Thousands flee Hong Kong for UK, fearing China crackdown

first_imgHONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of people from Hong Kong are fleeing their hometown since Beijing imposed a strict national security law on the territory last summer. Many say China’s encroachment on their way of life and civil liberties has become unbearable, and they want to seek a better future for their children abroad. An exodus has begun to Britain, with many taking advantage of a new immigration pathway that will allow up to 5 million eligible Hong Kongers to live, work and eventually settle in the U.K. Applications for the British National Overseas visa officially opened Sunday, and Britain’s government estimates that over 300,000 people will take up the offer of extended residency rights in the next five years. China responded by derecognizing U.K.-issued special travel documents.last_img read more

Students help gain votes

first_imgOn Nov. 2, voters in the 2nd District of Indiana will go to the polls to elect current representative, Democrat Joe Donnelly, or Republican Jackie Walorski to be their congressional representative. Over the next few weeks leading up to Election Day, several Notre Dame students who are interning with either of the congressional campaigns may approach Indiana residents and try to sway them to one candidate or another. One such intern for Donnelly, junior Conor Bolich, said his Notre Dame education armed him with skills that have proven critical in his time working with the campaign. “I feel very prepared working on the campaign,” he said. “Notre Dame has done a really good job with communicating and networking skills that are very important in politics.” Senior Eunice Ikene, also of the Donnelly campaign, said her classroom experiences have challenged her to sharpen her political knowledge. This in turn benefited her work with the campaign. “Notre Dame has helped with being up to date, such as when a voter asks about health care and small businesses,” she said. “It is not specifically in the curriculum, but when it comes up in class you want to know what is going on.” Senior Charlie Nejedly is working with Walorski’s campaign. He said he spends his time interacting with voters over the telephone and in person. “I do phone calls for Jackie Walorski and more broadly the Indiana Republican Party, and I go door to door for Jackie around South Bend and Mishawaka,” he said. Ikene and Bolich said they spend most of their time making phone calls and canvassing as well. Bolich said these pursuits are critical in understanding what voters expect from their candidates. “Just going out and listening to what voters have to say has been so important. Canvassing allows you to understand what the voters have to say,” he said. Ikene said communication is crucial in finding out what voters have to say about the campaigns as well. “One of my primary duties is making calls to voters who have leaned Democrat,” she said. “You can ask if there are any issues they have and a lot of the time voters complain about negative ads.” Ikene said her interest in these aspects of campaigning were the driving force behind her decision to work on a congressional campaign this fall. “I took a class last semester on campaign strategy that focused on polarization and negative ads,” she said. “I wanted to see how it applied to a smaller campaign in north Indiana.” Nejedly said previous political experience and his interest in the democratic process sparked his inspiration for working on the Walorski campaign. “I worked at a political action committee this summer and I thought that getting campaign experience in the field would be fun,” he said. “Those who volunteer represent the hard work of democracy. Things like getting out the vote, regular people might not do, but it is important for the democratic process.” Ikene said one thing that surprised her in her time with the campaign was the lack of basic political knowledge in some voters. “I find it interesting that some people have no idea what is going on. These are people who are registered voters, who do not even know the opposing candidate,” she said. “The fact that you don’t know who is running, that is odd.” Ikene also said that for the most part, voters she has personally interacted with have been receptive and polite. However, she said she had one bad experience with a man at one household in Granger. “This guy took forever to get to the door. When he did, he didn’t even look at me. His dog was yapping and I was scared that it was going to attack me,” she said. “After I was done, he told me he was Republican and to not waste his time.” Nejedly said working on this election has reminded him of the responsibility Indiana voters are tasked with this November. “Just staying updated on these midterm elections in general is important for our economy especially in a district like ours. What happens now could mean a job or not for some people,” he said. “It forces me to stay updated on the current events.”last_img read more

