the Bonita project in Texas. Xcel said customers will begin seeing fuel savings once the facilities are completed in 2021. The company expects average monthly fuel savings of about $2 for a typical residential customer.As coal-fired power in Texas struggles to compete against gas-fired and renewable power, the planned addition of nearly 4,000 MW of wind capacity means it could exceed coal in Texas as soon as this year.Xcel’s Hale project in Texas and Sagamore facility in New Mexico will combine to provide 1 GW and are expected online in 2019 and 2020, respectively. Energy for the Bonita PPA with NextEra will be generated at facilities in Cochran and Crosby counties in Texas.David Hudson, president of Xcel’s New Mexico and Texas operations, said in a statement that the “new wind farms will help power a growing regional economy with clean energy while providing the lowest-cost generating resource on our system. Not only will these wind farms save customers money, but they’ll also preserve precious water resources and spur regional economic activity.”Xcel said the project will save hundreds of millions of dollars in fuel costs over 30 years by offsetting generation from the region’s conventional power plants. The two facilities Xcel Energy will build also qualify for 100% of the federal production tax credit; those benefits will be passed on to customers, the company said.More: Texas Regulators Approve Xcel’s $1.6 Billion Wind Expansion Xcel Gets Texas OK For 1.2 GW Of New Wind Powerlast_img read more

BRO Athletes: Eli Woodward Takes on the Adirondacks

first_imgIt was a crisp, beautiful morning in Rochester, New York. My cousins and I were wide eyed and bushy tailed. Before making the two hour trek to the Adirondacks, we went riding at a local bike park. We unloaded our bikes, and I headed for the trails. I was in my zone. I felt unstoppable…for about 15 minutes. I always start out too hard, but soon I found my groove. It was one of those normal rides where nothing really happens. All I remember was washing out on a slick corner and being ticked off the rest of the ride because I didn’t have my GoPro on.As I came out of the woods an hour later, I saw my little cousins shredding the slalom run. I decided to hit it myself. The slalom was sandy, and I almost slid out on all of the berms. Going towards the bottom and seeing the jump in sight, I thought to myself, “Let’s air it out big time.”Well I did. But it got a little sketchy. My right foot unclipped in mid-air, and somehow, I clipped back in before I landed. My little cousin Elias said, “You meant to do that, right? Because it looked pretty awesome.” I laughed to myself and said,”Yeah, I sure did. On the ride home, we were all stoked and ready to go to the Adirondacks.We got to my grandmas house, and I was told that I couldn’t take my bike. I wasn’t happy but thought it might be nice to take a break from bikes and do some other stuff like hiking and kayaking. I immediately regretted my decision when we got to the campsite and I saw a sign that said Chair Lift.Once we got settled, we went for a short hike. We encountered some great vistas and walked through what could have passed for an enchanted forest. But after one of the steepest climbs, it became less enchanting when, despite the bug spray we’d all slathered on, each of us were eaten alive. I started thinking to myself, “I need a bike so I can get out of this place faster.” An hour later, I came across a sign that told us the exit was 3 miles away.“So much for a few miles,” my mom said.My cousin, Brooks, and I went ahead and after about 40 minutes we came across a road that took us back to our cabin. My Aunt Jan made a hot dog dinner. I’m not a fan of hot dogs, but that night I had four and immediately passed out.Screen Shot 2015-07-27 at 2.21.44 PMThe next day, we  set out on an awesome kayaking adventure. Being on the water that early in the morning was incredibly peaceful, and swimming in the lake afterwards wasn’t bad either. After doing too many front flips off the diving board, my cousins and I went up to the game room to play ping-pong, which quickly turned into ping-pong dodge ball. Let’s just say we had red marks all over our bodies after that. Once we got back to our cabin, we were toast. So I took one of my signature 2 hour naps.When I woke up, my grandma and I decided to embark on a canoe ride. Her plan was to put me up front while she steered from the back. Halfway through, I thought to myself, “I‘m so out of shape. I don’t remember canoeing being this hard.” Then I looked back to see my grandma laying back and relaxing.I thought she was sleeping, so I yelled, “Grandma, It’s a lot easier when you contribute!” She told me to keep on rowing, and she would help when she felt up to it. When we got back to the dock I was spent. My grandma said, “Great job Eli. You take after your parents.” Both my parents were rowers at Purdue University. We went back to our cabin, ate a great dinner with some new friends, and drifted off to sleep.last_img read more

