Injury Prevention Program Launched in Schools

first_img The program was started in 2002 as a pilot project in some Nova Scotia schools. It provides a number of safety activities and resources that can be adapted into school subject areas, including activities that allow students to practice their critical thinking skills. “We know that when children participate in the Risk Watch program it does have an impact and lives are saved,” said Paul Kells, president and founder of Safe Communities Canada. “The Department of Education, Halifax Regional School Board, Halifax Fire and Emergency Service and Halifax Regional Municipal Safe Communities Coalition are commended for their leadership and commitment to making the lives of our children safe right across the province.” Preventable injuries kill and disable more young Nova Scotians between age one and 25 than all other causes combined. Injuries cost Nova Scotians $570 million each year and have devastating impacts on families, friends, schools and communities. In response, Nova Scotia is the first province in Canada to adopt a comprehensive injury prevention strategy. Children and youth are two of the priority groups identified in the strategy. motor vehicle safety fires and burns poisoning falls and playground injuries firearm injuries bike and pedestrian safety water and ice safety choking, suffocation and strangulation A new school-based safety program will keep children safer by helping them strengthen their knowledge of injury prevention. Nova Scotia is the first province in Canada to launch Risk Watch, a comprehensive injury prevention program for Primary to Grade 8 students. The program teaches children how to make safer choices, resist peer pressure and influence family members and others around them to take action to reduce risks. “We have a responsibility to teach our children how to recognize and avoid everyday risks that can lead to injury,” said Education Minister Karen Casey. “The Risk Watch program enhances the way students are learning to live and play safely.” The resource is provided to schools by the Halifax Regional Municipality Safe Communities Coalition, Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency Service and the Department of Education. “The majority of injuries children encounter throughout their childhood are preventable and predictable,” said Bill Mosher, chief director of the Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency Service. “Elementary schools across the region and the province can use Risk Watch to incorporate safety lessons into daily activities in classrooms from Primary to Grade 8. Risk Watch will ultimately instill safer behaviours in future generations and help prevent injuries from occurring in the first place.” The Risk Watch program helps students learn about the eight leading causes of childhood injuries, which are: last_img read more

First Confirmed Case of Zika Virus in Nova Scotia

first_img using insect repellent with DEET or Icaridin on exposed skin sleeping under a bed net if accommodations are outdoors or not enclosed booking accommodations that are well-screened or completely enclosed with air conditioning covering up with light-coloured clothing, long-sleeves, long pants and shoes, not sandals. Nova Scotia has identified its first confirmed case of Zika virus. A female traveller acquired the virus while visiting a country affected by the outbreak. The woman was not hospitalized and has since recovered. “The risk of Zika to Nova Scotians and Canadians is extremely low. We are not aware of any cases transmitted by mosquitos to humans that originated in Canada,” said Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Frank Atherton. “Nova Scotians travelling to Zika-affected countries, especially women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, should take preventative measures to reduce their exposure to mosquitos.” The Zika virus is primarily passed to people through mosquitos that carry the virus. The risk of Zika-infected mosquitos in Nova Scotia is very unlikely, as these mosquitos are unable to survive in our climate. The virus has been transmitted through sexual activity but that is very rare. Upon their return from a Zika-affected country, men should use condoms for six months, with any partner who could become pregnant. Women who return from a Zika-affected area should wait at least two months before trying to become pregnant. Nova Scotians travelling to a Zika virus affected area can protect themselves by: For more information on Zika-affected areas visit www.healthycanadians.gc.ca .last_img read more

Pak shells forward posts along LoC in Poonch Rajouri

first_imgJammu: The Pakistan Army on Friday violated ceasefire by firing and mortar shelling on forward posts and civilian areas along the LoC in three sectors of Jammu and Kashmir’s Rajouri and Poonch districts, drawing befitting retaliation from Indian troops, a defence PRO said. “At about 0800 hours today, Pak army initiated unprovoked ceasefire violation with firing of small arms & later shelling with mortars along LoC in Mankote, Krishna Ghati sectors of Poonch district and Nowshera sector of Rajouri district@, Defence Public Relations Officer (PRO) told PTI. Also Read – Squadrons which participated in Balakot air strike awarded citations on IAF Day The Indian Army is retaliating beffitingly, he said, adding that there was no casualty or injury to anyone in the firing and shelling. Pakistan troops also targeted civilian areas in Mankote area triggering fear psychosis among them, the officials said. It may be recalled that Pakistan army resorted to firing and shelling of mortars along LoC in Nowshera Sector in Rajouri district last Friday. The Indian Army reported 1,248 cases of ceasefire violations (CFVs) and four casualties along the Line of Control this year, Defence Minister Rajnath Singh said on Tuesday. Also Read – SC declines Oil Min request to stay sharing of documents on Reliance penalty In a written response to a question in the Rajya Sabha, Singh said that January saw 203 cases of CFVs, followed by 215 in February. There were 267 cases of CFVs in March and the army reported three casualties, he said. April and May reported 234 and 221 cases of CFVs, respectively. June recorded 108 cases of CFVs with one battle casualty. Appropriate retaliation to the ceasefire violations, as required, has been carried out by the Indian Army, Singh said.last_img read more