High-Heel-A-Thon supports hospital

first_imgJunior Libbie Gilliland sprinted 50 yards in her favorite pair of high heels Monday night. Gilliland, sporting the black heels decorated with silver bells and pearls, took first place in the second annual High-Heel-A-Thon sponsored by the Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon. The proceeds from the race benefit the Riley Hospital for Children, which has 19 locations throughout Indiana. Gilliland said the race is an innovative way to support the hospital’s work. “I did the High-Heel-A-Thon because I have medical conditions,” Gilliland said. “Even though I go to a hospital in the Chicago area, Riley Hospital still holds the same concept. It’s a great way for me to give back.” Dance Marathon president senior Becca Guerin said the High-Heel-A-Thon contributes to the overall goal of the marathon that will be hosted later in the year. Each high-heeled runner paid a $5 entry fee. “The people who ultimately benefit from our fundraisers like the High-Heel-A-Thon are the patients and families of Riley’s Children Hospital,” Guerin said. “It is gratifying to know that the funds we raise will make a direct impact at Riley.” The College hopes to increase its overall contribution to the hospital this year. Last year, the marathon raised over $63,000 for Riley Children’s Hospital, Guerin said. “This year, our monetary goal is to increase last year’s total by 20 percent,” she said. Juniors Kate Kellogg and Liz Kraig, co-executives for Dance Marathon fundraising, planned the race. “It’s a fun event to get the campus excited about Dance Marathon,” Kellogg said. “The idea is just to create awareness throughout the year. The High-Heel-A-Thon works perfectly in the ‘classy and fabulous’ atmosphere of Saint Mary’s.” Junior Nora Quirk finished second and junior Sarah Feeley took third. Students who attended to watch the event were aware of the impact made at Riley Children’s Hospital. Junior Christina Barra said many members of the College support the Dance Marathon in some way. “Dance Marathon is a great cause,” Barra said. “It’s great to see all the support from the Saint Mary’s community.”last_img read more

Scanlan wins in Sophomore Class Council runoff

first_imgAfter Thursday’s Sophomore Class Council election proceeded to a runoff, the results were announced Tuesday night. Tim Scanlan, current freshman class president, will begin his term as sophomore class president April 1. His council will include Nathan Foje, Andrea Palm and Emily Voorde, who will serve as vice president, secretary and treasurer, respectively. The Judicial Council reported Scanlan’s ticket received 541of 1066 votes (50.75 percent), not including 121 abstentions. The opposing ticket received 525 votes (49.25 percent). Scanlan and his ticket defeated Kevin McMannis, Cristin Pacifico, Ryan Newell and Kai Gayoso to win the election. Scanlan said his ticket looks forward to working to achieve the goals and ideals it ran on. “We want to unite the class, get people to connect across the quad, across the hall and between the different dorms,” he said. “We want to do that through several different events, from a class cup to a class stimulus package.” Scanlan said through the stimulus package, any sophomore can submit an idea for an event and Sophomore Class Council will fund, advertise and run it. “We want to do a class trip to Cedar Point as well as an off-campus winter ball,” Scanlan said. “And we’re really excited about some of the class apparel ideas we have. I think the class cup will be what we’ll work on first.” The class cup will be a year-long competition in which residence halls earn points through athletic events and activities, Scanlan said. At the end of the year, Sophomore Class Council will crown a champion. McMannis said he hopes to be involved in Student Government next year and is considering running for membership on Sophomore Class Council or applying to be the director of a Student Senate committee.last_img read more

ND recognizes eating disorders

first_imgIn observance of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, the University Counseling Center is promoting awareness of the dangerous effects of the pressure to look perfect. “Students can feel like a lot of aspects of their life are out of control, and food is one aspect that they can control,” Maureen Lafferty, assistant director of the University Counseling Center, said. “An eating disorder can develop from this mentality.” The theme of this year’s national campaign to promote awareness of eating disorders is “Everybody Knows Somebody,” which reflects that the number of eating disorders in the United States is on the rise. The campaign also focuses on how to reach out to people with these disorders. Lafferty said although people commonly associate eating disorders with women, men can also suffer from them. “Women are certainly affected more, but eating disorders are not limited exclusively to women,” she said. Signs of an eating disorder include a restricted diet, mood swings, compulsive and obsessive exercise and low self-esteem. However, Lafferty said any radical change in behavior is a cause for concern. “If you notice a significant drop in weight or a change in eating behavior, it may indicate an eating disorder,” she said. “If you have a concern, it should be expressed in the spirit of care and compassion. “It is a sensitive subject, so express your concern in a caring way rather than being accusatory” Lafferty also said turning to professionals can be a smart way to address concerns. They can provide additional information and help develop a plan for whether and how to approach the person. “Eating disorders are way more complex than we think and in some cases we need professional input to figure out the best way to approach the situation,” Lafferty said. If a student notices a friend engaging in harmful behavior, he or she should turn to a rector or a member of the University Counseling Center, Lafferty said. “Do not feel like you alone need to be responsible in the situation,” she said. “If you notice a change in a person’s behavior, do not act like a detective. Approach them with an attitude of compassion rather than anything accusatory.”last_img read more