Alabama Pipeline Explodes

first_imgShelby County, Ala.—One worker was killed and several more were injured when an Alabama pipeline ruptured sometime during the evening of Monday, October 31.According to Alabama Governor Robert Bentley, the failing pipeline caused an explosion that sent flames high above the surrounding tree line.One eye witness, who said he helped an injured worker remove gas from himself before calling an ambulance, said the central Alabama explosion resembled an airplane crash and resulted in towering flames that extended some 300 feet into the air.screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-6-52-38-amThe epicenter was approximately one mile west of a leak that occurred back in September, releasing thousands of gallons of gasoline and causing shortages and price hikes throughout the entire Southeast.The failed pipeline belongs to the same company behind the previous leak—the Colonial Pipeline Company of Alpharetta, Georgia—and marks the sixth leak its operations have endured this year in Alabama alone.Officials are not certain wether the explosion emanated from the same pipeline that failed in September, and workers have not yet been able to get close enough to the accident site to determine if the initial explosion has damaged any other nearby pipelines.screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-6-56-52-am“Three miles around the area of the fire has been evacuated,” Bentley said in a video which his office posted to Vimeo and later tweeted out through his official Twitter account. “We have state resources in place through our forestry association, and we have people there to contain the fire.”The state of Alabama has been suffering from a severe drought. According to the governor, there have been over one thousand fires recorded since the beginning of October.“Our resources have been stretched thin,” Bentley said. “But we will have enough resources in place, we will put enough resources in place, to protect the people in that area.”Coleen Vansant with the Alabama Forestry Commission says that the explosion has sparked several wildfires, one around 10 acres in size and another near 7 acres.According to a brief statement issued by the Colonial Pipeline Company, the main pipeline in the area has been shut down for the time being. The explosion occurred near the Cahaba River, the longest free-flowing river in Alabama known for its scenic value and biological diversity.It comes at a time when pipelines all over the country are being hotly contested by environmentalists. A major protest is taking place near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation because of a proposed pipeline that the Dakota Sioux say is threatening the quality of drinking water drawn from the Missouri River and decimating many of their important cultural heritage sites.The Dakota Access Pipeline is being maintained and constructed by a company called Energy Transfer which, according to its website, operates three major crude oil pipelines, including approximately 500 miles of pipeline that run through Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia.Energy Transfer claims that the $3.7 billion project will lessen U.S. dependance on foreign oil and create thousands of jobs.Stayed tuned to BlueRidgeOutdoors.com for pipeline updates and learn more about the Shelby County, Alabama pipeline explosion here.last_img read more

Cumberland River Challenge September 23rd, 2017

first_imgThe Cumberland River Challenge Canoe & Kayak Race is an annual event, hosted by Union College, U- Canoe and Barbourville Tourism. The race consists of 15 miles of river, ranging from calm water to beginner-level rapids. The race starts on the Knox County line bordering Bell County and finishes in Knox County at the Thompson RV Park. Annual “bragging rights” and awards are presented at the end of the race.In March of 2017, we joined with The Explorer Kentucky Initiative to add The Cumberland River Challenge to The Kentucky Waterman Series as a points race for it’s competitors. The inaugural season will consist of 12 races on Kentucky waterways from all across the state. Participation is required in 4 races in order to receive a ranking in the series. It will be a great way to introduce our competitors to other paddlers from around the state and share the beauty of our area to individuals who have never viewed the Cumberland.After paddling or spectating along the Cumberland River take time to enjoy Barbourville.Barbourville is a town rich in history with many firsts: 1750 Visit Dr. Thomas Walker State Park and see a replica of the first cabin in Kentucky 1775 First Trails and Roads—The Wilderness Road, Warriors Path and the Daniel Boone Trail known as the Boone Trace all cross in Knox County. 1800 Barbourville is the oldest town and was the largest and most progressive city south of Richmond 1861 Barbourville is the site of the first battle of the Civil War with casualties 1879 Union College, the first college in the mountainsPlease make plans to attend a festival or event, visit the Civil War Interpretative Park, Knox Historical Museum, Thompson RV Park, eat some great grub at our own KCBS BBQ Competition, Barbourville Water Park, fish along the Cumberland River or canoe, Hike ‘n Bike at Sandy Bottoms or at Union College’s Turner Outdoor Center, or cruise the night away with our newest event Knox Street Thunder.last_img read more