Teen Meets Jeremy Kyle Thanks To MakeAWish

first_imgA British teenager recently got to meet TV host Jeremy Kyle thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation in the UK.Destiny Meets Jeremy Kyle18-year-old Destiny Boyton, from Worcester, was born with Cerebral Palsy. Destiny loves watching Jeremy Kyle because of the lively, interactive nature of the show and never misses an episode, even when in hospital – so Make-A-Wish arranged for her to meet her favourite TV presenter!Destiny was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at birth and has three types of epilepsy. Surgery to fix her curving spine resulted in acid reflux during and after the operation, which burnt her lungs and left her very susceptible to chest infections. She has breathing problems and attends hospital twice a year to have antibiotics inserted into her veins to prevent infections.Upon arrival at the studios, Destiny was taken to meet her favourite star, Jeremy Kyle! After chatting and signing autographs, Destiny was given a tour of the studios by Jeremy and programme psychologist Graham Stanier. She then spent the rest of the day as a VIP in the Green Room, watching the show being recorded.Mum Carolynne sayd: “The wish helped Destiny take her mind off her condition and allowed her to be herself – she was treated as Destiny and not just the girl in the wheelchair. Destiny was a VIP for the day and we have so many special memories to treasure. The best moment was seeing her face light up when Jeremy opened the door to her – it was amazing.”Jeremy Kyle said: “Make-A-Wish does fantastic work granting wishes of children with life-threatening conditions and it was a real pleasure to have met Destiny and spend time with her on set. She was a very engaged young lady and everyone involved in the show enjoyed showing her round backstage and getting to know her.”To help Make-A-Wish keep granting wishes to children like Destiny, click here.Source:Make-A-Wish UKlast_img read more

Did Justin Trudeau unfairly smear small business owners as tax dodgers

OTTAWA — “I think small businesses should be paying less taxes, we just have to make sure that it’s done right … We have to know that a large percentage of small businesses are actually just ways for wealthier Canadians to save on their taxes and we want to reward the people who are actually creating jobs.” Justin Trudeau, in an interview with the CBC’s Peter Mansbridge, broadcast on Sept. 8.The Liberal leader’s political adversaries have pounced on that comment, accusing Trudeau of maligning the businesses that create the lion’s share of jobs.NDP MP Malcolm Allen demanded that Trudeau apologize “for smearing small business owners as tax cheats.”“He simply doesn’t understand the reality facing mom and pop shops — hard-working small business owners who create the vast majority of new jobs.”Defence Minister Jason Kenney chimed in via Twitter: “Small business are the heroes of our economy, but J Trudeau says ‘a large percentage’ are just tax dodges for the rich.”Both the NDP and Conservatives are promising to reduce the small business tax rate to nine per cent from 11 per cent. Trudeau has made the same commitment, but with some “tweaking” to ensure it’s not being used as a tax dodge.Did Trudeau unfairly malign small businesses or was his assertion correct?Spoiler Alert: The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney.”This one earns a rating of “a little baloney” — it is mostly accurate but more information is required.William Watson: What will they do on Day 500?Canada’s rebounding economyHere’s why:Various academic and think tank studies have found that reductions in the small business tax rate disproportionately benefit wealthy individuals who incorporate their businesses in order to reduce their personal income tax burden, split income with family “shareholders” and avoid capital gains taxes.In a 2011 paper for the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy, economists Jack Mintz and Duanjie Chen concluded that reducing the small business tax rate actually discourages the growth of companies and, therefore, of job creation.Among other problems, they wrote: “Many small businesses are created to enable individuals to reduce personal tax rather than grow companies … With corporate organization, it is easier to split income among family members holding shares of a corporation.”The duo also argued that preferential tax treatment for small businesses creates a negative “threshold effect,” wherein a small company “may stop growing simply to preserve the tax savings associated with the definition of smallness.” And it could result in larger companies breaking up into smaller units in order to save on taxes.Another study, co-authored in 2014 by Michael Wolfson, Canada’s former assistant chief statistician, found that the wealthiest Canadians disproportionately take advantage of the preferential small business tax rate.From 2001 to 2011, that study found that fewer than five per cent of Canadian taxpayers in the bottom half of the income scale owned at least 10 per cent of the shares in at least one Canadian-controlled private corporation (CCPC). By contrast, as much as 80 per cent of taxpayers in the top 0.01 per cent of income earners were CCPC owners.In another study soon to be published in the Canadian Tax Journal, Wolfson and economist Scott Legree linked personal income tax returns to corporate returns. They found the federal treasury lost at least half a billion dollars in tax revenue that would have been paid had individuals not been able to funnel their personal income through corporations.And that’s a conservative estimate because the study did not include families who funnelled income through corporations to children no longer living under the same roof.“The popular rhetoric is that the special low small business tax rate that is available to CCPCs is designed to support small businesses, in part because they face greater challenges than large businesses in areas such as financing and because they are believed to be major sources of job creation and entrepreneurship,” concludes the study.“However, our analysis suggests that roughly half a billion dollars annually is foregone in ways related primarily to income splitting, where no such benefits are generated.”THE EXPERTS:Based on his research, Mintz told the Huffington Post earlier this year that “60 per cent of the small business deduction goes to households with more than $150,000 in income. That’s because you tend to have a relatively high number of high-income households who own small businesses.”However, Wolfson said about 70 per cent of what the tax act defines as small businesses are owned by the bottom 90 per cent of income earners.Still, he added: “A highly disproportionate number is owned by the top 1 per cent and the top 0.01 per cent. So like most things, a bit of nuance is required.”Trudeau’s concern about an untargeted reduction in the small business tax rate being used by wealthy Canadians to save on their tax bills is warranted, in Wolfson’s view, but one could quibble about his assertion that a “large percentage” of small businesses are doing so.“If you’re saying it’s bigger than 50 per cent, I don’t think so” Wolfson said. “If you’re saying is this something that really should be zero and even one or two per cent would be offensive — and in fact it’s five or 10 per cent — then that five or 10 could be a large number. So it depends on your frame of reference.”THE VERDICT:Trudeau’s concern about the wealthy using the preferential small business tax rate to avoid paying personal income tax is warranted. However, saying “a large percentage” do so is open to debate. He would have been on safer ground had he been either more precise or more vague — the studies would have supported saying “many” or “too many” small businesses are tax scams.For these reasons, Trudeau’s assertion earns a rating of “a little baloney.”The Canadian Press read more