Administrator analyzes tuition costs

first_imgIn 1991, when many current seniors were born, undergraduate tuition at Notre Dame cost $13,505. Each year since, Notre Dame has expanded, and so has its price tag.In a Feb. 18 press release, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced that undergraduate tuition at Notre Dame would increase by 3.8 percent for the 2014-15 school year, bringing the total to $46,237. After room and board, that total is $59,461. The increase itself is routine. According to a chart provided by University Spokesman Dennis Brown, this marks the fifth year in a row in which the change is limited to 3.8 percent, compared to increases recorded as high as 9 percent in the past 10 years. Steph Wulz Vice President for Finance John Sejdinaj said the process of setting tuition for each year is just one dimension of the University’s annual budget plans, which are approved by the Board of Trustees. Jenkins, University Provost Thomas Burish and Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves set goals for the year ahead before beginning the budget creation process, Sejdinaj said.“We have tried to get guidelines in place about how we want to think about tuition … and other aspects of the budget,” Sejdinaj said. “It’s really tuition, financial aid, salaries [and] benefits that are the big drivers. And once we’ve done all those, we see what money is left for other priorities.”Sejdinaj said the budget committee takes into account the cost of similar “peer institutions” when determining tuition guidelines.“We don’t want to be too high, and we don’t want to be too low versus our peer groups,” he said. “So we’re always watching what our peers are doing and where we’re at. “In the last four years, we’ve been able to look at what we actually need to fund the needs of the University, and we’ve been able to keep it down.”Specific factors that affect the percent increase each year include compensation and benefits for all employees, “non-salary” components, such as utility costs or information technology services, and building and operational costs of new facilities, according to Sejdinaj. The expenses associated with these dimensions depend largely on inflation or other factors outside the University’s control.One behind-the-scenes group that works to streamline expenses is the Office of Continuous Improvement, which Sejdinaj said works across campus to control costs.“They look at how we can [streamline] our work flows and our processes to try to save people time, so we don’t have to hire additional employees and we can save hours just by adjusting how we do these processes,” he said. “We have the Office of Sustainability that works with buildings like the power plant … to save on our utility costs. “There are a lot of things at work. Yes, we’re doing tuition increases, but we’re also doing these other things and trying to hold down the costs.”Sejdinaj said in recent years, the budget committee has prioritized investment in financial aid. Available aid has increased at a higher rate than tuition costs, he said.“In fiscal year 2000, we were spending about 28 million on financial aid, and next year we are budgeting 120 million,” he said. “So tuition is going up, but the increase in financial aid is growing three times what tuition is growing.”Notre Dame’s financial aid endowment is relatively high compared to peer universities, and more than 60 percent of financial aid comes from this endowment, which is close to $1.5 billion. Having this money allotted for financial aid “takes a lot of pressure off tuition increase so the tuition can be used for bigger projects,” he said.“Financial aid will still continue to be a priority because we’d like to get that 60 percent up closer to 80 percent, so that even more [money] is coming from scholarship endowment and that puts less pressure on tuition,” he said. “From a University standpoint, we’ve got to work to keep tuition low, and we’ve got to work to increase financial aid.”Sejdinaj said the goal is “not to have anyone graduate with more than 10 percent of the cost of four years here in need-based loans.”It is impossible to determine exactly what is or is not funded specifically by tuition because that money is just one stream into the larger “pot” of the overall budget, he said.“It’s hard to divide the pots, because there’s tuition but we also budget the net income from our auxiliaries, so athletics, the various food services and so on,” he said. “It [goes into] one big pot of money, and then we divide it out.” The bottom line when approaching the budget model is to think about it in both percentages and actual dollar amounts, Sejdinaj said. “When we look at the budget model, we take the last five years or so and say ‘Okay, where are all the revenue sources? Well, if we increase tuition by this, and salaries go up by this, and inflation goes up by this and so on, how do we make a balance?’” he said. “You do a little back and forth … and you look at it as percentages to see what’s going to happen, and then you look at it in dollars, too, to see what the actual tuition is then. “It’s a matter of balance and looking at it from different perspectives.”Tags: Tuitionlast_img read more

2017 Notre Dame class council reviews

first_imgSophomore Class CouncilSophomore Class Council (SCC) started off the year with a Sophomore Class Cookout, the only exclusively sophomore event they hosted, in mid-September. Right before fall break, they held an event called “Midterm Munchies” which was a coffee and donut giveaway, with donuts from Dunkin’ Donuts. After fall break, SCC started to gain momentum, hosting a haunted house in the LaFortune Ballroom the Thursday before Halloween, for which they rented curtains and room dividers and bought decorations to create a Halloween feel. They also organized “Thanks a Latte,” an event that gave students the opportunity to show their gratitude for people in their lives. Members of SCC were in North Dining Hall selling cups with notes and a Starbucks gift card for $5 the Sunday before Thanksgiving. Students could buy the cups with Domer Dollars and write notes to their friends, and members of SCC delivered these gift cards to the recipients. SCC also planned a Christmas event in Sorin Room in LaFortune complete with a photo booth, cookie decorating and letter writing to the retired brothers of Holy Cross.The Gatsby Dance, SCC’s largest event which typically takes place in August or September, is on Feb. 24 this year since SCC wanted to host it in the new Dahnke Ballroom.“Class councils in general have a very important role,” Joe Witt, president of SCC, said. “It’s one aspect of the Notre Dame community that is overlooked. You learn that the Notre Dame community is significant, but we absolutely make progress in the familial and communal aspects of the class.” Senior Class CouncilSenior Class Council (SCC) started the year with the Senior Class Cubs Outing, which drew in more than 100 seniors at the Four Winds Field, and a Family Feud Night at Legends — an event that included beer specials, food and a Legends gift card for the winning team. In October, SCC hosted the Senior, Cider and S’mores event in LaFortune Ballroom where seniors pre-ordered Class of 2018 blankets. They also planned a Bowl Olympics in November and included a bus to shuttle seniors to the class outing at Chippewa Bowl where they could bowl with friends. As a holiday-themed event to wrap up the semester, SCC is hosting an ornament and blanket sale in the LaFortune Student Center.“It’s been a great opportunity to meet people within the senior class that I haven’t yet met within my previous three years,” Rebecca Wiley, SCC member, said. “I think seniors have been very receptive to the events thus far because everyone’s realized that this is the last hurrah and everyone’s trying to make the most of the time they have left.”This upcoming semester, SCC has a full-day ski-trip planned to Timber Ridge Ski Resort in Michigan on Jan. 27. As part of the package, transportation will be provided to get there and back and ski lifts are included for a set price. SCC is also hosting the 100 Days Dance on Feb. 3 in Duncan Ballroom, which will mark 100 days until graduation and will be a formal event with food and a cash bar.“I think we provide a good way for students to come together as a class, especially off-campus seniors who don’t spend a lot of time on-campus automatically, we provide opportunities to come together or do activities together,” SCC communications commissioner, Emily Gust, said. Junior Class CouncilJunior Class Council (JCC) started off the semester with smaller events like giveaways, but as the semester progressed, moved into high-level programming and inaugural events. During the week just before midterms, JCC hosted an Oktoberfest complete with root beer, hot pretzels and grilled bratwursts in front of South Dining Hall. After students came back from fall break, JCC hosted a letter writing event for their classmates abroad.“We like to intersperse our big events with giveaways so we can stay on people’s radars,” Dan Hopkinson, JCC vice president, said.In November, JCC hosted a chocolate-covered strawberry giveaway in LaFortune and arranged for a food truck and a hot-chocolate bar at Fieldhouse Mall. Their last programming event, a collaboration event with other class councils called “We’re Rooting for You,” involved root beer floats and motivational notes for students before finals week.“I think this is important because a lot of student government is focused on changing policy and a lot of abstract ideas,” Hopkinson said. “But class council is bringing ideas into action with events that people can go to.”For the upcoming semester, JCC will host more giveaways as well as bigger events in the new Duncan Student Center. They will reserve rooms in the center for a Junior Class Trivia Night during one Friday in Lent, where they will serve meatless food such as macaroni and cheese, mozzarella sticks and cheese pizza. JCC will also be hosting a March Madness championship game watch in the student center.center_img Freshman Class CouncilElections for Freshman Class Council (FCC) were held in September, with officers officially elected in October. Since then, FCC has already started planning events, such as a bonfire at Holy Cross Road. They also hosted a freshman class Christmas dance in Dahnke Ballroom, which had a turnout of around 200 people. For the last day of classes before finals, they are holding a prayer service at the Grotto.Some ideas that have been proposed for next semester are a freshman class spikeball tournament, a dance in mid-March preceding St. Patrick’s day and an Easter egg decorating event. FCC is also planning a trivia night in the LaFortune Ballroom.“One of the best perks about it is because within just the first couple of weeks you know one person from every dorm,” Sam Cannova, FCC president, said. “I found an opportunity to really find connection with the people of Notre Dame. I feel like Notre Dame has a great name and great reputation but with class council I found an opportunity to connect with people.”Tags: 2017 Student Government Insider, Class Councils, freshman class council, junior class council, senior class council, sophomore class council, Student governmentlast_img read more