Saskatchewan Government Insurance records 845M profit in 201516

REGINA – Saskatchewan Government Insurance says it had a profit of $84.5 million last year despite flooding and forest fires.The Crown insurer says both sides of its operations saw strong results.The Saskatchewan Auto Fund handles the province’s compulsory public coverage for drivers, while SGI Canada deals with property and home insuranceDon McMorris, minister responsible for SGI, says profitability in 2015-16 was due to favourable underwriting results and investment earnings.McMorris also says SGI Canada achieved growth in the five provinces where it operates, despite economic downturns in Alberta and Saskatchewan.SGI says there were a relatively low number of damage and injury claims, and a mild winter and recent traffic safety initiatives helped.Some 121 fatalities were the lowest number in quite some time, the insurer said.SGI Canada is the competitive arm of SGI and sells property and casualty insurance in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and British Columbia.(CTV Regina) by The Canadian Press Posted Jul 18, 2016 2:46 pm MDT Last Updated Jul 18, 2016 at 3:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Saskatchewan Government Insurance records $84.5M profit in 2015-16 read more

Hearings for Burkina FasoNiger border case end at UN International Court of

The Hague-based ICJ, also known as the World Court, has been asked to delineate the border between the two nations from the so-called Tong-Tong marker to the start of the Botou bend.During the hearings, Burkina Faso explained that the delimitation of the disputed part should be based on a 1927 French colonial decree, when both countries were part of French West Africa, while Niger contended that the decree was not precise enough to define the frontier in certain areas and asked the Court to delimit it by using a 1960 map of the French Institut Géographique as adjusted with factual evidence of territorial sovereignty.As a result, the frontier line put forward by Niger runs south-west of the one offered by Burkina Faso, with the biggest disagreement relating to the Bossebangou area in the centre of the disputed sector.Established in 1945 under the UN Charter, the ICJ is one of the six principal organs of the world body. It settles legal disputes between States and gives advisory opinions on legal questions that have been referred to it by authorized UN organs or specialized agencies. read more

Toronto Raptors dramatic win produces record television ratings in Canada

The greatest moment in Toronto Raptors history produced the biggest television ratings in Canada for an NBA game.Sportsnet says Sunday night’s Game 7 between the Raptors and visiting Philadelphia 76ers attracted an average audience of 2.2 million viewers.A peak audience of 3.8 million was watching when Kawhi Leonard hit the buzzer-beater to lift the Raptors to a win over the visiting Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA Eastern Conference semifinal.The Sunday night tipoff – traditionally a strong evening for TV ratings – and the fact no Canadian teams are left in the NHL playoffs gave the Raptors the sporting spotlight in this country.Sportsnet says its average audience for the four games it showed during the second-round series was 1.3 million viewers, a 113 per-cent increase over the same round for the Raptors last year.The 2.2-million figure is a big jump over a typical Raptors game. TSN reported it attracted a regular-season Raptors record audience of 710,000 for DeMar DeRozan’s return to Toronto with the San Antonio Spurs in February.TSN had a then-record average audience of 1.8 million for a Raptors playoff game in 2016 as Toronto beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in a third-round contest.The NBA has said viewership in the regular season was up 29 per cent from last year.The Raptors begin the Eastern Conference final on Wednesday night in Milwaukee against the Bucks. read more

The US Womens Soccer Teams Chances At Equal Pay

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Embed Code FiveThirtyEight This week, Hot Takedown is taking a focused look at the lawsuit filed by the U.S. women’s soccer team in advance of the 2019 Women’s World Cup. Twenty-eight players have sued the U.S. Soccer Federation, claiming patterns of gender-based discrimination. One of the plaintiffs is USWNT defender Becky Sauerbrunn, who released the following statement:“The bottom line is simple: it is wrong for us to be paid and valued less for our work because of our gender. Every member of this team works incredibly hard to achieve the success that we have had for the USSF. We are standing up now so that our efforts, and those of future USWNT players, will be fairly recognized.”To unpack this lawsuit and assess the U.S. women’s 2019 World Cup chances, we’re joined by journalist and author Caitlin Murray, whose book, “The National Team: The Inside Story of the Women Who Changed Soccer,” is out now.Finally, our Rabbit Hole fields an imaginary baseball team full of the most preposterous injuries that have plagued players of the sport. Who knew pillows could be so dangerous?Here’s what we’re looking at:Brooks Koepka’s historic performance at the PGA Championship.Bodexpress’s solo ride at the Preakness States that captured America’s heart.Michael McCann’s analysis of the USWNT lawsuit for Sports Illustrated.Excuse us while we try not to laugh at Johan Camargo’s epic fall. read more

SFNQ formed to advance Labrador Trough rail feasibility study

first_imgLac Otelnuk Mining (LOM) is joining Champion Iron Ltd and the Government of Québec in a partnership formed for the purpose of carrying out a feasibility study regarding a new multi-user rail link between the Port of Sept-Îles and the Labrador Trough.LOM is a joint venture company that holds the Lac Otelnuk Property in Nunavik, Québec, of which Adriana owns 40% and WISCO International Resources Development & Investment Limited owns 60%.The special purpose entity called La Société ferroviaire du Nord québécois, société en commandite (SFNQ) is open to other mining companies to join. SFNQ is a partnership of government and industry established to manage the feasibility study.The SFNQ was formed recently, following the tabling by the Québec government of its 2014-2015 budget in June, as a partnership of government and industry and assigned the responsibility of managing the implementation of the Feasibility Study for a new Labrador Trough rail line.The Québec government has set aside a maximum of C$20 million from its Plan Nord Fund to contribute to the study. For its part, Champion’s contribution of sunk costs is valued up to C$6 million. Among other major economic and wide-reaching social benefits, the new rail infrastructure when developed will enhance the Québec-based mining industry’s ability to service world markets with competitive long-term tariffs.Champion’s subsidiary Champion Iron Mines Limited is a founding partner of the SFNQ, which is open to all miners in the region.Champion’s Chairman and CEO Michael O’Keeffe said, “The SFNQ partnership includes the Government of Québec and fellow mining group Lac Otelnuk Mining Ltd, with an open invitation to others from within industry to join this important initiative”.“A range of partners will ensure the study considers the concerns of all potential rail link users and in doing so advocates a multi-user system favouring a final outcome encouraging joint investment.  Champion is pleased to be a part of the SFNQ partnership,” O’Keeffe said.In June this year, Champion welcomed the Government’s decision to commit to the funding of a feasibility study to determine the optimum rail option of a new rail link for iron ore miners in the Labrador Trough.The company has been a strong and longstanding advocate of the multi-user rail feasibility study and remains committed to supporting the government and the industry in Québec through its participation as an industry partner in the SFNQ.O’Keeffe said that the company is excited to be a founding partner of the SFNQ and for the opportunity to be part of the overall Plan Nord project, created by the government to enhance the economic, industrial and social potential of the northern region of Québec.The study could lead to one of the largest sustainable development projects in the world, with a government that is putting the necessary conditions in place to facilitate the efforts of the private sector to deliver the immense economic potential of northern Québec while respecting social and environmental considerations.O’Keeffe said that the prospective development of any new rail infrastructure would necessarily involve all aspects of the community, not just the mining industry, and requires the support of the First Nations and key stakeholders.Champion is set to benefit from the development of rail infrastructure in the region, with 14 fully owned projects situated in the highly prospective Fermont Iron Ore District in northern Québec, and with overall Canadian National Instrument (NI 43-101) compliant resource of some 5,300 Mt grading on average 29% Fe.last_img read more

KEFI making good progress at Tulu Kapi

first_imgAsa Bridle of Cantor Fitzgerald reports that “KEFI and its operational partners on the Tulu Kapi gold project in Ethiopia continue to make progress with development plans and costings being formalised, and the community resettlement program moving forward. The project could also benefit economically if gold’s move through $1,300/oz can be maintained. The company expects to begin to draw down on the $140 million project loan in 2Q18 in parallel with the community resettlement program and the start of the construction and procurement process. We continue to believe that the project’s value is still unrecognised in KEFI’s share price. Away from Ethiopia, the rolling out of a new minerals policy in Saudi Arabia should allow KEFI’s JV in the country to reactivate its exploration program once the new policy details have been clarified.”At Tulu Kapi the project contactors have confirmed costings and schedule for the final project models. The Mining Licence transfer to TKGM has been cleared and execution is in process. The community compensation surveys, calculations and negotiations have been completed. The Ethiopian Electricity Power Corporation and Ethiopian Roads Authority have confirmed their budget and schedule commitment to construct the project’s off-site infrastructure and the National Bank of Ethiopia (central bank) has approved most administrative requests and is engaging on the remaining issues. The company also highlights that its previously published project NPV would rise 24% to $92 million at the start of construction and 16% to $131 million at the start of production if a base case $1,300/oz gold price is used versus. the previous $1,250/oz assumption.KEFI owns 95% of the project with a Probable Ore Reserve of 1.0 Moz and Mineral Resources totalling 1.7 Moz. Planned gold production at Tulu Kapi is forecast to be circa 115,000 oz/y at an AISC of $777/oz over the initial eight years of mining the open pit.The company has announced that it has terminated its relationship with Oryx with the other existing consortium members (Government of Ethiopia, contractors Lycopodium and Ausdrill/African Mining Services) still performing all the various required roles as previously outlined. KEFI will now deal directly with the arranger of the bond and the company still expects to meet its drawdown target of 2Q18 to match with the community resettlement programme and the triggering of procurement and construction. In terms of equity financing, KEFI has again flagged the possibility of additional project-level equity investment in the order of 20% on the same terms as the Ethiopian Government’s agreement (implied project EV of circa $100 million), leaving KEFI shareholders with a 55% stake in the project.As expected, a new minerals policies has been announced by the Saudi Government to facilitate growth in the sector. KEFI and its 60% Saudi JV partner, ARTAR, have been waiting for this development to rejuvenate the JV’s plans. The JV’s portfolio has been upgraded and now has pegged much of a major structural volcanic hosted massive sulphides (VHMS) belt.The 40%-owned Jibal Qutman project in Saudi Arabia has Mineral Resources totalling 0.7 Moz.last_img read more