Residents Urged To Use Caution During Blizzard Conditions

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.MAYVILLE – With Chautauqua County expected to receive heavy snowfall through Friday, Chautauqua County Executive PJ Wendel is reminding residents to use caution while traveling.Drivers are asked to postpone or cancel non-essential trips if travel conditions are hazardous and obey travel bans.Additonal, Wendel asks drivers to clean off all snow and ice from their vehicles by making sure snow and frost is removed from the windshield, windows and side mirrors; compacted snow is removed from the wheel wells; and snow is removed from the headlights and taillights so other drivers can see you.“We have been fortunate to have some warmer weather this past week but with significant snowfall expected to return, I ask that county residents please use caution and remember to slow down if road conditions and visibility are poor,” said Wendel. “Our Chautauqua County Office of Emergency Services, Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office and Chautauqua County Department of Public Facilities Division of Transportation are prepared for this storm and I remind residents that if they must travel to please be careful.” The executive also asks residents to keep parked vehicles off the roadways and shoulders of the road so that crews and properly clear snow.Wendel says residents should call the Sheriff’s Office or other law enforcement agencies to notify them if your vehicle breaks down on the side of the road and to keep the gas tank at least half full to prevent the fuel line from freezing.Weather forecasters say heavy lake effect snow is expected with total snow accumulations of one to two feet. Winds could also gust as high as 45 to 50 m.p.h. resulting in severe blowing and drifting snow.last_img read more

Local Retailers To Limit Store Access

first_imgLAKEWOOD – Some local retailers are limiting the amount of shoppers that can enter their stores, due to the Coronavirus pandemic.Walmart announced that starting Saturday, there will be a limit of no more then 5 shoppers per 1,000 square feet in their stores.In the statement by Walmart headquarters, the superstore said associates will mark a queue at a single-entry door and direct arriving customers.”Associates and signage will remind customers of the importance of social distancing while they’re waiting to enter a store – especially before it opens in the morning,” said the store in a statement. Once a store reaches its capacity, customers will be admitted inside on a “1-out-1-in” basis, explained the company.Wegmans will also be doing something similar. The store says customers will be asked to line up outside the store during busy periods to control the number of people inside. As customers leave, more will be allowed in.Finally, BJ’s in Olean will also be putting in place similar restrictions. No more than 20% of a club’s total capacity will be allowed in the building at any given time. When possible, all members are encouraged to send only one person per household to shop in-club.These policies will be in place until further notice, all stores said. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tony Winner John Benjamin Lands Leading Role in TV Drama Manhattan

first_imgTony winner John Benjamin Hickey is set to star in the upcoming WGN America 13-episode series Manhattan, according to Deadline.com. Hickey will take on the leading role of Frank Winter, a genius and self-destructive physics professor who’s tapped to help lead the Manhattan Project. Broadway alum Daniel Stern will co-star in the show. Hickey received a Tony Award for his turn in the 2011 revival of The Normal Heart. His other Broadway credits include Mary Stuart, Love! Valour! Compassion!, Cabaret and The Crucible. Hickey’s film and TV credits include The Good Wife, Hannibal, The Big C, The New Normal, Pitch Perfect, Freedom Writers and Flags of Our Fathers. Stern made his Broadway debut in MTC’s production of The Other Place, but departed the production early due to personal family matters. He is well known for his roles in such movies as Home Alone, City Slickers and Diner. On TV, he narrated the iconic series The Wonder Years. Star Files Written by Sam Shaw and directed by Thomas Schlamme, Manhattan is set during the mission to build the world’s first atomic bomb in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and follows the brilliant but flawed scientists and their families. Stern plays Glen Babbit, a mentor to the younger physicists working on the Manhattan Project who navigates the political minefield of Los Alamos. The cast also includes Fresh Face Rachel Brosnahan, Ashley Zuckerman and Harry Lloyd. View Comments Daniel Sternlast_img read more