Licensing and permitting ensuring a successful diamond core drilling programme

first_imgThe only thing consistent about licensing and permitting is how inconsistent and variable it is from place to place, says Boart Longyear’s Thomas Feehan*.Laws, regulations, permits, licensing, and requirements can be different based on the country, state/province, city, and land ownership. Consequently, there is little information about the broader topic of licensing and permitting to help ensure a successful diamond core drilling project.RisksDesigning and planning a drilling project is a complex exercise. Many risk factors should be considered to mitigate issues that could impact productivity and/or budgets. These include permitting and licensing, which could ultimately impede the success of the project. After careful planning, there is a healthy amount of cautious optimism that everything has been properly addressed and planned for, however, there is always that small chance something was missed.The risks are costly if your project doesn’t have everything in place when it comes to licensing and permitting.While it doesn’t happen very often, paying a drilling contractor stand-by rates waiting for a project that’s been scheduled, but not properly authorised or permitted, takes money from the project.How much more exploration could have been achieved with the money lost by paying for services and support that can’t happen because a project is delayed on a technicality – usually paperwork?There’s a risk of reputation as well. Costly mistakes aren’t great for anyone’s career or a company’s reputation.ChallengesWhile Boart Longyear is no expert in licensing and permitting, the experts are out there. We maintain working relationships with local consulting and engineering firms and you should too. When planning a diamond core exploratory drilling project, it is highly recommended that you ensure all licence and permit requirements are met before the drill crew and necessary equipment mobilises.Additionally, careful planning for the size of the drill pad for the permits and figuring out the logistics of accessing a site can save time and money later. That way, a budget estimate for all aspects of the work can be adequately prepared to complete a project safely and effectively.Drill pad layout can be critical to a safe, smooth, and successful drilling programme. A drill pad setup where safety or productivity is compromised can result in wasted expense and possibly lead to an accident. Not having permits with the right amount of surface disturbance for the project is a risk that can be mitigated with communication. A miscalculation in required disturbance area can lead to holes being removed from the scope of the project to remain in compliance with regulators.Working diligently with all stakeholders in the permitting application process helps ensure the exploration/project team(s) and the environmental/permitting team(s) are on the same page. A simple oversight or misunderstanding can possibly delay site mobilisation or start-up. Ideally, these conversations should happen early in the planning stages of the drilling programme.One of the biggest challenges of licensing and permitting for a diamond core drilling project is timing. Depending on workload and resources, government entities are not typically known for their speed. Early planning and working with experts can ensure the timing of licensing and permitting doesn’t affect your project start date. Obtaining most permits and licences takes longer than expected in most cases. Proper planning and early submission to agencies are highly recommended.*This article was written by Boart Longyear‘s Thomas Feehan. Feehan holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Geology, a Master’s Degree in Hydrogeology, and a Master’s Degree in Business. He has 28 years of experience in mining with 24 of those years specialising in drilling programmes, lithium brines, mineral exploration, geotechnical/slope stability investigations, mining-related hydrogeology, mine dewatering and water resourceslast_img read more

Eaux de baignade lUE estime que la plupart des eaux européennes sont

first_imgEaux de baignade : l’UE estime que la plupart des eaux européennes sont de bonne qualitéSelon le rapport annuel sur la qualité des eaux de baignade européennes, publié hier par l’Agence européenne pour l’environnement (AEE), les 22.000 zones de baignade de l’Union Européenne (UE) sont de bonne qualité.Comme chaque année, l’AEE a rendu son rapport sur la qualité des eaux de baignade en Europe. D’après celui-ci, rédigé avec la Commission européenne, 94 % des eaux de baignade de l’Union répondent aux normes de qualité minimales fixées par la législation européenne. Ainsi, sur les 22.000 sites contrôlés, 78 % d’entre eux présentent une eau d’excellente qualité. Par rapport à l’année dernière, 2 % de sites supplémentaires respectent les normes minimales.À lire aussiRétention d’eau : symptômes, remèdes, causes, que faire en cas d’oedème ?Dans toute l’UE, ce sont les zones de baignade de Chypre (qui en compte 112) et du Luxembourg (11) qui sont les plus remarquables puisque tous présentent une excellente qualité de l’eau. Environ 60 % des 3.322 zones de baignade françaises ont été jugées d’excellente qualité, rapporte également 20minutes.fr.Par ailleurs, huit autre pays peuvent se féliciter de l’excellente qualité de leurs eaux de baignade, celle-ci se révélant globalement supérieure à la moyenne. Il s’agit, dans l’ordre décroissant, de Malte (avec 97 % de ses 87 zones de baignade), la Croatie (95 % de ses 919 zones), la Grèce (93 % de ses 2.155 zones), l’Allemagne (88 % de ses 2.295 zones), le Portugal (87 % de ses 526 zones), l’Italie (85 % de ses 5.509 zones), la Finlande (83 % de ses 320 zones) et l’Espagne (83 % de ses 2.156 zones).Le 23 mai 2013 à 15:22 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Poll 38 plan to introduce new benefits for all staff in 2018

first_imgEmployee Benefits poll: Over a third (38%) of respondents are planning on introducing new benefits for all of their employees in 2018.A straw poll of www.employeebenefits.co.uk readers, which received 50 responses, also found that 22% of respondents will update their existing benefits provision this year, while 20% will be shifting to a new benefits strategy focus for 2018.More than one in 10 (14%) of respondents are not planning any benefits changes for the new year, while 6% will spend 2018 focusing on complying with legislative requirement.With the new year often described as a time for new beginnings, many organisations see January as the ideal time to spring clean its benefits offering, or to implement something new. For example, health cash plan provider Simplyhealth launched its enhanced benefits and reward proposition from 1 January 2018. This included enhancing the organisation’s defined contribution (DC) pension scheme, introducing financial education and launching a flexible benefits personal spending account.Across the pond, New York utilised the new year to introduce a new state-wide paid family leave benefit for employees who are based in the city and who work in the private sector. This is due to be phased in over a four-year period, with eligible employees initially being able to take up to eight weeks of leave at 50% of their average weekly wage, up to a cap of $652.96 (£482.02) in 2018. This was effective from 1 January 2018.Would you fund an all-employee holiday or trip to boost staff motivation? Take part in our latest poll to let us know.last_img read more

Demi Lovato Brings Mental Health Front And Center During Tour

first_img Twitter The GRAMMY nominee is raising awareness for mental health while on tour through her CAST on Tour program, which kicked off Feb. 26 in San DiegoRenée FabianGRAMMYs Feb 27, 2018 – 2:24 pm As she embarks on her Tell Me You Love Me tour in support of her 2017 album of the same name, Demi Lovato isn’t just sharing her inspirational music with fans around the world, she’s making a difference by raising awareness for mental health.For the second consecutive tour, the GRAMMY nominee is again bringing along CAST on Tour, an initiative of the mental health advocacy organization CAST Foundation. She previously teamed with the recovery center during last year’s co-headlining Future Now tour with Nick Jonas.The pre-show sessions will allow Lovato and Mike Bayer, founder/CEO of CAST Centers and chairman of the CAST Foundation, to discuss mental health awareness while giving space to attendees to share their own personal experiences with mental illness.The initiative kicked off Feb. 26 in San Diego, where Lovato invited student survivors of the recent school shooting in Parkland, Fla., to attend the session. Lovato also brought the students — Julius Castillo, Mackenzie Marie Chapman, Samantha Megan Deitsch, Maia Hebron, Eden Hebron, and Sarah Stricker — onstage during her performance later in the evening, in addition to inviting the audience to donate toward mental health resources for the students impacted by the school shooting through a CAST Foundation text donation.Tonight is the night! We also have #CASTontour back!! Make sure you guys are following @castcenters and @castontour on Instagram for a chance to join us and see who is speaking — Demi Lovato (@ddlovato) February 26, 2018CAST on Tour will follow Lovato for 20 tour dates, including stops Las Vegas, Phoenix, Dallas, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Philadelphia, among others, concluding on March 31 in Tampa, Fla. Lovato’s world tour, with special guests DJ Khaled and Kehlani, will continue around the globe through June 27.”Bringing CAST on Tour was very important to me because I want to be able to reach and inspire my fans. Tonight was our first night of the tour and it was incredibly special,” Lovato said in a statement. “I was able to bring out and meet a few of the students that had to experience the shooting in Florida on the 14th. It was such an honor to meet them and hear their courageous stories. I want to make sure their voices are being heard and we can provide them with the mental health and post-trauma care they need.”Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Email Facebook Demi Lovato Advocates For Mental Health On Tour demi-lovato-brings-mental-health-front-and-center-during-tour Demi Lovato Brings Mental Health Front And Center During Tour News last_img read more

Online pharma players concerned over the overlapping powers of states in draft

first_imgThe new guidelines have led to a lot of confusion in the Indian pharma industryCreative CommonsThe central government’s draft guidelines for the online pharmacy industry have raised serious concerns for players working in the expanding space. The draft also includes a possible overlapping role of state governments.The gazette notification released by the centre on 28th August requires all the e-pharmacies to register with the apex drug regulator and central licensing authority, which is the Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation.The Economic Times reported that one the clauses of the rules also empower the state governments to cancel the registration of the players which has led to the fear of overregulation in a sector that has emerged as a growing sector over the last three years.Atul Pandey, a partner at law firm Khaitan & Co. speaking to the Economic Times said that “While the draft rules clearly mention a central licensing authority, as far as e-pharmacy marketplaces are concerned, there is also Rule 67T (3), which talks about the power of the state governments to cancel the registrations. The confusion lies around the question of where this power is coming from.”Moreover, it is also unclear the whether the offline players including selling medicines on online platforms will also have to register with the central licensing authority. Pandey also added that “There is also a requirement under existing rules for each and every drug, retailers and wholesalers to obtain a license from the state authorities. It is not clear if the online portals will have to register with the state authorities in relation with the drugs sold through the portal.”India’s pharma sector has been growing at a very healthy rate in the recent past. According to the India Brand Equity Foundation, India’s pharmaceutical sector is valued at $33 billion in 2017. Moreover, it is likely to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 22.4% over 2015–20 to reach $55 billion.Growing with this rate, the country is expected to be in the top three pharmaceutical markets by incremental growth and it is also expected to become the sixth largest market globally in absolute size by the year 2020. There are numerous opportunities in the domestic e-pharmacy market but at the current levels, it has only captured 1% of the overall pharmaceutical market. Market research shows that it is expected to reach $3 billion by 2024.last_img read more

BNP shares concerns over polls with diplomats

first_imgLogo of BNPBNP on Monday briefed foreign diplomats stationed in Dhaka about the outcome of the two-phase dialogue with the ruling alliance and the party’s various concerns about the 11th parliamentary elections, reports UNB.BNP standing committee member Abdul Moyeen Khan, on behalf of the party, also apprised the diplomats of the party’s various observations on the country’s latest political situation at a closed-door meeting at BNP chairperson’s Gulshan office, said party insiders.BNP chairperson’s adviser Sabihuddin Ahmed said they briefed the foreign envoys about the country’s latest political situation.He said the meeting began around 4pm and continued for an hour.BNP organising secretary Shama Obaed said diplomats from around 35 countries, including the USA, the UK, EU, UN, Canada, India, Pakistan, China, Japan, France, Germany and Switzerland, joined the briefing.BNP standing committee members Rafiqul Islam Miah, Gayeshwar Chandra Roy and Nazrul Islam Khan, and chairperson’s adviser Sabihuddin Ahmed were, among others, present at the meeting.Shama said the BNP leaders talked about the country’s overall situation, dialogue over the election and other political issues.Wishing anonymity, a BNP leader who was present at the meeting told UNB they informed the diplomats that though they held talks with the prime minister-led 14-party alliance twice to reach a political consensus aiming to ensure a credible election, the dialogue outcome is almost zero due to the government’s ‘rigid’ stance and non-compromising attitude.They also told the foreign envoys that their party and alliances have decided to join the election for the sake of democracy, but the government and the election commission are not taking any step for ensuring a level-playing field and holding an acceptable election.The BNP leaders also talked about the continued arrest of BNP leaders and activists in ‘fictitious’ cases despite the prime minister’s assurance to stop it.”We also informed the diplomats about the election commission’s biased role in announcing the election schedule and rescheduling it,” he said.The BNP leader said they also shared their various concerns about the election.He said the foreign envoys appreciated BNP for their decision to join the election and hoped that democracy will be consolidated in Bangladesh through a fair election.last_img read more

McClinton Leads the Cards on the First Day of the ACC Indoor

first_img800m (Pent.)11. Addie Wanner – 2:33.67 Story Links Live Results Aaron Johnson and Clay Moss ended the day sitting in fourth and eighth place, respectively. Johnson tallied 2,829 points while Moss finished with 2,562 points. Johnson set three personal best on the day, in the 60m with a time of 7.09, the shot put with a toss of 10.73m/35-02.25, and the long jump, leaping 6.66m/21-10.25. Moss set a personal best the in shot put with a mark of 10.17m/33-04.50. Long Jump (Hept.)4. Dominic McClinton – 6.68m/21-115. Aaron Johnson – 6.66m/21-10.259. Clay Moss – 6.47m/21-02.75 Shot Put (Pent.)2. Addie Wanner – 11.31m/37-01.25 Pentathlon (Final)8. Addie Wanner – 3,585 points Shot Put (Hept.)4. Dominic McClinton – 11.05m/36-036. Aaron Johnson – 10.73m/35-02.258. Clay Moss – 10.17m/33-04.50 McClinton finished the first day with 2,909 points to lead the field. He picked up indoor personal best marks in the shot put with a throw of 11.05m/36-03 and in high jump, clearing the bar at 1.96m/6-05. Addie Wanner finished eighth in the pentathlon with 3,585 points. She ran a personal best in the 60m hurdles, clocking a time of 8.96. She also set a collegiate best in the shot put with a mark of 11.31m/37-01.25. High Jump (Hept.)2. Dominic McClinton – 1.96m/6-053. Aaron Johnson – 1.90m/6-02.755. Clay Moss – 1.81m/5-11.25 Print Friendly Version High Jump (Pent.)4. Addie Wanner – 1.64m/5-04.50 Long Jump (Pent.)9. Addie Wanner – 5.22m/17-01.50 ACC Indoor ChampionshipsFebruary 21, 2019Rector Fieldhouse | Blacksburg, Va. Heptathlon (through four events)1. Dominic McClinton – 2,909 points4. Aaron Johnson – 2,829 points8. Clay Moss – 2,562 points The remaining three events of the heptathlon will begin at 10 a.m. tomorrow morning. Preliminary rounds of the running events along with field events will also start tomorrow. 60m (Hept.)3. Dominic McClinton – 7.084. Aaron Johnson – 7.098. Clay Moss – 7.42 60m Hurdles (Pent.)6. Addie Wanner – 8.96 BLACKSBURG, Va. – After the first day of competition at the ACC Indoor Track and Field Championships, Louisville’s Dominic McClinton sits in first place in the men’s heptathlon through four events.last_img read more

IBA CAREprogram – Serving Customers Long After the Sale

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration -:-Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Sponsored Content | Videos | Quality Assurance (QA) | August 20, 2015 IBA CAREprogram – Serving Customers Long After the Sale Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. This brief video highlights the grassroots effort from IBA Dosimetry to satisfy customers through value added services and benefits that continue throughout the life cycle of their products, and beyond. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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first_img Top Stories New Arizona Cardinals NFL football head coach Steve Wilks speaks, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, after being introduced at the teams’ training facility in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York) The Arizona Cardinals introduced Steve Wilks as Bruce Arians’ heir on Tuesday, and during his introductory press conference, the new head coach answered five key questions about his hiring, the process of putting together his team this offseason and what his vision for the Cardinals is moving forward.1. What stood out about Wilks?“Not just a leader with a high football IQ, but also a high football EQ (emotional quotient). He knows where the players are (emotionally) 15 minutes after they walk into the training facility and make sure where they are as people, because they aren’t going to be ready to learn and be well-coached if they’ve got any issues outside of the organization.”— Cardinals president Michael BidwillBy the sound of it, the Cardinals put a priority on hiring a leader over scheme or background. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Unsurprisingly, Wilks would approve if the 14-year veteran decided to put the pads back on.5. What will the defense look like?“I’ve coached in both systems. Most importantly and once again, we’re not going to change too much. If it’s not broke, don’t worry about trying to fix it.“I don’t have a scheme, I have a system. If you can get there with four, we’re not going to pressure a lot.”— WilksA defensive backs coach by trade, Wilks ran a 4-3 defense with Carolina last season, putting four down lineman at the line of scrimmage.Would Arizona’s personnel more suited for a 3-4 defense change a great deal?It seems like the answer is “no,” mostly because the Cardinals have quite a bit of returning talent on the roster, including one of the best cover corners in Patrick Peterson and best pass rushers in outside linebacker Chandler Jones.Wilks expressed his desire to adapt to personnel, and he said watching former head coach Norv Turner during his stint with the San Diego Chargers taught him that the NFL is about exploiting matchups — that could lead to scheme changes each and every week. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Your browser does not support the audio element. 9 Comments   Share   The new Cardinals coach did say that he wants his team to develop late-round picks, a key to running a successful team. Among those on Wilks’ own resume of players he developed: 2012 fifth-round pick Josh Norman, who developed into an All Pro three seasons later.3. About that quarterback situation …“It’s the elephant in the room. Steve and I have addressed that issue … we’re going to have a very active and aggressive plan in free agency, and we’ll see what happens in the draft.”— Wilks on the quarterback questionArizona general manager Steve Keim said he approached the lack of a starting quarterback for 2018 as a positive issue for the Cardinals in their coaching search. It gave all the candidates a blank canvas to discuss their vision.As for Wilks, let’s just say the pressure is more on his direct boss to give him a solid option under center, and preferably, a few.Wilks will cross that bridge about what he expects of his quarterback when he has one.4. Has he talked to Fitz?“I spoke with Larry, we had a very in-depth conversation. I enjoyed the conversation that he and I had. He did not express whether he was or was not coming back. We definitely want him back.”— WilksNope. Wilks doesn’t know whether receiver Larry Fitzgerald will return or retire for the 2018 season. LISTEN: Steve Wilks, Cardinals head coach The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Interviewing several head coaches with prior head coaching experience as well as others who had never been coordinators, Arizona went with something in between in the 48-year-old Wilks, who was not a coordinator until 2017.Wilks said he’s found success, mostly as a defensive backs coach, by teaching consistency. To help players learn, he said his job isn’t about telling players the same thing over and over again if they make mistakes.Instead, he said he thrives finding creative ways to communicate the same ideas in different ways.2. What will his staff look like?“I say this all the time, even with my kids, ‘I’ma teach everybody the same but I’m going to coach them differently.’ I think the most important thing you’ve got to understand is personality. Everybody is different in that room, and I want to hire coaches that understand how to relate to different personalities. This is a league about developing players.”— WilksReports following Wilks’ hiring indicated the Cardinals are well into the process of filling out the rest of the coaching staff.Wilks said he hopes hires are made by the Super Bowl, but he didn’t lend any hints toward what types of coaches and what styles they’ll coach. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more